Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies Minor - Undergraduate - 2015 University Catalog

The Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies minor program is an interdisciplinary academic program. The minor includes three required three credit core courses: an introductory interdisciplinary course, an introduction to feminism, and a course in feminist theory. Flexibility of choice for the other 9 credits from courses in various academic departments permits a student either to get a broad perspective of women’s studies or to specialize in an area such as women in literature or women in society. Each student should consult with the Director of the Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies program to work out a suitable course of study to meet the minor's requirements.

GENDER,SEXUALITY,& WOMEN'S STUDIES MINOR

Complete 18 semester hours, including the following 2 requirement(s):

  1. GSWS MINOR REQUIRED COURSES

    Complete the following 3 courses:

    WMGS 102 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
    WMGS 201 Inventing Feminism (3 hours lecture) 3
    WMGS 301 Feminist Theory in Transnational Contexts (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. GSWS MINOR ELECTIVE COURSES

    Complete 9 semester hours from the following:

    1. 0 semester hours - 9 semester hours may be taken from:

      AFAM 207 The Black Woman: An Introductory Course (3 hours lecture) 3
      ANTH 380 Anthropology: Gender and Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
      ARHT 190 Women and Art (3 hours lecture) 3
      EDFD 264 Gender Issues in Education (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 230 Images of Muslim Women in Twentieth Century Literature and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 235 Contemporary Chinese Women's Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 294 Women Poets (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENGL 301 The Novels of Toni Morrison (3 hours lecture) 3
      ENLT 372 Women Prose Writers (3 hours lecture) 3
      FCST 205 Women in Contemporary Society (3 hours lecture) 3
      FCST 345 Gender in a Changing World (3 hours lecture) 3
      GNHU 283 Women, Gender, and Sexuality in the Ancient World (3 hours lecture) 3
      GNHU 383 Women in Antiquity (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 215 Women in American History (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 309 Feminist Ideas in Western Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
      HIST 334 Women in the Muslim World: A History of Representations (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 295 Sexuality Education in the Schools (3 hours lecture) 3
      HLTH 375 Women's Health (3 hours lecture) 3
      JUST 320 Women and Prison (3 hours lecture) 3
      LALS 205 Image and Identity: Representation of Latin American Women in Film and Fiction (3 hours lecture) 3
      LAWS 391 Women and the Law (3 hours lecture) 3
      LNGN 255 Language and Gender (3 hours lecture) 3
      POLS 214 Women in Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      PSYC 265 Psychology of Women (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 207 Religious Texts in America: Women (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 230 Wicca and Neopaganism (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 267 Women and Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      RELG 304 Feminist Theology and Spirituality (3 hours lecture) 3
      RUIN 297 Women in Russian Literature 3
      SOCI 426 Sociology of Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
      SOCI 430 Sociology of Gender (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 200 Transnational Feminisms (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 302 Selected Topics in Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 401 Independent Study: Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies 3
      WMGS 410 Cooperative Education: Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies 3
      WMGS 481 The Legal Rights of Women (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. 0 semester hours - 9 semester hours may be taken from ARHS455; ECON250; ENGL250,493,494; ENLT250; MUHS404; POLS416 and SOCI411 with written approval.

    3. One of the following may also be taken:

      FREN 283 Introduction to Women Authors of French-Speaking Africa (3 hours lecture) 3
      FRIN 283 Introduction to Women Authors of French-Speaking Africa (3 hours lecture) 3
    4. One of the following may also be taken:

      HIST 314 Women and Migration (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 314 Women and Migration (3 hours lecture) 3
    5. One of the following may also be taken:

      POLS 436 Political Science Washington, D.C., Internship 1-7
      WMGS 436 Washington, D.C. Internship 3
    6. One of the following may also be taken:

      JURI 376 Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture) 3
      PHIL 376 Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 376 Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture) 3
    7. One of the following may also be taken:

      JUST 355 Human Trafficking (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 355 Human Trafficking (3 hours lecture) 3
    8. One of the following may also be taken:

      JUST 403 Seminar on Gender and Crime (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 403 Seminar on Gender and Crime (3 hours lecture) 3
    9. One of the following may also be taken:

      SOCI 208 Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 208 Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture) 3
    10. One of the following may also be taken:

      JUST 316 Victimology (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 316 Victimology (3 hours lecture) 3
    11. One of the following may also be taken:

      ENWR 350 Writing Women Safe: Writing, Rape Prevention, and Community Activism (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 350 Writing Women Safe: Writing, Rape Prevention, and Community Activism (3 hours lecture) 3

Course Descriptions:

AFAM207: The Black Woman: An Introductory Course (3 hours lecture)

This interdisciplinary course examines the lived experiences and contributions of women of African descent through analysis of social context and a variety of theoretical perspectives. The myths and realities of Black women's experiences are explored chronologically and through literary contributions, social and political thought, and creative expression such as music and other media. 3 sh.

