Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies Major with Teacher Certification in Elementary School Teacher in Grades K-6 (B.A.) - Undergraduate - 2015 University Catalog


GENDER, SEXUALITY & WOMEN'S STUDIES MAJR

Complete 2 requirements:

  1. MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

    Complete 33 semester hours including the following 2 requirement(s):

    1. REQUIRED CORE

      Complete the following 5 courses:

      GLQS 100 Introduction to Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer (GLBTQ) Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      GLQS 201 Queer Identities in a Transforming World: The Trouble with Normal (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 102 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 200 Transnational Feminisms (3 hours lecture) 3
      WMGS 402 Sexuality, and Women's Studies 3
    2. DISTRIBUTION ELECTIVES

      1. HISTORICAL ISSUES

        Complete 1 course from:

        GNHU 283 Women, Gender, and Sexuality in the Ancient World (3 hours lecture) 3
        WMGS 201 Inventing Feminism (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. THEORETICAL ISSUES

        Complete 1 course from:

        GLQS 301 Queer Theory (3 hours lecture) 3
        WMGS 301 Feminist Theory in Transnational Contexts (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

        Complete 1 course from:

        ENTR 201 The Entrepreneurial Mindset and Innovation (3 hours lecture) 3
        ENWR 206 Workplace Writing (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 294 Psychology of Leadership: Theory and Application (3 hours lecture) 3
        WMGS 350 Writing Women Safe: Writing, Rape Prevention, and Community Activism (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. MAJOR ELECTIVES

      Complete 3 courses from the following. At least 6 hours must be 200 level or above:

      1. ENGLISH

        (If focus is appropriate, ENGL 250, ENGL493, ENGL494, ENLT250, & ENLT492 may be used)

        ENFL 365 Gender and Sexuality in Film (3 hours lecture) 3
        ENGL 207 World Literature: Voices of Tradition and Challenge (3 hours lecture) 3
        ENGL 227 Queer Fiction (3 hours lecture) 3
        ENGL 230 Images of Muslim Women in Twentieth Century Literature and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
        ENGL 235 Contemporary Chinese Women's Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
        ENGL 294 Women Poets (3 hours lecture) 3
        ENGL 301 The Novels of Toni Morrison (3 hours lecture) 3
        ENLT 372 Women Prose Writers (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. ENTREPENEURSHIP

        ENTR 201 The Entrepreneurial Mindset and Innovation (3 hours lecture) 3
        ENTR 290 Selected Topics in Entrepreneurship (2 hours lecture, 0.5 hours field/class) 1-3
        ENTR 301 Creating Your Startup Business Model (3 hours lecture) 3
        ENTR 302 Preparing to Pitch and Launch Your Startup (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. GENDER, SEXUALITY, AND WOMEN'S STUDIES

        1. 0 semester hours-3 semester hours from the following may be taken:

          SOCI 208 Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture) 3
          WMGS 208 Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. 0 semester hours-3 semester hours from the following may be taken:

          ENGL 308 Gender and Sexuality in Asian American Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
          WMGS 308 Gender and Sexuality in Asian American Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
        3. 0 semester hours-3 semester hours from the following may be taken:

          HIST 314 Women and Migration (3 hours lecture) 3
          WMGS 314 Women and Migration (3 hours lecture) 3
        4. 0 semester hours-3 semester hours from the following may be taken:

          JUST 316 Victimology (3 hours lecture) 3
          WMGS 316 Victimology (3 hours lecture) 3
        5. 0 semester hours-3 semester hours from the following may be taken:

          GNHU 345 Imaging Medieval and Early Modern Women (3 hours lecture) 3
          WMGS 345 Imaging Medieval and Early Modern Women (3 hours lecture) 3
        6. 0 semester hours-3 semester hours from the following may be taken:

          ENWR 350 Writing Women Safe: Writing, Rape Prevention, and Community Activism (3 hours lecture) 3
          WMGS 350 Writing Women Safe: Writing, Rape Prevention, and Community Activism (3 hours lecture) 3
        7. 0 semester hours-3 semester hours from the following may be taken:

          JUST 355 Human Trafficking (3 hours lecture) 3
          WMGS 355 Human Trafficking (3 hours lecture) 3
        8. 0 semester hours - 3 semester hours may be taken from the following:.

          JURI 376 Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture) 3
          PHIL 376 Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture) 3
          WMGS 376 Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture) 3
        9. 0 semester hours-3 semester hours from the following may be taken:

          JUST 403 Seminar on Gender and Crime (3 hours lecture) 3
          WMGS 403 Seminar on Gender and Crime (3 hours lecture) 3
        10. 0 semester hours-3 semester hours from the following may be taken:

          POLS 436 Political Science Washington, D.C., Internship 1-7
          WMGS 436 Washington, D.C. Internship 3
        11. 0 semester hours-9 semester hours from the following may be taken:

          GLQS 301 Queer Theory (3 hours lecture) 3
          GLQS 302 Selected Topics in Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
          WMGS 201 Inventing Feminism (3 hours lecture) 3
          WMGS 301 Feminist Theory in Transnational Contexts (3 hours lecture) 3
          WMGS 302 Selected Topics in Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies (3 hours lecture) 3
          WMGS 350 Writing Women Safe: Writing, Rape Prevention, and Community Activism (3 hours lecture) 3
          WMGS 401 Independent Study: Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies 3
          WMGS 410 Cooperative Education: Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies 3
          WMGS 481 The Legal Rights of Women (3 hours lecture) 3
      4. HISTORY

        0 semester hours-9 semester hours may be taken from the following:

        HIST 215 Women in American History (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 309 Feminist Ideas in Western Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
        HIST 334 Women in the Muslim World: A History of Representations (3 hours lecture) 3
      5. PHILOSOPHY/RELIGION

        0 semester hours - 9 semester hours may be taken from the following:

        PHIL 339 Contemporary Continental Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
        RELG 230 Wicca and Neopaganism (3 hours lecture) 3
        RELG 267 Women and Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
        RELG 304 Feminist Theology and Spirituality (3 hours lecture) 3
      6. POLITICAL SCIENCE

        0 semester hours-9 semester hours may be taken from the following: (If focus is appropriate, POLS 416 may be used).

        LAWS 391 Women and the Law (3 hours lecture) 3
        POLS 214 Women in Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
      7. PUBLIC AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING

        0 semester hours - 9 semester hours may be taken from:

        ENWR 206 Workplace Writing (3 hours lecture) 3
        ENWR 208 Digital Writing: Composing with Text, Image, and Sound (3 hours lecture) 3
        ENWR 400 Community Writing: Theories, Practices, and Partnerships (3 hours lecture) 3
      8. SOCIOLOGY

        0 semester hours - 9 semester hours may be taken from: (If focus is appropriate, SOCI 411 may be used)

        SOCI 426 Sociology of Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
        SOCI 430 Sociology of Gender (3 hours lecture) 3
      9. OTHER ELECTIVES

        0 semester hours -15 semester hours may be taken from the following:

        1. .

