General Humanities Major (Combined B.A./M.A.T with Teacher Certification in Grades K- 6 and Teacher of Students with Disabilities.) - Undergraduate - 2015 University Catalog

The Dual Degree Dual Certification Program is a 5-year Program that leads to teacher certification in elementary education (K-6) teacher certification in Teacher of Student Disabilities, a baccalaureate degree in General Humanities and master's degree. Interested students must apply to and be admitted to the Teacher Education Program as an undergraduate. Students must successfully complete the undergraduate portion of the program in order to be admitted to the Graduate School and complete the one year master's portion of the program.

Please visit the Teacher Education website for the required undergraduate professional sequence of courses, overall course outline, and other important Program requirements, guidelines and procedures. Students are also strongly advised to review the Teacher Education Program Handbook.

A minimum of 120 semester hours of coursework is required for the baccalaureate degree. For this program, a student must complete the baccalaureate degree with a minimum 3.25 overall GPA and a minimum 3.25 major GPA.


GENERAL HUMANITIES MAJOR

Complete 2 requirement(s):

  1. MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

    Complete 37 semester hours including the following 2 requirement(s):

    1. GENERAL HUMANITIES COURSES

      Complete the following 4 courses:

      GNHU 201 General Humanities I (to 1400) (3 hours lecture) 3
      GNHU 202 General Humanities II (from 1400) (3 hours lecture) 3
      GNHU 285 Mythology (3 hours lecture) 3
      GNHU 499 Senior Humanities Seminar (4 hours seminar) 4
    2. GENERAL HUMANITIES ELECTIVE COURSES

      Complete the following 5 requirement(s):

      1. HISTORY ELECTIVES

        Complete 2 of the following 3 requirements for 6 semester hours:

        1. EARLIER WESTERN HISTORY

          Complete 0 semester hours to 3 semester hours from the following:

          1.  

            GNHU 283 Women, Gender, and Sexuality in the Ancient World (3 hours lecture) 3
            GNHU 332 Selected Topics in Ancient History (Greece, Rome, W. Asia, N. Africa, Europe) (3 hours lecture) 3
            GNHU 345 Imaging Medieval and Early Modern Women (3 hours lecture) 3
            GNHU 351 The City in Antiquity (3 hours lecture) 3
            GNHU 355 Alexander the Great: Legend and Legacy (3 hours lecture) 3
            GNHU 357 The Roman Republic (3 hours lecture) 3
            GNHU 358 Cleopatra (3 hours lecture) 3
            GNHU 360 The Roman Empire (3 hours lecture) 3
            GNHU 361 Selected Topics in Mediterranean Archaeology (3 hours lecture) 3
            GNHU 362 Field Methods in Mediterranean Archaeology 3-6
            GNHU 381 Africa in Classical Antiquity (3 hours lecture) 3
            GNHU 384 Introduction to Roman Law (3 hours lecture) 3
            HIST 322 Medieval European Civilization 450-1350 (3 hours lecture) 3
            HIST 419 Age of Renaissance, 1350-1517 (3 hours lecture) 3
          2. 1 course may be used from the following list

            GNHU 281 Greek Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
            HIST 281 Greek Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
          3. 1 course may be used from the following list

            GNHU 282 Roman Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
            HIST 282 Roman Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. LATER WESTERN HISTORY

          Complete 0 semester hours to 3 semester hours from the following:

          HIST 204 The Second World War (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 212 Social History of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 213 Economic History of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 214 Diplomatic History of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 215 Women in American History (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 217 History of Black Americans (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 218 Political History of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 219 Sport in History (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 221 Europe's Conquest of the Americas, 1415-1763 (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 222 Economic History of Europe (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 309 Feminist Ideas in Western Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 310 Immigrant in American History (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 312 Historical Geography of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 315 War in History (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 323 History of Russia to 1917 (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 324 Russia Since 1917 (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 326 Modern German History (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 327 History of France Since 1789 (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 328 Conflict in Modern Ireland (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 329 History of England to 1714 (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 331 History of England 1714-1914 (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 411 Intellectual History of the United States (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 415 European Social History (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 420 The Reformation Era, 1500-1650 (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 422 Studies in Enlightenment History (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 424 Diplomatic History of Europe (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 426 The Nazi Third Reich (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 427 The Holocaust, 1939-1945 (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 433 American Colonial History 1607-1763 (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 435 The Union in Crisis 1820-1877 (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 436 America in the Gilded Age (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 437 American Society in the 20th Century (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 438 America in the Sixties: The Crisis of Consensus Liberalism (3 hours lecture) 3
          POLS 216 Urban Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
          POLS 312 Black Politics in America (3 hours lecture) 3
          POLS 318 The American Presidency (3 hours lecture) 3
          POLS 339 Contemporary Western European Politics (3 hours lecture) 3
          SOCI 207 Social Structure of American Society (3 hours lecture) 3
        3. NON-WESTERN HISTORY

          Complete 0 semester hours to 3 semester hours from the following:

          HIST 108 Introduction to African Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 109 Introduction to Islamic Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 114 Early Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 115 History of Puerto Rico (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 116 Modern Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 128 Pre-Modern Japan: A History of Japan to the Meiji Restoration (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 129 Modern Japan: A History of Japan From the Meiji Through the Showa (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 131 Introduction to Indian Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 132 Introduction to Chinese Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 133 Modern Chinese Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 223 Communist Revolution in China (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 330 Chinese Social History Through Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 333 History of Brazil (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 334 Women in the Muslim World: A History of Representations (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 416 Church and State in Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 430 Revolutions in Latin American History (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 431 Development of Indian Character and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
          HIST 432 Development of Japanese Character and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
          POLS 204 Government and Politics of Africa (3 hours lecture) 3
          POLS 206 Government and Politics of China and Japan (3 hours lecture) 3
          POLS 342 Government and Politics of the Middle East (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. PHILOSOPHY/RELIGIOUS STUDIES ELECTIVES

        Complete the following 2 requirement(s):

        1. PHILOSOPHY

          Complete 3 semester hours from the following:

          1.  

            GNHU 454 Lucretius and Ancient Science (3 hours lecture) 3
            JUST 360 Rights, Liberties and American Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
            LAWS 391 Women and the Law (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 102 Ethics (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 202 Ethics and Business (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 204 Philosophical Issues in Biomedical Ethics (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 206 Philosophical Issues in Law and Justice (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 212 Social and Political Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 231 American Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 233 Contemporary Philosophers (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 237 Asian Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 239 Existentialism (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 260 Philosophies of Art (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 262 Philosophy of Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 264 Critical Reasoning and Arguments (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 266 Philosophy of Science (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 270 Philosophy of Mind (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 271 Philosophy of Sport (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 280 Philosophy of Cyberspace (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 290 Fields of Philosophy: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 295 Periods and Movements: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 297 Periods and Movements: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 310 Knowledge, Belief and Truth (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 312 Existence and Reality (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 316 Philosophy of Law (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 330 Philosophy and Death (3 hours seminar) 3
            PHIL 331 History of Philosophy: Ancient Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 333 History of Philosophy: Modern Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 334 Theoretical and Applied Ethics (3 hours seminar) 3
            PHIL 335 Nineteenth Century Philosophy (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 390 Fields of Philosophy: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 395 Periods and Movements: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 397 Periods and Movements: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 424 Seminar in Philosophy (3 hours seminar) 3
            POLS 215 Ethnic Politics in America (3 hours lecture) 3
            POLS 307 American Political Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
            POLS 323 American Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties (3 hours lecture) 3
          2. 1 course may be used from the following list

            JURI 324 Legal Reasoning (3 hours lecture) 3
            PHIL 324 Legal Reasoning (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. RELIGIOUS STUDIES