ANTH380: Anthropology: Gender and Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

What do "sex," "sexuality" and "gender" mean, and how have anthropologists dealt with these concepts? Using an anthropological perspective stressing an "emic" or insider view and structural constrains of class, gender, race, and nation, we will describe and analyze how genders are constructed, negotiated, and maintained throughout the world. We will examine ethnographic material from a variety of cultural settings to understand how cross-cultural studies of gender and sexuality have contributed to more complex understandings of human experience and how gender/sexual identities are constructed, deconstructed, and reconstructed. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ARHT190: Women and Art (3 hours lecture)

The role and status of women in art from the Old Stone Age through the present; women artists and the visual culture of women in Western culture; depictions of women in the arts. Fulfills the Special Topics requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 108 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EDFD264: Gender Issues in Education (3 hours lecture)

Examines the nature of gender, gender identity, gender roles and gender discrimination, and the influence of these on classrooms, schools and educational policy. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ENGL230: Images of Muslim Women in Twentieth Century Literature and Culture (3 hours lecture)

Through an exploration of writings by and about Muslim women in various parts of the world, students will be encouraged to develop an appreciation of the variety of aesthetic forms and narrative structures embodied therein. Representation in other cultural forms such as film will also be looked at to challenge monolithic assumptions. Previous course ENLT 230 effective through Winter 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL235: Contemporary Chinese Women's Literature (3 hours lecture)

Students of contemporary Chinese women's literature will analyze specific narrative techniques used in the representation of women in light of the literary inscriptions of place, family, history, gender, sexual politics, nationalism, and transnationalism. Students will examine how these narratives raise questions about Chinese origins, memories, desires and subjectivities in the age of globalization. Our primary focus will be on fiction written by women from mainland China, Taiwan, and Chinese diaspora. Previous course ENLT 235 effective through Winter 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL294: Women Poets (3 hours lecture)

Selected poets from Sappho through Emily Dickinson to Sylvia Plath examined in relation to contemporary women poets. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL301: The Novels of Toni Morrison (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on the fiction of Toni Morrison. Readings will include her published novels (from 1970 to the present), as well as selections from her critical writings. Such matters as the nature of her prose style, developments of her literary reputation, and place within the literary canon will be studied. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENLT372: Women Prose Writers (3 hours lecture)

Readings in the international fiction and non-fiction of women writers. The focus will be on such themes as the nature of the family, changing relationships between women and men, evolving concepts of the "feminine," the impact of colonialism on gender related issues (i.e. work and women's identity) and interrelationships between religion and women's lives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENWR350: Writing Women Safe: Writing, Rape Prevention, and Community Activism (3 hours lecture)

This course exposes students to writing-as-social-action through intensive study of the topic of sexual violence against women. Students will gain a broad-based understanding of community literacy and the role of writing outside school walls in order to fully explore how writing can function as an activist tool for the prevention of sexual violence. We will read broadly on the issue of sexual violence against women-analyzing depictions of rape in popular language, exploring how rape has been discussed in feminist theory and scholarship, and researching community-based and activist responses to rape and its prevention--in order to strengthen our own literacy practices towards prevention and awareness-raising. Students will be familiar with local, national, and international agencies that work to protect women from sexual violence and advocate for rape survivors. Students will develop activist writing projects that work to serve and further these existing efforts. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENGL 300, ENJR 210, ENJR 211, ENWR 250, ENWR 204, ENWR 205, ENWR 206, ENWR 207, or WMGS 201.