          AFAM 207 The Black Woman: An Introductory Course (3 hours lecture) 3
          ANTH 340 The Anthropology of Work (3 hours lecture) 3
          ANTH 380 Anthropology: Gender and Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
          ANTH 423 Community and Health (3 hours lecture) 3-4
          ARHT 190 Women and Art (3 hours lecture) 3
          ARTX 122 Culture and Appearance (3 hours lecture) 3
          EDFD 264 Gender Issues in Education (3 hours lecture) 3
          FCST 205 Women in Contemporary Society (3 hours lecture) 3
          FCST 345 Gender in a Changing World (3 hours lecture) 3
          GNHU 283 Women, Gender, and Sexuality in the Ancient World (3 hours lecture) 3
          GNHU 383 Women in Antiquity (3 hours lecture) 3
          HLTH 290 Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
          HLTH 295 Sexuality Education in the Schools (3 hours lecture) 3
          HLTH 375 Women's Health (3 hours lecture) 3
          JUST 320 Women and Prison (3 hours lecture) 3
          LALS 205 Image and Identity: Representation of Latin American Women in Film and Fiction (3 hours lecture) 3
          LNGN 255 Language and Gender (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 265 Psychology of Women (3 hours lecture) 3
          PSYC 294 Psychology of Leadership: Theory and Application (3 hours lecture) 3
          RUIN 297 Women in Russian Literature 3
        2. 0 semester hours - 3 semester hours from the following may be taken:

          FREN 283 Introduction to Women Authors of French-Speaking Africa (3 hours lecture) 3
          FRIN 283 Introduction to Women Authors of French-Speaking Africa (3 hours lecture) 3
          SPAN 473 Sexual Subversion in Contemporary Hispanic Literature and Film (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. TEACHER ED PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS (K-6)

    Complete the following 3 requirement(s):

    1. PRE-PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE

      Complete the following 3 requirements:

      1. PRE-PROFESSIONAL CORE

        Complete for 15 semester hours

        CMST 101 Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture) 3
        EDFD 220 Philosophical Orientation to Education (3 hours lecture) 3
        FCST 214 Child Development I (3 hours lecture) 3
        FCST 314 Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. HEALTH FOR TEACHER EDUCATION

        Complete 1 course from the following, or pass the MSU Health Knowledge Test available through the Center of Pedagogy:

        BIOL 100 Biological Sciences (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 107 Biology for Survival (3 hours lecture) 3
        BIOL 110 The Biology of Human Life (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 215 Human Heredity (3 hours lecture) 3
        BIOL 240 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology I (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        BIOL 241 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology II (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        BIOL 243 Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 380 Genetics (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
        HLTH 101 Personal Health Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 207 Safety, Accidents and Emergency Care. Starting Winter 2016: Injury Prevention and Emergency Care (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 210 Consumer Health (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 213 Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 220 Mental Health (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 290 Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 307 The Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 314 Public Health Aspects of Alcohol Abuse (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 330 Foundations of Health Education. Starting Winter 2016: Health Education Methods (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 411 School Health and Community Services (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 430 Health Counseling. Starting Winter 2016: Counseling Skills for Public Health Professionals (3 hours lecture) 3
        HONP 210 Honors Seminar in Science (3 hours seminar, 2 hours lab) 4
        HONP 211 Honors Seminar in Contemporary Issues in Science (3 hours seminar) 3
        HPEM 150 Principles and Practice of Emergency Care (3 hours lecture) 3
        NUFD 182 Nutrition (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT

        Complete the following 2 courses:

        MTHM 201 Mathematics in Elementary Schools I (3 hours lecture) 3
        MTHM 302 Mathematics in Elementary Schools II (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. ELEMENTARY ED PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE

      Complete for 18 semester hours

      ECEL 200 Perspectives on Early Childhood and Elementary Education in a Democracy (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other) 3
      ECEL 408 Social Studies and the Arts in Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECEL 418 Social and Cultural Context of Families and Communities (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECEL 427 Explorations: Science, Math, and Technology in the Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture) 3
      READ 399 Early Literacy Development and Instruction (3 hours lecture) 3
      READ 408 Literacy in the Elementary Grades (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. CLINICAL SEQUENCE/STUDENT TEACHING

      Complete the following 2 requirements for 15 semester hours:

      1. Complete the following for 7 semester hours:

        1. Complete 3 courses for 5 semester hours:

          ECEL 412 Seminar I: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms (1 hour seminar) 1
          ECEL 421 Seminar II: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms (1 hour seminar) 1
          ECEL 422 Integrating Elementary Curriculum and Assessment for Equity and Diversity (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete for 2 semester hours.

          ECEL 410 Clinical Experience I: Inclusive Elementary and Early Childhood Classrooms 1-3
      2. Complete for 8 semester hours.

        ECEL 414 Clinical Experience II: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms 8

Course Descriptions:

AFAM207: The Black Woman: An Introductory Course (3 hours lecture)

This interdisciplinary course examines the lived experiences and contributions of women of African descent through analysis of social context and a variety of theoretical perspectives. The myths and realities of Black women's experiences are explored chronologically and through literary contributions, social and political thought, and creative expression such as music and other media. 3 sh.

ANTH340: The Anthropology of Work (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with an understanding of human work across cultural space and historical time. Various subsistence strategies (e.g. foraging, pastoralism, agriculture and industrial) are covered. Connections among forms of work, the social relations of work, the meanings of work, and social stratification (e.g. class, gender, race/ethnicity, age) are discussed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 125 or ANTH 155 or ANTH 135 or ANTH 145 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH380: Anthropology: Gender and Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

What do "sex," "sexuality" and "gender" mean, and how have anthropologists dealt with these concepts? Using an anthropological perspective stressing an "emic" or insider view and structural constrains of class, gender, race, and nation, we will describe and analyze how genders are constructed, negotiated, and maintained throughout the world. We will examine ethnographic material from a variety of cultural settings to understand how cross-cultural studies of gender and sexuality have contributed to more complex understandings of human experience and how gender/sexual identities are constructed, deconstructed, and reconstructed. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 201 or ANTH 270 or departmental approval.

ANTH423: Community and Health (3 hours lecture)

The study of how social and cultural influences and inequalities related to age, class, disability, ethnicity, gender, race, and sexual orientation impact health and disease in communities. Case studies will examine health in relationship to community issues including homelessness, the health care delivery system, role of community in disease prevention/treatment, social inclusion, and program evaluation. 3 - 4 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or ANTH 308 or ANTH 310 or ANTH 312 or ANTH 330 or ANTH 340 or ANTH 350 or ANTH 360 or ANTH 370 or ANTH 380.

ARHT190: Women and Art (3 hours lecture)

The role and status of women in art from the Old Stone Age through the present; women artists and the visual culture of women in Western culture; depictions of women in the arts. Fulfills the Special Topics requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 108 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARTX122: Culture and Appearance (3 hours lecture)

Analysis of dress in terms of cultural, social, psychological and economic influences. Clothing and adornment choices related to individual concerns, including aesthetic, physical and ecological factors. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science. Meets the 1983 General Education Requirement (GER) - Electives, Personal/Professional Issues. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

BIOL100: Biological Sciences (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The study of life from molecule to organism with focus on structure and function of cells, mechanisms of heredity and change, survey of animals and plants and their interrelationships in the living world. Open to non-majors as well as majors. BIOL 100 is not included in the GPA as a biology major course. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

BIOL107: Biology for Survival (3 hours lecture)

Basic concepts of biology that focus on social implications of pollution, population control, radiation, drugs, pesticides, the genetic revolution, etc. For non-science majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

BIOL110: The Biology of Human Life (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The course is intended to serve the non-biology major and present a basic introduction to human anatomy and physiology. It will provide students with a laboratory experience so that they may learn the scientific method and its application in the field of human biology. This course will provide these students with a body of knowledge specific to human anatomy and physiology so that they may be well informed when dealing with important personal, family and societal issues relative to health and life-style decisions. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

BIOL215: Human Heredity (3 hours lecture)

A non-major course introducing concepts of classical heredity and modern molecular genetics, which stresses the techniques and significance of genetic knowledge and research. 3 sh.

BIOL240: Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology I (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Human anatomy and physiology for health education and physical education majors. Not for biology majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

BIOL241: Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology II (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Human anatomy and physiology for health education and physical education majors. Not for biology majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 240.

BIOL243: Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

A study of the dynamics of the human body in relation to its structure and function is based on its nutritional input. Each organ system is discussed in relation to its contribution to the whole functioning organism, as well as a basic survey of its pathologies. Primarily for ADA certification. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 130.

