Family/Civil Forensic Psychology Certificate - Graduate - 2015 University Catalog


FAMILY/CIVIL FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY CERTIF

Complete the following 3 requirements:

  1. Complete 3 courses for 9 semester hours:

    PSYC 602 Introduction to Forensic Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
    PSYC 622 Forensic Psychology in Family Proceedings (3 hours lecture) 3
    PSYC 651 Seminar in Developmental Psychopathy II (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. Complete 1 course for 3 semester hours from the following:

    LAWS 555 Family Mediation (3 hours lecture) 3
    PSYC 659 Special Topics Seminar in Psychology (3 hours seminar) 3
  3. Complete or an approved elective for 3 semester hours.

    PSYC 665 Seminar in Forensic Assessment II (3 hours lecture) 3

Course Descriptions:

LAWS555: Family Mediation (3 hours lecture)

Theoretical and practical aspects of mediation in the family law context. An overview of the laws which govern and affect the formation, maintenance and dissolution of the family unit. Study of the increasingly important role of family mediation both privately and within the judicial structure. Integration of ethical and practical considerations and enhancement of student understanding through role plays and independent research. LAWS 552 is recommended as a prerequisite. 3 sh.

PSYC602: Introduction to Forensic Psychology (3 hours lecture)

The objective of this course is to broadly expose students to the discipline of forensic psychology and provide an understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the psychologist working within the justice system. This course introduces students to major topics and issues in forensic psychology and is divided into two sections. The first section examines forensic psychology as it relates to clinical prediction, assessment, and treatment in the civil and criminal justice systems. The second section focuses on experimental forensic psychology, orienting students to non-clinical issues faced by psychologists operating in these arenas. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC622: Forensic Psychology in Family Proceedings (3 hours lecture)

Children in the last few decades have been given special recognition and increased protection under state, federal and international law. But doctrines and beliefs developed in periods when the social value of children was low and the legal duties of parents and the state was minimal, continue to influence the way the law views children. This course will survey various areas of the law concerning children and examine their sources and influences. Topics to be covered are: (1) the responsibilities of the state and family in the care of the child, including education; (2) the legal treatment of abused and neglected children; (3) rules concerning the medical treatment of children; (4) adoption, surrogacy and parentage; (5) the treatment of children accused of crimes in the juvenile justice system; (6) children's disabilities; and (7) government entitlement programs for children. The course will also examine the International Convention on the Rights of the Child, a treaty that seeks to render universal certain rules respecting the treatment of children. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC651: Seminar in Developmental Psychopathy II (3 hours lecture)

This course examines psychological disorders that occur in the course of forensic assessment and involves review, critical evaluation, and integration of current scientific literature regarding diagnosis, phenomenology, and etiology. Issues in the application of the multiaxial diagnostic system of the DSM-IV in clinical practice are discussed. This course explores relevant state and federal constitutional, statutory, and case law regulating mental health professional practice. Topics include principles behind: child abuse/neglect reporting laws, child abuse/neglect risk and safety assessments, domestic violence, medical neglect, family law in divorce and dissolution, custody and parenting time, termination of parental rights, relevant psychiatric and personality disorders, confidentiality and privilege and state licensing board regulations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC659: Special Topics Seminar in Psychology (3 hours seminar)

This course provides an in-depth view of important theoretical and methodological issues in various areas of psychology. It is designed to permit faculty with particular interests and expertise to provide students with a comprehensive analysis of a selected contemporary issue (or issues) in psychology. May be repeated two times for a maximum of 9 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: For Psychology (PSYC and PYBM), Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/AdolescClinicalPsyc (CPCP), Clinical Psyc w/conc:Latina/oPsyc (CPLT), Industrial Organizational Psychology (IOPS), or School Psychologist (SPSY) majors only.

PSYC665: Seminar in Forensic Assessment II (3 hours lecture)

This course examines issues related to conducting assessments for the civil courts. Students review and critique current research in forensic psychology as well as developing case law. Current assessment practices including objective, subjective & projective and actuarial measures will be taught. Emphasis is placed on constructing the written report and on the ethical issues often faced in the forensic forum. This course will include a practicum component in which students perform forensic assessments with the instructor and/or clinical supervisor in the areas of child abuse and neglect, risk and safety assessments, domestic violence, medical neglect, family law in divorce and dissolution, custody and parenting time and termination of parental rights. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.