FCST205: Women in Contemporary Society (3 hours lecture)

Through this course students gain an understanding of how historical developments and social forces have shaped the status of women in America. Students engage in discussion about current concerns and role options available to today's women. Special attention is given to the construction of womanhood and the intersections of gender with race, ethnicity, class, and sexuality. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 or ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

FCST345: Gender in a Changing World (3 hours lecture)

Gender issues that exist in our society and cross-culturally. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department or departmental approval.

FREN283: Introduction to Women Authors of French-Speaking Africa (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the representations of women in post-colonial literature by French-speaking women authors from North and Sub-Saharan Africa (readings in English translation). Students will explore major works of fiction by women authors as they relate to gender and cultural identity. Readings include novels that deal with contemporary socio-cultural issues. Meets the Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

FRIN283: Introduction to Women Authors of French-Speaking Africa (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the representations of women in post-colonial literature by French-speaking women authors from North and Sub-Saharan Africa (readings in English translation). Students will explore major works of fiction by women authors as they relate to gender and cultural identity. Readings include novels that deal with contemporary socio-cultural issues. Meets the Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

GNHU283: Women, Gender, and Sexuality in the Ancient World (3 hours lecture)

This course uses women, gender, and sexuality to model a broad, cross-disciplinary, and issue-oriented approach to ancient societies. Students will examine cultural and historical objects, such as historical and philosophical works, inscriptions, and graffiti. They will view monuments and artifacts. They will learn how to approach complex cultural objects and understand how social constructions of gender affected and reflected the lives of women and men in ancient Greece, Rome, and the Near East. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 115 or GNHU 151 or ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

GNHU383: Women in Antiquity (3 hours lecture)

Women in the ancient world and their contributions to history, literature, philosophy and the arts. Emphasis on Greco-Roman civilization, with comparative study of other ancient cultures. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 and GNHU 201 or HONP 101 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201 or GNHU 202 or GNHU 285 or WMGS 201 or departmental approval.

HIST215: Women in American History (3 hours lecture)

The changing role and status of women in American society from colonial times to the present. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

HIST309: Feminist Ideas in Western Thought (3 hours lecture)

History of feminist ideas and theories about women and womanhood. Students examine important theoretical literature in Europe and America from 18th century to present. Original texts of Wollstonecroft, Fuller, Mill, and Freud will be considered against their socio-historic milieu. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST314: Women and Migration (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on female migrants from the late nineteenth century to the present. Using an interdisciplinary approach with an emphasis on historical studies, it considers issues of work, family, sexuality, and identity formation for migrant women past and present. Questions to explore include: what distinguishes the experiences of migration for women; what are the continuities and differences for women across time, ethnicity, and geography; how do historians, sociologists, anthropologists, and others, as well as the migrants themselves, understand female migration; what do women gain and lose through migration; and why a gendered approach to migration studies is crucial. Cross listed with Women's and Gender Studies, WMGS 314. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 102; or HIST 100 and HIST 117 or 118.

HIST334: Women in the Muslim World: A History of Representations (3 hours lecture)

A survey of writings by and about Muslim women examined historiographically. We examine conventional wisdom about Muslim women through the ages, and how this "wisdom" was constructed: Who wrote about Muslim women? When? How? What purposes have these writings served at different times and places since the inception of Islam and during the course of its 1,500 year history. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Passing grade in the following: HIST 100; HIST 117 or 118; HIST 103 or 105 or 106; 108 or 109 or 114 or 116 or 128 or 129 or 131 or 132 or 133.

HLTH295: Sexuality Education in the Schools (3 hours lecture)

Focus on sexuality content and teaching methodology for sex education K-12 in schools. Based on NJ Content Standards for Sexuality Education. 3 sh.

HLTH375: Women's Health (3 hours lecture)

This course offers perspectives on women's health and health care, focusing predominately on the United States but with some attention to international and global issues. Students will receive an overview of the health status and major health concerns of women. Acute and chronic problems will be addressed across the lifespan. This course includes fieldwork experience. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or WMGS 102 or departmental approval.

JURI376: Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the philosophical basis of legal doctrines as they apply to women and feminist issues. The course will explore the legal arguments feminists have made for social and political equality. It will also examine whether gender bias is built into traditional jurisprudential theories. Women's rights and women's legal status in politics, employment, education, and the family will be explored. Cross-listed with PHIL 376 and WMGS 376. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or WMGS 200 or WMGS 201.