BIOL380: Genetics (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Lecture and lab. Heredity, gene and chromosomal structure and function, gene regulation, mutation and repair, genes in populations, genetic manipulation, and applied genetics are covered. Lab exercises demonstrate genetic concepts. A semester-long project with research paper is required. Required of all biology majors and minors. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Biology, Molecular Biology and Science Informatics. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 230 with a grade of C- or higher and CHEM 120 with a grade of C- or higher.

CMST101: Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical requirements of different types of public presentations and helps students develop an understanding and appreciation of the dynamic nature of the communication process. The course focuses on the basic elements of the communication process, listening, communicator and audience characteristics, basic research skills, and message composition and delivery. Students learn about the demands of public presentations in culturally and professionally diverse environments and develop presentation competence and flexibility. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Communication, Communication. Previous course SPCM 101 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ECEL200: Perspectives on Early Childhood and Elementary Education in a Democracy (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other)

This course examines the education of children during their early and elementary school years from historical, political, social, and cultural perspectives. Students critically analyze issues influencing our current public education system to determine their impact on schools, teachers, children families, and society. They examine how our education systems reflect and respond to the changing needs, knowledge, and dispositions of our democratic society. Closed to Freshmen. 25 hours of field experience required. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 or equivalent writing course from an accredited college/university. Not open to freshmen.

ECEL408: Social Studies and the Arts in Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture)

In this course, students consider the knowledge, skills, and perspectives necessary to help learners become active and informed citizens able to think critically about local, national, and global contexts in the 21st Century. Students are introduced to the four strands that frame social studies in New Jersey-(A) Civics, Government, and Human Rights; (B) Geography, People, and the Environment; (C) Economics, Innovation, and Technology; and (D) History, Culture, and Perspectives. Independently and in groups, students enter real and virtual spaces to plan, implement, and evaluate teaching and learning that draws upon technology. Students experiment with technology and the arts-dance, theater, music, and the visual arts-in their discovery of methods that position learners to understand the myths and truths of the past and present with the capacity to imagine future realities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

ECEL410: Clinical Experience I: Inclusive Elementary and Early Childhood Classrooms

This course introduces students to the dynamics of inclusive elementary and early childhood classrooms, schools, and communities. Through required fieldwork in elementary and early childhood settings, observations, interviews, and data collection, students discuss the role of the teacher(s), documentation and assessment techniques, variables of the classroom environment, school climate, and the wider community. Students implement lesson plans and use a range of observation and documentation strategies including running records, environmental rating scales, anecdotal records, checklists, rating scales, and examination of children's work. Students learn to link community resources to school and classroom needs, collect data to inform instructional practice and culturally responsive teaching and learning, and evaluate the progress and needs of children in inclusive elementary and early childhood settings. Fieldwork is required. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200 and READ 399.

ECEL412: Seminar I: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms (1 hour seminar)

Accompanies ECEL 410, Clinical Experience I: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms, and offers students a forum for discussion, reflection, and critical thinking with regard to clinical work in inclusive elementary classrooms. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200.

ECEL414: Clinical Experience II: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms

Students demonstrate their knowledge of child and early adolescent development and the significant role of families and communities with regard to children's learning by planning and implementing developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive curriculum in an inclusive elementary classroom. Focusing on the diverse needs of individual children, students develop, implement, and assess an integrated curriculum unit that incorporates the Core Curriculum Content Standards and emphasizes literacy across the curriculum. As reflective practitioners, students utilize multiple strategies to assess children's learning, classroom climate, and effective classroom management. Students are responsible for the full range of teacher activities in the classroom and are expected to seek out parents, administrators, and school colleagues as resources. Students are required to assemble an exhibition portfolio and participate in a mock interview in order to demonstrate their strengths as a teacher. 8 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 410.

ECEL418: Social and Cultural Context of Families and Communities (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with an understanding of how social, cultural, economic, and environmental influences shape children's development and learning. Students explore the relationships and role expectations among teacher, family, child, and community as they affect learning. They also examine methods for developing school/family partnerships and how to use community resources to support families. Students learn to take into account issues of child diversity as they create learning experiences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing.

ECEL421: Seminar II: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms (1 hour seminar)

Provides students with a forum to discuss the role of the teacher as teacher candidates take on full-time classroom responsibilities. Discussions focus on identifying and involving oneself in the professional field of elementary and middle school education, upholding and advocating for ethical standards, engaging in continuous and collaborative learning, and taking a critical stance to inform practice. Teacher candidates demonstrate that they can make and justify decisions based on their knowledge of central issues such as developmentally appropriate practice, culturally responsive learning and teaching, and the context of children's lives. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 412 or ECEL 413.

ECEL422: Integrating Elementary Curriculum and Assessment for Equity and Diversity (3 hours lecture)

In this course, students engage in reflective curriculum planning. They develop an integrated unit that incorporates state standards, differentiated instructional strategies, and appropriate adaptations for students with diverse learning styles and interests, students with disabilities, and English Language Learners. Students investigate and discuss issues related to their teaching and learning experiences focusing on inclusion practices, assessment, classroom management, and culturally responsive teaching. Students critically reflect on their teaching beliefs and explore teacher professionalism in the field of elementary education. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

ECEL427: Explorations: Science, Math, and Technology in the Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture)

Explores the nature of elementary science and math instruction, how to incorporate these disciplines in inclusive upper elementary/middle school classrooms . Hands-on/minds-on science and math activities and effective management techniques that engage children in the wonder and critical study of life, earth, physical (human-made), and space sciences will be examined. Stategies to adapt science and math learning to individual learners will be emphasized. Students will gain confidence and skills in the unifying concepts of science: systems, order, and organization; evidence, models and explanation; change, constancy, and measurement; evolution and equilibrium; and form and function. Mathematical concepts such as geometric thinking and spatial sense, chance and data analysis, number systems and number sense, patterns and algebraic thinking, and problem solving will also be explored. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200 and admission to Teacher Education Program.

EDFD220: Philosophical Orientation to Education (3 hours lecture)

Western philosophical heritage as related to the issues and responsibilities of American education. Comparative analysis of past and current ideological movements that influence moral, social, and educational decisions of parents, political leaders, and professional educators. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

EDFD264: Gender Issues in Education (3 hours lecture)

Examines the nature of gender, gender identity, gender roles and gender discrimination, and the influence of these on classrooms, schools and educational policy. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ENFL365: Gender and Sexuality in Film (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the ways in which gender and sexuality have been represented in one or more of the following modes of filmmaking: silent cinema, Hollywood cinema, independent and experimental cinema, documentary cinema, world cinema. Students will study the formal language of films - genre conventions, narrative treatments, and cinematic elements - in relation to gendered and sexual identities and feminist and queer civil rights struggles. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENFL 208 or ENFL 255 or ENFL 260 or ENFL 265.

ENGL207: World Literature: Voices of Tradition and Challenge (3 hours lecture)

Organized around the premise that writers have two fundamental ways of responding to the challenge of their culture, conformity or dissent, this course will present literary works in pairs that represent opposing ways of responding to the same subject. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, World Literature or General Humanities. Previous course ENLT 207 effective through Winter 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ENGL227: Queer Fiction (3 hours lecture)

A study of 20th and 21st Century fiction written by and about individuals of non-normative genders and sexualities. The cultural, theoretical, and historical forces that have informed this literature will be analyzed. Works may include texts by James Baldwin, Jeffrey Eugenides, Leslie Feinberg, Shyam Selvadurai, Dorothy Allison, and Alison Bechdel, among others. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL230: Images of Muslim Women in Twentieth Century Literature and Culture (3 hours lecture)

Through an exploration of writings by and about Muslim women in various parts of the world, students will be encouraged to develop an appreciation of the variety of aesthetic forms and narrative structures embodied therein. Representation in other cultural forms such as film will also be looked at to challenge monolithic assumptions. Previous course ENLT 230 effective through Winter 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL235: Contemporary Chinese Women's Literature (3 hours lecture)