          Complete 3 semester hours from the following:

          1. RELG 200 Old Testament: Genesis to Joshua (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 202 Old Testament: Joshua to Daniel (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 204 New Testament: Jesus and the Gospels (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 206 New Testament: Paul and the Early Church (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 207 Religious Texts in America: Women (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 213 Buddhism (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 214 Classical Texts of Asian Religions (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 215 Hinduism (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 217 Taoism (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 218 Death, Dying and Afterlife (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 221 Religion and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 223 Religion in North America (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 225 Religion and Social Change (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 240 Asian Religions (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 246 Islamic Religious Traditions (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 254 Native American Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 256 Religion in Latin America (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 258 Christian History and Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 262 Philosophy of Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 263 Religion and Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 267 Women and Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 273 The Holocaust: Religious Perspectives (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 300 Classics of Western Religious Thought (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 301 Jewish Spirituality and Mysticism (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 326 Theology (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 350 Selected Study in World Religions (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 355 Selected Study in Religion and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 357 Selected Study in Religious Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 460 Seminar in World Religions (3 hours seminar) 3
            RELG 462 Seminar in Religious Texts (3 hours seminar) 3
            RELG 465 Seminar in Religion and Culture (3 hours seminar) 3
            RELG 467 Seminar in Religious Issues (3 hours seminar) 3
          2. 1 course may be used from:

            GNHU 209 Introduction to Greek and Roman Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
            RELG 209 Introduction to Greek and Roman Religion (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. MYTH STUDIES

        Complete 1 course from the following:

        ENGL 210 Myth and Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
        ENLT 366 African Myth and Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 220 Celtic Mythology (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 288 Mythic Traditions (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 320 Selected Topics in Interdisciplinary Humanities (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 380 The Mythology of JRR Tolkien's Middle-Earth (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 385 Greek Tragedy (3 hours lecture) 3
        GNHU 470 Seminar in Classical Humanities (3 hours seminar) 3
        GNHU 490 Principles of Mythic Symbolism (3 hours lecture) 3
        RELG 332 Myth, Meaning and Self (3 hours lecture) 3
      4. LITERATURE ELECTIVES

        Complete the following 2 requirement(s):

        1. COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

          Complete 3 semester hours from the following:

          1.  

            ENGL 230 Images of Muslim Women in Twentieth Century Literature and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
            ENGL 260 Art of Poetry (3 hours lecture) 3
            ENGL 262 Art of Fiction (3 hours lecture) 3
            ENGL 263 Art of Drama (3 hours lecture) 3
            ENGL 274 Twentieth Century Literature of Immigration (3 hours lecture) 3
            ENGL 360 Irish Literary Revival: 1890-1939 (3 hours lecture) 3
            ENLT 315 American Indian Themes (3 hours lecture) 3
            ENLT 316 African, Asian and Caribbean Literature in English (3 hours lecture) 3
            ENLT 349 Contemporary Irish Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
            ENLT 367 Contemporary African Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
            ENLT 372 Women Prose Writers (3 hours lecture) 3
            ENLT 373 Literary Modernism (3 hours lecture) 3
            ENLT 374 Contemporary European Drama (3 hours lecture) 3
            ENLT 375 Modern Drama: Ibsen to O'Neill (3 hours lecture) 3
            ENLT 376 Modern European Novel (3 hours lecture) 3
            ENLT 377 Speculative Fiction: Fantasy (3 hours lecture) 3
            ENLT 378 Science Fiction (3 hours lecture) 3
            ENLT 398 Autobiography (3 hours lecture) 3
            ENLT 464 Modern Poetry to T.S. Eliot (3 hours lecture) 3
            ENLT 492 Seminar in Comparative Literature (3 hours seminar) 3
            GNHU 217 Reading Asian Cultures (3 hours lecture) 3
            GNHU 290 Selected Topics in Greek and Roman Literature and Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
            GNHU 310 History of Criticism (3 hours lecture) 3
            GNHU 470 Seminar in Classical Humanities (3 hours seminar) 3
          2. 1 course may be used from the following list