JUST316: Victimology (3 hours lecture)

Victimology is the scientific study of victims including the relationship between the victim and offender, the victim and the criminal justice system, and the victim with other societal institutions. The goal of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the subject of victimology in the context of Criminology and Women's and Gender studies. The course will be presented in three parts: Research and theory on victimization, Exploration of special topics in victimology, and Historical and Contemporary practical responses to victimization. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201 or WMGS 301 or departmental approval.

JUST320: Women and Prison (3 hours lecture)

This course will take a comprehensive view of the issues that bring women in contact with the criminal justice system and correctional institutions. Students will discuss the historical legacy of female incarceration in Europe and America. They will discover that the demographic intersections of gender, race, class and gender orientation play a major role in sentencing outcomes. Gender responsive programming as well as role model programs in the US, Canada and Europe will be discussed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST355: Human Trafficking (3 hours lecture)

The goal of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of global human trafficking, including extent, causes, impact, perpetrators, victims and responses. In addition to an overview of the global issues we will examine the multifaceted needs of trafficking survivors, and legal and policy approaches to reducing the problem. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201 and/or departmental permission.

JUST403: Seminar on Gender and Crime (3 hours lecture)

The goal of this course is to provide an upper-level, trans-disciplinary overview of ways that gender shapes individuals' experiences with the criminal justice system as workers, offenders and victims. Emphasis will be placed on the examination of structural disadvantage, the gendered nature of criminological theoretical perspectives, and the victim/offender dichotomy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 301 or JUST 310 or by departmental approval.

LALS205: Image and Identity: Representation of Latin American Women in Film and Fiction (3 hours lecture)

An analysis of representations of women in film and fiction with a special focus on the process of identity construction. Representations of women from pre-Columbian times to the present will be studied in relation to their use in the perpetuation of ideologies. Intended as an overview of the social history of women in Latin America. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

LAWS391: Women and the Law (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to and evaluation of the changing patterns of gender-based laws in the United States in terms of the preferences they reflect and the rationales used to justify them. Emphasis on issues which impact upon women's rights, relevant case law which impacts upon the roles and rights of women, and legislation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or WMGS 102.

LNGN255: Language and Gender (3 hours lecture)

A sociolinguistic study of the interaction of language with sex and gender. Course includes a survey of the literature on language and gender plus practical experience in collecting and analyzing linguistic data. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

PHIL376: Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the philosophical basis of legal doctrines as they apply to women and feminist issues. The course will explore the legal arguments feminists have made for social and political equality. It will also examine whether gender bias is built into traditional jurisprudential theories. Women's rights and women's legal status in politics, employment, education, and the family will be explored. Cross-listed with JURI 376 and WMGS 376. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or WMGS 200 or WMGS 201.

POLS214: Women in Politics (3 hours lecture)

The role of women in the functioning of the American political system. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

POLS436: Political Science Washington, D.C., Internship

In this course students intern in Washington, D.C., at governmental offices, interest groups, party and electoral organizations, law and lobbying firms or other political organizations. Students' academic learning is assessed by faculty, and their work performance is evaluated by their placement supervisor. Students may receive up to 7.0 credits in Political Science and up to 8.0 credits in a corequisite Cooperative Education course. Cross listed with Women's and Gender Studies, WMGS 436. 1 - 7 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC265: Psychology of Women (3 hours lecture)

The course will investigate contemporary issues in the psychology of women (an opportunity for original research will be provided). Theoretical positions and recent research in the area will be examined. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

RELG207: Religious Texts in America: Women (3 hours lecture)

Course will examine original texts by women written during the religious growth and development of such movements as Evangelicalism, Mormonism, the Westward missionary expansion, African-American slave narratives, hymns, sermons, and exhortations. Emphasis will be on the ways religion served as an acceptable locus of expression for women. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG230: Wicca and Neopaganism (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the many new religions in Europe and the United states that focus on nature worship and the practice of magic and frequently claim to be recreating ancient, pre-Christian religions. This course will introduce students to the variety of religions co-existing under the Wicca and Neopaganism labels, examine their shared beliefs and practices, and debate the many controversies that arise around them. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG267: Women and Religion (3 hours lecture)

Focuses on women's own experience in religions and the various perspectives of women held by both Eastern and Western religious traditions. The course deals with questions such as the nature of women, patriarchy and religion, and roles of women in religions. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Religious Studies. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG304: Feminist Theology and Spirituality (3 hours lecture)

This course examines primary religious documents, their traditional interpretations, and recent feminist interpretations of these documents. It considers feminist criticisms of traditional Western religious thought as it relates to women. It also explores recent developments in feminist theology, such as female-centered religious ritual and practice and eco-feminist/creation spirituality. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 221 or RELG 240 or RELG 246 or RELG 250 or RELG 252 or RELG 254 or RELG 256 or RELG 267.