Students of contemporary Chinese women's literature will analyze specific narrative techniques used in the representation of women in light of the literary inscriptions of place, family, history, gender, sexual politics, nationalism, and transnationalism. Students will examine how these narratives raise questions about Chinese origins, memories, desires and subjectivities in the age of globalization. Our primary focus will be on fiction written by women from mainland China, Taiwan, and Chinese diaspora. Previous course ENLT 235 effective through Winter 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL294: Women Poets (3 hours lecture)

Selected poets from Sappho through Emily Dickinson to Sylvia Plath examined in relation to contemporary women poets. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL301: The Novels of Toni Morrison (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on the fiction of Toni Morrison. Readings will include her published novels (from 1970 to the present), as well as selections from her critical writings. Such matters as the nature of her prose style, developments of her literary reputation, and place within the literary canon will be studied. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL308: Gender and Sexuality in Asian American Literature (3 hours lecture)

A study of Asian American literature and film through the lenses of gender and sexuality. Topics addressed will include major issues in Asian American literary studies, such as orientalism, intersections of race and gender, changing gender roles, the invention of "tradition," bachelor societies, queer sexuality, family, intergenerational issues, war, and colonialism and empire. Ethnic groups addressed might include Chinese American, Filipino American, Hmong American, Japanese American, Korean American, South Asian American, and Vietnamese American, among others. Cross-listed with Women's and Gender Studies, WMGS 308. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENGL 207 or ENFL 208 or ENGL 230 or ENGL 234 or ENGL 237 or ENGL 238 or ENGL 239 or ENGL 250 or ENGL 252 or ENGL 260 or ENGL 262 or ENGL 263 or ENGL 274 or ENWR 220.

ENLT372: Women Prose Writers (3 hours lecture)

Readings in the international fiction and non-fiction of women writers. The focus will be on such themes as the nature of the family, changing relationships between women and men, evolving concepts of the "feminine," the impact of colonialism on gender related issues (i.e. work and women's identity) and interrelationships between religion and women's lives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENTR201: The Entrepreneurial Mindset and Innovation (3 hours lecture)

This hands-on, highly interactive course is for all students interested in someday starting or owning a business or enterprise, or just exploring how entrepreneurs think and innovate. Students pursuing any major or discipline will benefit from the lessons and real-life stories of guest entrepreneurs. Students will explore creative problem solving and, in teams, develop and test problem solutions using an "opportunity discovery canvas" approach. Teams will receive guidance and feedback from instructors, mentors, and guest speakers. This course may be taken as a stand-alone course or as the first of three courses leading to a Certificate in Entrepreneurship. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ENTR290: Selected Topics in Entrepreneurship (2 hours lecture, 0.5 hours field/class)

An examination of topics not covered in existing entrepreneurship classes. Course topics will vary to reflect current issues, emerging cross disciplinary intersections and student interest. Through experiential activities, guest speakers, current readings and/or case studies students are exposed to emerging interdisciplinary topics within the broad area of entrepreneurship. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENTR 201.

ENTR301: Creating Your Startup Business Model (3 hours lecture)

This course takes students who have completed The Entrepreneurial Mindset and Innovation course deeper into the process of startup enterprise development. The course is structured to be delivered in a concentrated format and taken in the same semester as (followed by) Course III, Preparing to Pitch and Launch Your Startup. Teams of students will test their entrepreneurial ideas using a creative "lean canvas" approach to constructing a business model. Students will "get out of the building" and in a cyclical process of trial, feedback and retrial, modify or revise their models, and create prototypes or mockups of their proposed products or services. Each team will be assigned a mentor who is an experienced entrepreneur. The course will culminate in formal presentations by each team to a panel of instructors, mentors and entrepreneurs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENTR 201.

ENTR302: Preparing to Pitch and Launch Your Startup (3 hours lecture)

With this experiential course, students who have completed The Entrepreneurial Mindset and Innovation (Course I) and Creating Your Startup Business Model (Course II) will conclude the series and earn a Certificate in Entrepreneurship. The course is structured to be delivered in a concentrated format and taken in the same semester as (following) Course II. Teams of students will work with instructors and mentors to further refine and validate their business models and product/service offerings and prepare formal "pitches" for potential investors and partners. Students will explore in greater depth the financial feasibility of their models, develop a sales and marketing "roadmap" and consider the range of funding options. Guest speakers will include venture capitalists and investors as well as crowdfunding experts and successful entrepreneurs. The course will culminate in a formal juried pitch competition open to university students, faculty and staff. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENTR 201.

ENWR206: Workplace Writing (3 hours lecture)

This writing-intensive course focuses on the skills needed for effective communication in the workplace, with an emphasis on audience, genre, and use of technology. Students will learn how to construct persuasive proposals, executive summaries, and other professional writing documents. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENWR208: Digital Writing: Composing with Text, Image, and Sound (3 hours lecture)

This course explores how people write digitally, through multiple modalities and in varied contexts. Digital writers make use of all semiotic channels to communicate effectively among different groups and for different purposes, and thus students in this course will analyze and produce texts that combine alphabetic writing with audio, video, and images. Classical rhetorical principles such as kairos, invention, delivery, purpose, pathos, audience, and arrangement will provide the foundation for discussing how authors can effectively deploy messages in digital contexts. This course will balance production and analysis, with students creating and critiquing digital texts. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENWR350: Writing Women Safe: Writing, Rape Prevention, and Community Activism (3 hours lecture)

This course exposes students to writing-as-social-action through intensive study of the topic of sexual violence against women. Students will gain a broad-based understanding of community literacy and the role of writing outside school walls in order to fully explore how writing can function as an activist tool for the prevention of sexual violence. We will read broadly on the issue of sexual violence against women-analyzing depictions of rape in popular language, exploring how rape has been discussed in feminist theory and scholarship, and researching community-based and activist responses to rape and its prevention--in order to strengthen our own literacy practices towards prevention and awareness-raising. Students will be familiar with local, national, and international agencies that work to protect women from sexual violence and advocate for rape survivors. Students will develop activist writing projects that work to serve and further these existing efforts. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENGL 300, ENJR 210, ENJR 211, ENWR 250, ENWR 204, ENWR 205, ENWR 206, ENWR 207, or WMGS 201.

ENWR400: Community Writing: Theories, Practices, and Partnerships (3 hours lecture)

This course will explore the ways in which writing exists beyond the boundaries of what we have come to know as "writing or school". As we learn about the many manifestations and purposes of writing outside of school, we will ultimately reflect on more traditional ideas about school writing in order to think about the relationships between these varied contexts. We will explore writing practices that extend beyond academic discourse alone and into alternate genres that can bring communities together and create social and political change. This writing can take on many different forms: oral history projects; community-based creative writing collections; political manifestos; grant proposals; awareness-raising pamphlets and newsletters, and more. This course will offer a foundational understanding of how writing practices develop on the community level, distinct from school-based practices, and invite and expanded notion of what it could mean to write inside-and outside- of school. We will work as researchers and program builders in order to put some of these ideas into practical shape. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENJR 315 or ENJR 317 or ENWR 301 or ENWR 371 or ENWR 385 or ENGL 384 or departmental approval.

FCST205: Women in Contemporary Society (3 hours lecture)

Through this course students gain an understanding of how historical developments and social forces have shaped the status of women in America. Students engage in discussion about current concerns and role options available to today's women. Special attention is given to the construction of womanhood and the intersections of gender with race, ethnicity, class, and sexuality. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 or ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

FCST214: Child Development I (3 hours lecture)

This course takes a developmental approach to the study of young children from conception to age 10. For each developmental stage, students explore physical, socio-emotional, cognitive, and language domains. Developmental theories are woven into each part of the course and an emphasis is placed upon observational and research methodologies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

FCST314: Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture)

In this course students utilize a developmental approach to study adolescents (11-18 years) focusing on physical, cognitive and social development throughout this age period. Students examine the impact of family, peers, race, ethnicity, socio-cultural, and environmental influences on adolescents. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 214 and PSYC 101. Out-of-class interviews and/or observations are required.

FCST345: Gender in a Changing World (3 hours lecture)

Gender issues that exist in our society and cross-culturally. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 200. Restricted to majors within the Family and Child Studies department or departmental approval.

FREN283: Introduction to Women Authors of French-Speaking Africa (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the representations of women in post-colonial literature by French-speaking women authors from North and Sub-Saharan Africa (readings in English translation). Students will explore major works of fiction by women authors as they relate to gender and cultural identity. Readings include novels that deal with contemporary socio-cultural issues. Meets the Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets the World Languages and Cultures Requirement - World Cultures. 3 sh.

FRIN283: Introduction to Women Authors of French-Speaking Africa (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the representations of women in post-colonial literature by French-speaking women authors from North and Sub-Saharan Africa (readings in English translation). Students will explore major works of fiction by women authors as they relate to gender and cultural identity. Readings include novels that deal with contemporary socio-cultural issues. Meets the Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

GLQS100: Introduction to Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer (GLBTQ) Studies (3 hours lecture)

The course introduces students to current research in the study of same-sex individuals, relationships and communities and the social construction framework for analyzing contemporary gendered identities, sexualities, and the discourses and practices that maintain them. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Previous course GLQS 200 effective through Spring 2015. 3 sh.

GLQS201: Queer Identities in a Transforming World: The Trouble with Normal (3 hours lecture)

Building upon lessons from the required GLQS 100 course, this course will explore 'trans' from it Latin roots (meaning 'across' or 'beyond'), and relate it to queer as a position that allows for shifting identities. Students will engage in a critical analysis of gender, sexuality, race, class, and ecology, and synthesize methodologies from various disciplines in the humanities to gain a broad intersectional, multicultural and historical understanding of the term 'queer, and of queer and transgender studies. A range of textual and cinematic sources will be used to explore issues such as gender performance, the third sex, transgender issues, intersex issues, the political underpinnings and the transgressive nature of 'queer', the history of queer politics (from AIDS activism to the gay marriage issue), schisms within the LGBTQ political movements, queers and disability, issues of race, class and representation within the queer community, and non?human perspectives on queer. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GLQS 100.

GLQS301: Queer Theory (3 hours lecture)

The political and academic appropriation of the term "queer" over the last several years has marked a shift in the study of sexuality from a focus on supposedly essential categories as "gay" and "lesbian" to more fluid or non-heteronormative notions of sexual identity. Yet queer is a category still in the process of formation. This course provides a clear and concise explanation of queer theory, tracing it as part of an intriguing history of same-sex love over the last century. Blending insights from prominent theorists such as Judith Butler, Tim Dean, and David Halperin, among others, while incorporating provocative and highly contentious debates around sadomasochism, fetishism, and transgenderism, we argue that queer theory's challenge is to create new ways of thinking, not only about fixed sexual identities such as heterosexual and homosexual, but also about other supposedly essential notions such as sexuality and gender. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GLQS 100 and GLQS 201.

GLQS302: Selected Topics in Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies (3 hours lecture)

This special topics course examines topics, themes, issues, motifs, theories or critical approaches with an interdisciplinary orientation related to Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies, and will explore a topic which is either not covered in the curriculum or which deserves more in-depth treatment than is possible in an existing course (such as Queer National Cinemas, Queer Science Fiction, Queering the Sciences, etc). The specific topic will be announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits if topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GLQS 201.

GNHU283: Women, Gender, and Sexuality in the Ancient World (3 hours lecture)

This course uses women, gender, and sexuality to model a broad, cross-disciplinary, and issue-oriented approach to ancient societies. Students will examine cultural and historical objects, such as historical and philosophical works, inscriptions, and graffiti. They will view monuments and artifacts. They will learn how to approach complex cultural objects and understand how social constructions of gender affected and reflected the lives of women and men in ancient Greece, Rome, and the Near East. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 115 or GNHU 151 or ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

GNHU345: Imaging Medieval and Early Modern Women (3 hours lecture)

This course explores representations of medieval and early modern women, gender, and sexuality in literary, artistic, and musical media that were produced in continental Europe. Paying particular attention to works - e.g., manuscript illuminations, songs, texts - produced by, for, and about women this course transcends disciplinary boundaries and draws on a range of methodological approaches. 3 hours lecture. Cross-listed with WMGS 345. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or WMGS 201; or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201 or GNHU 202 or WMGS 201.

GNHU383: Women in Antiquity (3 hours lecture)

Women in the ancient world and their contributions to history, literature, philosophy and the arts. Emphasis on Greco-Roman civilization, with comparative study of other ancient cultures. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 and GNHU 201 or HONP 101 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201 or GNHU 202 or GNHU 285 or WMGS 201 or departmental approval.

HIST215: Women in American History (3 hours lecture)

The changing role and status of women in American society from colonial times to the present. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

HIST309: Feminist Ideas in Western Thought (3 hours lecture)

History of feminist ideas and theories about women and womanhood. Students examine important theoretical literature in Europe and America from 18th century to present. Original texts of Wollstonecroft, Fuller, Mill, and Freud will be considered against their socio-historic milieu. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST314: Women and Migration (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on female migrants from the late nineteenth century to the present. Using an interdisciplinary approach with an emphasis on historical studies, it considers issues of work, family, sexuality, and identity formation for migrant women past and present. Questions to explore include: what distinguishes the experiences of migration for women; what are the continuities and differences for women across time, ethnicity, and geography; how do historians, sociologists, anthropologists, and others, as well as the migrants themselves, understand female migration; what do women gain and lose through migration; and why a gendered approach to migration studies is crucial. Cross listed with Women's and Gender Studies, WMGS 314. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 102; or HIST 100 and HIST 117 or 118.

HIST334: Women in the Muslim World: A History of Representations (3 hours lecture)

A survey of writings by and about Muslim women examined historiographically. We examine conventional wisdom about Muslim women through the ages, and how this "wisdom" was constructed: Who wrote about Muslim women? When? How? What purposes have these writings served at different times and places since the inception of Islam and during the course of its 1,500 year history. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Passing grade in the following: HIST 100; HIST 117 or 118; HIST 103 or 105 or 106; 108 or 109 or 114 or 116 or 128 or 129 or 131 or 132 or 133.

HLTH101: Personal Health Issues (3 hours lecture)

Personal Health Issues examines health through six interrelated dimensions: physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, interpersonal and social, and environmental. This course examines how health choices impact society and the health of a community. Additionally, health policies and societal health issues are examined for their impact on the individual. This course emphasizes contemporary health issues using the national initiative Health People 2010 as a framework. Assessing health status, increasing health competencies to enhance decision-making skills, eliciting health-promoting behaviors, and interpreting existing and proposed social actions that ultimately affect individual, family, community and environmental health are central focuses of this course. 3 sh.

HLTH207: Safety, Accidents and Emergency Care. Starting Winter 2016: Injury Prevention and Emergency Care (3 hours lecture)

Provides for study of major safety areas including transportation, public safety, industrial and home safety. Emergency health care, first aid treatment, and preventive measures are considered in the context of individual, agency and institutional responsibilities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 102.

HLTH210: Consumer Health (3 hours lecture)

Interpretation of individual economic activity as it relates to health service and health products. Includes analysis of factors influencing consumer health attitudes and behavior. 3 sh.

HLTH213: Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of licit as well as illicit drug use in contemporary society from the perspective of selected biomedical and psychosocial disciplines. Examines the effects of drugs on the individual and society in the context of changing social conditions and technological developments. Analyzes complex nature of the drug problem and rehabilitative and preventive measures and tentative solutions to this important aspect of human existence. 3 sh.