RUIN297: Women in Russian Literature

This course will examine the roles, status, identity and problems of female characters in representative works of Russian literature from the medieval period to the present. It will trace the development of mythic images about "Mother Russia," study the cultural messages of classic nineteenth century Russian heroines and explore adaptations in the traditional appreciation of Russian women in the early Soviet period as well as contemporary works. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

SOCI208: Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on men and masculine identities in the United States and other countries. It reviews how masculine identities are constructed in everyday lives and how societies shape such identities. In this class, we will examine the construction of masculinity in different areas such as work, school, sports, family and other social relationships. We also explore the diverse experiences of masculinities based on race, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 104 or SOCI 106 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201.

SOCI426: Sociology of Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

The course examines theoretical and empirical work in the sociology of sexuality. It seeks to understand the social foundations of sexual behavior and sexual identity. It explores the relationship between sexuality and politics, focusing on current as well as historical conflicts over sexual behavior and ideologies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI430: Sociology of Gender (3 hours lecture)

The social determinants of differences between women and men and the effect of sex role differentiation in the social institutions of marriage and family, the economy and work situation, formal education, health, mass media, and religion; special emphasis is placed on the impact of social change on sex roles in contemporary society. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

WMGS102: Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces the student to the broad and interdisciplinary field known as Women's and Gender Studies. It is designed to make students aware of the new discoveries in feminist and gender studies research and to focus on many aspects of the female experience and the social construction of gendered identities. The course is designed to help students understand different theories and methodologies in diverse disciplines and to treat areas such as literature, history, psychology and the arts through an issue-oriented approach. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

WMGS200: Transnational Feminisms (3 hours lecture)

This course will interrogate the concept and practice of feminism from various locations outside of the U.S. Students will examine the political, cultural and socio-economic structures that promote or inhibit activism on women's lives and issues. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - K2 Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Previous course WMGS 303 effective through Winter 2011. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 102.

WMGS201: Inventing Feminism (3 hours lecture)

How did feminism begin in Europe and America? This course studies the birth of feminism as an international political movement and explores its growth in response to Western social developments from 1750 to the mid-twentieth century. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 102.

WMGS208: Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on men and masculine identities in the United States and other countries. It reviews how masculine identities are constructed in everyday lives and how societies shape such identities. In this class, we will examine the construction of masculinity in different areas such as work, school, sports, family and other social relationships. We also explore the diverse experiences of masculinities based on race, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or SOCI 204 or SOCI 206.

WMGS301: Feminist Theory in Transnational Contexts (3 hours lecture)

This course examines a wide variety of feminist theories which illustrate the many ways in which issues of gender can be interpreted. Recognizing that gendered identities are molded by such factors as class, race, sexual orientation and national identity, this course explores the issues of difference among women and the role of theory in conceptualizing such differences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 200 or WMGS 201 or WMGS 208 or SOCI 208.

WMGS302: Selected Topics in Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies (3 hours lecture)

The exploration of a topic related to Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies which is either not covered in the curriculum or which deserves more in-depth treatment than is possible in an existing course. The specific topic will be announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated two times (as long as the topic is different) for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 200 or WMGS 201 or WMGS 208 or SOCI 208.

WMGS314: Women and Migration (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on female migrants from the late nineteenth century to the present. Using an interdisciplinary approach with an emphasis on historical studies, it considers issues of work, family, sexuality, and identity formation for migrant women past and present. Questions to explore include: what distinguishes the experiences of migration for women; what are the continuities and differences for women across time, ethnicity, and geography; how do historians, sociologists, anthropologists, and others, as well as the migrants themselves, understand female migration; what do women gain and lose through migration, and why a gendered approach to migration studies is crucial. Cross listed with History, HIST 314. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 102; or HIST 100 and HIST 117 or 118.

WMGS316: Victimology (3 hours lecture)

Victimology is the scientific study of victims including the relationship between the victim and offender, the victim and the criminal justice system, and the victim with other societal institutions. The goal of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the subject of victimology in the context of Criminology and Women's and Gender Studies. The course will be presented in three parts: Research and theory on victimization, Exploration of special topics in victimology, and Historical and Contemporary practical responses to victimization. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201 or WMGS 301 or departmental approval.

WMGS350: Writing Women Safe: Writing, Rape Prevention, and Community Activism (3 hours lecture)

This course exposes students to writing-as-social-action through intensive study of the topic of sexual violence against women. Students will gain a broad-based understanding of community literacy and the role of writing outside school walls in order to fully explore how writing can function as an activist tool for the prevention of sexual violence. We will read broadly on the issue of sexual violence against women-analyzing depictions of rape in popular language, exploring how rape has been discussed in feminist theory and scholarship, and researching community-based and activist responses to rape and its prevention-in order to strengthen our own literacy practices towards prevention and awareness-raising. Students will be familiar with local, national, and international agencies that work to protect women from sexual violence and advocate for rape survivors. Students will develop activist writing projects that work to serve and further these existing efforts. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENGL 300, ENJR 210, ENJR 211, ENWR 204, ENWR 205, ENWR 206, ENWR 207, ENWR 250, or WMGS 201.

WMGS355: Human Trafficking (3 hours lecture)

The goal of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of global human trafficking, including extent, causes, impact, perpetrators, victims and responses. In addition to an overview of the global issues we will examine the multifaceted needs of trafficking survivors, and legal and policy approaches to reducing the problem. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 201 or WMGS 200 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental permission.

WMGS376: Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the philosophical basis of legal doctrines as they apply to women and feminist issues. The course will explore the legal arguments feminists have made for social and political equality. It will also examine whether gender bias is built into traditional jurisprudential theories. Women's rights and women's legal status in politics, employment, education, and the family will be explored. Cross-listed with PHIL 376 and JURI 376. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or WMGS 200 or WMGS 201.

WMGS401: Independent Study: Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies

This course involves advanced research on a topic of particular interest to the students that goes beyond the scope of available courses in Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies. Students are required to hand in an extensive paper documenting the results of their research. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 301 and approval of the WMGS Director.

WMGS403: Seminar on Gender and Crime (3 hours lecture)

The goal of this course is to provide an upper-level, trans-disciplinary overview of ways that gender shapes individuals' experiences with the criminal justice system as workers, offenders and victims. Emphasis will be placed on the examination of structural disadvantage, the gendered nature of criminological theoretical perspectives, and the victim/offender dichotomy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 301 or JUST 310 or by departmental approval.

WMGS410: Cooperative Education: Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies

Academic study integrated with supervised internship in an organization, agency, or business that addresses women's issues or issues of gender or sexuality. Part-time (20 hours per week). Required individual meetings with faculty advisor supplement experiential component, and include discussion of field work experience, connection between feminist/gender studies theories and practice, issues of access and diversity, civic responsibility, and career options. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 102, WMGS 301 and at least one other WMGS course; minimum GPA of 3.0; approval of WMGS director.

WMGS436: Washington, D.C. Internship

In this course students will intern in Washington, D.C., at governmental offices, interest groups, party and electoral organizations, law and lobbying firms or other political organizations. Students' academic learning is assessed by faculty and their work performance is evaluated by their placement supervisor. Students may receive up to 7.0 credits in Women's and Gender Studies and up to 8.0 credits in a corequisite Cooperative Education course. Cross listed with Political Science, POLS 436. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 102 plus two Women's and Gender Studies electives relevant to the intended placement (subject to the Women's and Gender Studies director's approval) and a minimum 3.0 G.P.A. in the major or minor.

WMGS481: The Legal Rights of Women (3 hours lecture)

This course will include some historical background for clearer understanding of what the changes in laws mean for women and men. Discussion and study of the effect of affirmative action, civil rights legislation and titles VI and IX will be included. Legal rights in the areas of education, employment, finances and credit, property ownership, marriage and divorce, health care, pensions and criminal law will be covered. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Previous course COUN 481 effective through Summer 2011. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.