HLTH220: Mental Health (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of human emotional adjustment throughout the life cycle from biomedical and psychosocial perspectives. The factors that foster the development of emotional and mental well-being and the forces that contribute to the breakdown of human adjustment capabilities are identified and analyzed in light of research and clinical literature. Special attention is given to the strategies for the prevention of mental disorders and promotion of mental health. 3 sh.

HLTH290: Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

Students will explore many interacting cultural, personal and health factors relating to human sexual development, attitudes, and behaviors. Historical, anthropological, biological/physiological, socio-cultural and psychological factors will be introduced to encourage a broad perspective. Discussion of differing philosophical, ethical and moral positions will also aid students in making a critical assessment of intimate human relationships and acquaint them with criteria and processes for understanding themselves as sexual beings. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

HLTH295: Sexuality Education in the Schools (3 hours lecture)

Focus on sexuality content and teaching methodology for sex education K-12 in schools. Based on NJ Content Standards for Sexuality Education. 3 sh.

HLTH307: The Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of diseases, their etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Includes a review of causation theories and incidence patterns and focuses on major degenerative, neoplastic, metabolic, immunologic, and infectious diseases. Attention is given to prevention and control measures with an emphasis on the role of selected health/medical resources in disease management. Offered as HLTH 307 through Fall 2015. To become HLTH 208 effective Winter 2016. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 105 or HPEM 150 or ATTR 201 and at least one 200-level course in HLTH, HPEM, or ATTR.

HLTH314: Public Health Aspects of Alcohol Abuse (3 hours lecture)

Examines the impact of alcohol abuse on public health. Society's attempts to diminish the impact are also explored. Includes study of effects of alcohol abuse on the family and workplace; prevention modalities and rehabilitation programs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 213 or HLTH 215.

HLTH330: Foundations of Health Education. Starting Winter 2016: Health Education Methods (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of the scientific, social, behavioral, educational, and legal foundations of health education. Traces the evolution and interprets the impact of related professions on school, community, and allied health education. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Health. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 204.

HLTH375: Women's Health (3 hours lecture)

This course offers perspectives on women's health and health care, focusing predominately on the United States but with some attention to international and global issues. Students will receive an overview of the health status and major health concerns of women. Acute and chronic problems will be addressed across the lifespan. This course includes fieldwork experience. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or WMGS 102 or departmental approval.

HLTH411: School Health and Community Services (3 hours lecture)

Provides for an in-depth understanding of the school health program and community services. Includes study of school and health services, healthful school environment, and health education and community health services. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 330.

HLTH430: Health Counseling. Starting Winter 2016: Counseling Skills for Public Health Professionals (3 hours lecture)

Course focuses on factors influencing health and illness behavior with implications for behavioral intervention in health care. Included are the intervention strategies of prevention, crisis intervention, postvention and compliance, and the intervention techniques of assessment, interviewing, counseling skills and small group dynamics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 220 or HLTH 222 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 330.

HONP210: Honors Seminar in Science (3 hours seminar, 2 hours lab)

Interdisciplinary course in the natural and physical sciences consisting of seminars and laboratory experience. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: For Honors Program students only or by permission of instructor.

HONP211: Honors Seminar in Contemporary Issues in Science (3 hours seminar)

Interdisciplinary course in the natural and physical sciences applying the scientific method, scientific data analysis, reasoning and logic to selected contemporary issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: For Honors Program students only or by permission of instructor.

HPEM150: Principles and Practice of Emergency Care (3 hours lecture)

Provides for study of emergency care management. Provides knowledge and skills for teaching principles and practices of emergency care in a school or adult fitness setting. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: Exercise Science (ESCI) or Physical Education w/ conc: Adult Fitness (PEAF) majors only or departmental approval.

JURI376: Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the philosophical basis of legal doctrines as they apply to women and feminist issues. The course will explore the legal arguments feminists have made for social and political equality. It will also examine whether gender bias is built into traditional jurisprudential theories. Women's rights and women's legal status in politics, employment, education, and the family will be explored. Cross-listed with PHIL 376 and WMGS 376. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or WMGS 200 or WMGS 201.

JUST316: Victimology (3 hours lecture)

Victimology is the scientific study of victims including the relationship between the victim and offender, the victim and the criminal justice system, and the victim with other societal institutions. The goal of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the subject of victimology in the context of Criminology and Women's and Gender studies. The course will be presented in three parts: Research and theory on victimization, Exploration of special topics in victimology, and Historical and Contemporary practical responses to victimization. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201 or WMGS 301 or departmental approval.

JUST320: Women and Prison (3 hours lecture)

This course will take a comprehensive view of the issues that bring women in contact with the criminal justice system and correctional institutions. Students will discuss the historical legacy of female incarceration in Europe and America. They will discover that the demographic intersections of gender, race, class and gender orientation play a major role in sentencing outcomes. Gender responsive programming as well as role model programs in the US, Canada and Europe will be discussed. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

JUST355: Human Trafficking (3 hours lecture)

The goal of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of global human trafficking, including extent, causes, impact, perpetrators, victims and responses. In addition to an overview of the global issues we will examine the multifaceted needs of trafficking survivors, and legal and policy approaches to reducing the problem. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201 and/or departmental permission.

JUST403: Seminar on Gender and Crime (3 hours lecture)

The goal of this course is to provide an upper-level, trans-disciplinary overview of ways that gender shapes individuals' experiences with the criminal justice system as workers, offenders and victims. Emphasis will be placed on the examination of structural disadvantage, the gendered nature of criminological theoretical perspectives, and the victim/offender dichotomy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 301 or JUST 310 or by departmental approval.

LALS205: Image and Identity: Representation of Latin American Women in Film and Fiction (3 hours lecture)

An analysis of representations of women in film and fiction with a special focus on the process of identity construction. Representations of women from pre-Columbian times to the present will be studied in relation to their use in the perpetuation of ideologies. Intended as an overview of the social history of women in Latin America. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

LAWS391: Women and the Law (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to and evaluation of the changing patterns of gender-based laws in the United States in terms of the preferences they reflect and the rationales used to justify them. Emphasis on issues which impact upon women's rights, relevant case law which impacts upon the roles and rights of women, and legislation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or WMGS 102.

LNGN255: Language and Gender (3 hours lecture)

A sociolinguistic study of the interaction of language with sex and gender. Course includes a survey of the literature on language and gender plus practical experience in collecting and analyzing linguistic data. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

MTHM201: Mathematics in Elementary Schools I (3 hours lecture)

This course is intended for undergraduate students seeking certification to teach early childhood and elementary school (P-3, K-6). The course will provide prospective early childhood and elementary school teachers with opportunities to develop deep, connected understandings of (1) content included in the Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Number & Operations strands of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM), as well as (2) factors that influence student learning of that content, (3) characteristics of instruction that are effective in promoting development of student understanding of the concepts from operations and algebraic thinking and number and operations included in the Pre-K through grade 6 mathematics curriculum, and (4) research on student learning of Pre-K through grade 6 operations and algebraic thinking and number and operations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200.

MTHM302: Mathematics in Elementary Schools II (3 hours lecture)

The course is intended for undergraduate students seeking certification to teach early childhood and elementary school (P-3, K-6). The course will provide prospective early childhood and elementary school teachers with opportunities to develop deep, connected understandings of (1) content included in the Geometry, Measurement & Data, and Fraction Operations strands of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM), as well as (2) factors that influence Pre-K through grade 6 student learning of that content, (3) characteristics of classroom instruction that are effective in promoting development of student understanding of elementary geometry, measurement and data, and fraction operations, and (4) research on student learning of elementary school geometry, measurement and data, and fraction operations. Previous course MTHM 202 effective through Spring 2011. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200 and MTHM 201.

NUFD182: Nutrition (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to give students a general knowledge of the components of the food we eat, the nutrients necessary for a healthy life, the functions of nutrients and the interrelationships and metabolism of nutrients. The factors which influence the recommended dietary intake of nutrients, and theories and guidelines for screening nutrition risk and disease and prevention are presented. 3 sh.

PHIL339: Contemporary Continental Philosophy (3 hours lecture)

This course surveys the four main movements of the continental (European) philosophical tradition: (1) 19th century German philosophy, (2) Marxism/critical theory, (3) phenomenology/existentialism, and (4) post-structuralism/postmodernism. This philosophical tradition runs from the 19th Century to the present day. Continental philosophy stands in contrast to the dominant, Anglo-American, "analytic" philosophical tradition. This course gives students the opportunity to examine the ways in which continental philosophers approach issues in the core subfields of philosophy, such as epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, political philosophy, and aesthetics. Students will also have the opportunity to explore similarities to and differences from the analytic philosophical tradition. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 202 or PHIL 208 or PHIL 231 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 264 or PHIL 266 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 271 or PHIL 280 or PHIL 288 or PHIL 290 or PHIL 295 or GLQS 201 or WMGS 301.

PHIL376: Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the philosophical basis of legal doctrines as they apply to women and feminist issues. The course will explore the legal arguments feminists have made for social and political equality. It will also examine whether gender bias is built into traditional jurisprudential theories. Women's rights and women's legal status in politics, employment, education, and the family will be explored. Cross-listed with JURI 376 and WMGS 376. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or WMGS 200 or WMGS 201.

POLS214: Women in Politics (3 hours lecture)

The role of women in the functioning of the American political system. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

POLS436: Political Science Washington, D.C., Internship

In this course students intern in Washington, D.C., at governmental offices, interest groups, party and electoral organizations, law and lobbying firms or other political organizations. Students' academic learning is assessed by faculty, and their work performance is evaluated by their placement supervisor. Students may receive up to 7.0 credits in Political Science and up to 8.0 credits in a corequisite Cooperative Education course. Cross listed with Women's and Gender Studies, WMGS 436. 1 - 7 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.

PSYC101: Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course is an introduction to the study of human behavior and surveys major topics within the diverse discipline of psychology. Topics covered will come from each of four core areas offered by the psychology department: Social/Applied (e.g., Social, Industrial-Organizational, Health), Biological Basis of Behavior (e.g., Physiology, Perception, Motivation/Emotion, Comparative Animal Behavior), Cognition (e.g., Learning and Memory, Conditioning and Learning, Cognition, Language) and Personality (e.g., Personality, Abnormal, Development). Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science for non-psychology majors only. 3 sh.

PSYC265: Psychology of Women (3 hours lecture)

The course will investigate contemporary issues in the psychology of women (an opportunity for original research will be provided). Theoretical positions and recent research in the area will be examined. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

PSYC294: Psychology of Leadership: Theory and Application (3 hours lecture)

This is a service learning course that allows students to develop a sophisticated understanding of leadership from both a theoretical and practical point of view. Students receive in depth information on historical and contemporary psychological theories of leadership. They participate in assessments of their own leadership competencies and capabilities based on theory and research. They then learn to apply, assess, compare, and critically evaluate theory, research, and assessment tools through a multi-week project with a community partner in which they have a chance to observe and practice leadership. Students combine theory and practice through a series of critical reflections that result in students articulating their learnings about leadership, the practice of leadership in the civic environment, and themselves as leaders. This course is not recommended for students who successfully completed PSYC 120. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 or ENWR 105 or CMST 101 or HONP 100.

READ399: Early Literacy Development and Instruction (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces future teachers to language and literacy development and instruction in preschool through 3rd grade classrooms. Students learn the components and stages of literacy development from emergent literacy through reading fluency, and examine the cognitive, linguistic, sociocultural and instructional influences on this process. Students carry out an assessment of a child's reading and build a repertoire of culturally responsive teaching practices that address the five essential components of reading instruction identified by the National Reading Panel (2000) (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). They practice standards-based lesson planning and design instructional adaptations for English Language Learners. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

READ408: Literacy in the Elementary Grades (3 hours lecture)

In this course, prospective elementary teachers continue their exploration of key theories and methods for teaching literacy, with an emphasis on the intermediate grades. They focus on reading comprehension, vocabulary development, writing instruction, literacy across the content areas, and the use of technology to develop a breadth of pedagogical knowledge. Particular attention is given to developing expertise in differentiated instructional planning that meets a diverse range of learners, including English Language Learners, students with learning disabilities, struggling readers, and advanced students. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: READ 399.

RELG230: Wicca and Neopaganism (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the many new religions in Europe and the United states that focus on nature worship and the practice of magic and frequently claim to be recreating ancient, pre-Christian religions. This course will introduce students to the variety of religions co-existing under the Wicca and Neopaganism labels, examine their shared beliefs and practices, and debate the many controversies that arise around them. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG267: Women and Religion (3 hours lecture)

Focuses on women's own experience in religions and the various perspectives of women held by both Eastern and Western religious traditions. The course deals with questions such as the nature of women, patriarchy and religion, and roles of women in religions. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Religious Studies. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG304: Feminist Theology and Spirituality (3 hours lecture)

This course examines primary religious documents, their traditional interpretations, and recent feminist interpretations of these documents. It considers feminist criticisms of traditional Western religious thought as it relates to women. It also explores recent developments in feminist theology, such as female-centered religious ritual and practice and eco-feminist/creation spirituality. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 221 or RELG 240 or RELG 246 or RELG 250 or RELG 252 or RELG 254 or RELG 256 or RELG 267.

RUIN297: Women in Russian Literature

This course will examine the roles, status, identity and problems of female characters in representative works of Russian literature from the medieval period to the present. It will trace the development of mythic images about "Mother Russia," study the cultural messages of classic nineteenth century Russian heroines and explore adaptations in the traditional appreciation of Russian women in the early Soviet period as well as contemporary works. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

SOCI208: Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on men and masculine identities in the United States and other countries. It reviews how masculine identities are constructed in everyday lives and how societies shape such identities. In this class, we will examine the construction of masculinity in different areas such as work, school, sports, family and other social relationships. We also explore the diverse experiences of masculinities based on race, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 104 or SOCI 106 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201.

SOCI426: Sociology of Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

The course examines theoretical and empirical work in the sociology of sexuality. It seeks to understand the social foundations of sexual behavior and sexual identity. It explores the relationship between sexuality and politics, focusing on current as well as historical conflicts over sexual behavior and ideologies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SOCI430: Sociology of Gender (3 hours lecture)

The social determinants of differences between women and men and the effect of sex role differentiation in the social institutions of marriage and family, the economy and work situation, formal education, health, mass media, and religion; special emphasis is placed on the impact of social change on sex roles in contemporary society. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 301 or SOCI 304 or SOCI 309 or SOCI 311 or SOCI 312 or departmental approval.

SPAN473: Sexual Subversion in Contemporary Hispanic Literature and Film (3 hours lecture)

This course examines various representations of sexual subversion in selected works and films of Spanish, Latin American, and Caribbean writers and film directors. It analyzes the role of the body and subversive sexualities in challenging politically imposed sexual norms and socially encoded gender practices. Topics include homosexuality and dissidence, transgender and performance, lesbianism, female bonding, and transsexualism. Selections from Allende, Goytisolo, Falcon, Arenas, Umpierre, Riera, Almodovar, Gutierrez Alea, Paris,and Bollain, among others. Taught in Spanish. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SPAN 361 or SPAN 363.

WMGS102: Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces the student to the broad and interdisciplinary field known as Women's and Gender Studies. It is designed to make students aware of the new discoveries in feminist and gender studies research and to focus on many aspects of the female experience and the social construction of gendered identities. The course is designed to help students understand different theories and methodologies in diverse disciplines and to treat areas such as literature, history, psychology and the arts through an issue-oriented approach. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

WMGS200: Transnational Feminisms (3 hours lecture)

This course will interrogate the concept and practice of feminism from various locations outside of the U.S. Students will examine the political, cultural and socio-economic structures that promote or inhibit activism on women's lives and issues. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - K2 Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Previous course WMGS 303 effective through Winter 2011. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 102.

WMGS201: Inventing Feminism (3 hours lecture)

How did feminism begin in Europe and America? This course studies the birth of feminism as an international political movement and explores its growth in response to Western social developments from 1750 to the mid-twentieth century. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 102.

WMGS208: Men and Masculinities (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on men and masculine identities in the United States and other countries. It reviews how masculine identities are constructed in everyday lives and how societies shape such identities. In this class, we will examine the construction of masculinity in different areas such as work, school, sports, family and other social relationships. We also explore the diverse experiences of masculinities based on race, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 113 or SOCI 201 or SOCI 204 or SOCI 206.

WMGS301: Feminist Theory in Transnational Contexts (3 hours lecture)

This course examines a wide variety of feminist theories which illustrate the many ways in which issues of gender can be interpreted. Recognizing that gendered identities are molded by such factors as class, race, sexual orientation and national identity, this course explores the issues of difference among women and the role of theory in conceptualizing such differences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 200 or WMGS 201 or WMGS 208 or SOCI 208.

WMGS302: Selected Topics in Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies (3 hours lecture)

The exploration of a topic related to Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies which is either not covered in the curriculum or which deserves more in-depth treatment than is possible in an existing course. The specific topic will be announced each time the course is offered. May be repeated two times (as long as the topic is different) for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 200 or WMGS 201 or WMGS 208 or SOCI 208.

WMGS308: Gender and Sexuality in Asian American Literature (3 hours lecture)

A study of Asian American literature and film through the lenses of gender and sexuality. Topics addressed will include major issues in Asian American literary studies, such as orientalism, intersections of race and gender, changing gender roles, the invention of "tradition," bachelor societies, queer sexuality, family, intergenerational issues, war, and colonialism and empire. Ethnic groups addressed might include Chinese American, Filipino American, Hmong American, Japanese American, Korean American, South Asian American, and Vietnamese American, among others. Cross-listed with English, ENGL 308. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENGL 207 or ENFL 208 or ENGL 230 or ENGL 234 or ENGL 237 or ENGL 238 or ENGL 239 or ENGL 250 or ENGL 252 or ENGL 260 or ENGL 262 or ENGL 263 or ENGL 274 or ENWR 220.

WMGS314: Women and Migration (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on female migrants from the late nineteenth century to the present. Using an interdisciplinary approach with an emphasis on historical studies, it considers issues of work, family, sexuality, and identity formation for migrant women past and present. Questions to explore include: what distinguishes the experiences of migration for women; what are the continuities and differences for women across time, ethnicity, and geography; how do historians, sociologists, anthropologists, and others, as well as the migrants themselves, understand female migration; what do women gain and lose through migration, and why a gendered approach to migration studies is crucial. Cross listed with History, HIST 314. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 102; or HIST 100 and HIST 117 or 118.

WMGS316: Victimology (3 hours lecture)

Victimology is the scientific study of victims including the relationship between the victim and offender, the victim and the criminal justice system, and the victim with other societal institutions. The goal of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the subject of victimology in the context of Criminology and Women's and Gender Studies. The course will be presented in three parts: Research and theory on victimization, Exploration of special topics in victimology, and Historical and Contemporary practical responses to victimization. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 200 or JUST 201 or WMGS 301 or departmental approval.

WMGS345: Imaging Medieval and Early Modern Women (3 hours lecture)

This course explores representations of medieval and early modern women, gender, and sexuality in literary, artistic, and musical media that were produced in continental Europe. Paying particular attention to works - e.g., manuscript illuminations, songs, texts - produced by, for, and about women this course transcends disciplinary boundaries and draws on a range of methodological approaches. 3 hours lecture. Cross-listed with GHNU 345. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or WMGS 201; or departmental approval.

WMGS350: Writing Women Safe: Writing, Rape Prevention, and Community Activism (3 hours lecture)

This course exposes students to writing-as-social-action through intensive study of the topic of sexual violence against women. Students will gain a broad-based understanding of community literacy and the role of writing outside school walls in order to fully explore how writing can function as an activist tool for the prevention of sexual violence. We will read broadly on the issue of sexual violence against women-analyzing depictions of rape in popular language, exploring how rape has been discussed in feminist theory and scholarship, and researching community-based and activist responses to rape and its prevention-in order to strengthen our own literacy practices towards prevention and awareness-raising. Students will be familiar with local, national, and international agencies that work to protect women from sexual violence and advocate for rape survivors. Students will develop activist writing projects that work to serve and further these existing efforts. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENGL 300, ENJR 210, ENJR 211, ENWR 204, ENWR 205, ENWR 206, ENWR 207, ENWR 250, or WMGS 201.

WMGS355: Human Trafficking (3 hours lecture)

The goal of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of global human trafficking, including extent, causes, impact, perpetrators, victims and responses. In addition to an overview of the global issues we will examine the multifaceted needs of trafficking survivors, and legal and policy approaches to reducing the problem. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 201 or WMGS 200 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental permission.

WMGS376: Feminist Jurisprudence (3 hours lecture)

An examination of the philosophical basis of legal doctrines as they apply to women and feminist issues. The course will explore the legal arguments feminists have made for social and political equality. It will also examine whether gender bias is built into traditional jurisprudential theories. Women's rights and women's legal status in politics, employment, education, and the family will be explored. Cross-listed with PHIL 376 and JURI 376. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or WMGS 200 or WMGS 201.

WMGS401: Independent Study: Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies

This course involves advanced research on a topic of particular interest to the students that goes beyond the scope of available courses in Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies. Students are required to hand in an extensive paper documenting the results of their research. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 301 and approval of the WMGS Director.

WMGS402: Sexuality, and Women's Studies

Each participant completes an individual project that is either (a) research on an approved topic or (b) description and analysis of a long-term field experience. With faculty facilitator, students discuss research strategies, issues, and work in progress. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 102, WMGS 201, WMGS 301 and 6 additional hours in the major.

WMGS403: Seminar on Gender and Crime (3 hours lecture)

The goal of this course is to provide an upper-level, trans-disciplinary overview of ways that gender shapes individuals' experiences with the criminal justice system as workers, offenders and victims. Emphasis will be placed on the examination of structural disadvantage, the gendered nature of criminological theoretical perspectives, and the victim/offender dichotomy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 301 or JUST 310 or by departmental approval.

WMGS410: Cooperative Education: Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies

Academic study integrated with supervised internship in an organization, agency, or business that addresses women's issues or issues of gender or sexuality. Part-time (20 hours per week). Required individual meetings with faculty advisor supplement experiential component, and include discussion of field work experience, connection between feminist/gender studies theories and practice, issues of access and diversity, civic responsibility, and career options. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 102, WMGS 301 and at least one other WMGS course; minimum GPA of 3.0; approval of WMGS director.

WMGS436: Washington, D.C. Internship

In this course students will intern in Washington, D.C., at governmental offices, interest groups, party and electoral organizations, law and lobbying firms or other political organizations. Students' academic learning is assessed by faculty and their work performance is evaluated by their placement supervisor. Students may receive up to 7.0 credits in Women's and Gender Studies and up to 8.0 credits in a corequisite Cooperative Education course. Cross listed with Political Science, POLS 436. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: WMGS 102 plus two Women's and Gender Studies electives relevant to the intended placement (subject to the Women's and Gender Studies director's approval) and a minimum 3.0 G.P.A. in the major or minor.

WMGS481: The Legal Rights of Women (3 hours lecture)

This course will include some historical background for clearer understanding of what the changes in laws mean for women and men. Discussion and study of the effect of affirmative action, civil rights legislation and titles VI and IX will be included. Legal rights in the areas of education, employment, finances and credit, property ownership, marriage and divorce, health care, pensions and criminal law will be covered. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Previous course COUN 481 effective through Summer 2011. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Departmental approval.