            GNHU 293 Russian Culture and Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
            RUIN 293 Russian Culture & Civilization (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. NATIONAL LITERATURE

          Complete 3 semester hours from the following:

          ENGL 234 American Drama (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 238 Black Writers in the United States: A Survey (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 239 Social Protest Literature in America (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 240 English Literature I: Beginnings to 1660 (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 241 English Literature II: 1660 to Present (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 250 Special Topics in English or American Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 256 English Novel to 1900 (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 275 Vietnam War and American Culture (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 294 Women Poets (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 301 The Novels of Toni Morrison (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 324 American Poetry to 1940 (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 325 American Poetry: World War II to Present (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 326 Early American Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 333 Literature of American Renaissance (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 336 American Literary Realism (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 337 Modern American Fiction (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 338 Contemporary American Fiction (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 341 Literature of the Long Eighteenth Century (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 343 Milton (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 344 Chaucer (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 345 Medieval English Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 346 19th Century English Romantic Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 347 Victorian Poetry (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 348 Renaissance Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 352 English Drama: Beginnings to 1642 (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 353 Shakespeare: Comedies-Histories (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 354 Shakespeare: Tragedies-Romances (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 364 Contemporary Poetry (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 401 Old English Language and Literature (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 456 20th Century English Novel (3 hours lecture) 3
          ENGL 493 Seminar in American Literature (3 hours seminar) 3
          ENGL 494 Seminar in English Literature (3 hours seminar) 3
      5. ART AND MUSIC HISTORY ELECTIVE

        Complete 1 course from the following:

        ARHT 101 Art in Non-Western Societies (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 191 African-American Art (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 203 Modern Philosophies of Art (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 280 Asian Art (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 281 African Art: Sub-Saharan (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 290 American Art (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 301 History of the Print (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 302 History of Photography (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 303 History of Industrial Design (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 314 Greek Art (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 315 Roman Art (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 321 Early Medieval Art: Early Christian, Byzantine & Early Medieval (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 322 Medieval Art: Romanesque and Gothic (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 331 Renaissance Art in Italy: The Fifteenth Century (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 332 Renaissance Art in Italy: The Sixteenth Century (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 336 Northern Renaissance Painting (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 340 Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Art (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 350 Art of the Nineteenth Century (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 360 Twentieth-Century Art (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 361 Modern Architecture (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 470 Contemporary Art (3 hours lecture) 3
        ARHT 490 Selected Problems in Art History (3 hour lecture) 3
        MUGN 100 Introduction to Music (3 hours lecture) 3
        MUGN 109 Introduction to Jazz (3 hours lecture) 3
        MUGN 120 Rap and Rock as Cultural Phenomena (2 hours lecture, 1 hour lab) 3
        MUGN 136 The History of Broadway (3 hours lecture) 3
        MUGN 150 Influence of Afro-American Culture on Music (3 hours lecture) 3
        MUGN 160 Introduction to Music in World Cultures (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. TEACHER ED PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS (K-6)

    Complete the following 3 requirement(s):

    1. PRE-PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE

      Complete the following 3 requirements:

      1. PRE-PROFESSIONAL CORE

        Complete for 15 semester hours

        CMST 101 Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture) 3
        EDFD 220 Philosophical Orientation to Education (3 hours lecture) 3
        FCST 214 Child Development I (3 hours lecture) 3
        FCST 314 Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. HEALTH FOR TEACHER EDUCATION

        Complete 1 course from the following, or pass the MSU Health Knowledge Test available through the Center of Pedagogy:

        BIOL 100 Biological Sciences (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 107 Biology for Survival (3 hours lecture) 3
        BIOL 110 The Biology of Human Life (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 215 Human Heredity (3 hours lecture) 3
        BIOL 240 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology I (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        BIOL 241 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology II (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        BIOL 243 Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 380 Genetics (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
        HLTH 101 Personal Health Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 207 Safety, Accidents and Emergency Care. Starting Winter 2016: Injury Prevention and Emergency Care (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 210 Consumer Health (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 213 Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 220 Mental Health (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 290 Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 307 The Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 314 Public Health Aspects of Alcohol Abuse (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 330 Foundations of Health Education. Starting Winter 2016: Health Education Methods (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 411 School Health and Community Services (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 430 Health Counseling. Starting Winter 2016: Counseling Skills for Public Health Professionals (3 hours lecture) 3
        HONP 210 Honors Seminar in Science (3 hours seminar, 2 hours lab) 4
        HONP 211 Honors Seminar in Contemporary Issues in Science (3 hours seminar) 3
        HPEM 150 Principles and Practice of Emergency Care (3 hours lecture) 3
        NUFD 182 Nutrition (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT

        Complete the following 2 courses:

        MTHM 201 Mathematics in Elementary Schools I (3 hours lecture) 3
        MTHM 302 Mathematics in Elementary Schools II (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. ELEMENTARY ED PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE

      Complete for 18 semester hours

      ECEL 200 Perspectives on Early Childhood and Elementary Education in a Democracy (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other) 3
      ECEL 408 Social Studies and the Arts in Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECEL 418 Social and Cultural Context of Families and Communities (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECEL 427 Explorations: Science, Math, and Technology in the Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture) 3
      READ 399 Early Literacy Development and Instruction (3 hours lecture) 3
      READ 408 Literacy in the Elementary Grades (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. CLINICAL SEQUENCE/STUDENT TEACHING

      Complete the following 2 requirements for 15 semester hours:

      1. Complete the following for 7 semester hours:

        1. Complete 3 courses for 5 semester hours:

          ECEL 412 Seminar I: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms (1 hour seminar) 1
          ECEL 421 Seminar II: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms (1 hour seminar) 1
          ECEL 422 Integrating Elementary Curriculum and Assessment for Equity and Diversity (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete for 2 semester hours.

          ECEL 410 Clinical Experience I: Inclusive Elementary and Early Childhood Classrooms 1-3
      2. Complete for 8 semester hours.

        ECEL 414 Clinical Experience II: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms 8

Course Descriptions:

ARHT101: Art in Non-Western Societies (3 hours lecture)

A consideration of the role of art in traditional non-western societies. Includes an examination of the integration of art into the society as a whole-the religions, economics, environment, and social order. The role art plays in social change and how it is affected by social change. Meets the Gen Ed 2002- Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Fulfills the Special Topics requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 220 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ARHT191: African-American Art (3 hours lecture)

Afro-American art in the United States from colonial times to the present. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

ARHT203: Modern Philosophies of Art (3 hours lecture)

The work of major writers about art from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to the present day; the nature of the creative experience and process, the function of art in the life of the individual and of society, the rise of new materials and institutions; the development of sentiments and attitudes affecting thinking in the field. Fulfills the Twentieth Century requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 250 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHT280: Asian Art (3 hours lecture)

The arts and material culture of China, Korea, Japan, India, and Southeast Asia. How Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam commerce and migration shaped traditional Asian arts and societies. Specific focus defined by the professor. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits by permission of department. Fulfills the Special Topics requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 327 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHT281: African Art: Sub-Saharan (3 hours lecture)

The art and material cultures of Africa from prehistoric remains to contemporary art: stylistic groupings; relation to ceremony and to daily life; symbolism; and relations to the arts of other cultures. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Fulfills the Special Topics requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 458 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ARHT290: American Art (3 hours lecture)

Art in the United States from the colonial period through the nineteenth century; the development of an American style in the light of its relationship to and dependence upon European art. Previous course ARHS 329 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARHT 105, ARHT 106, ARHT 190, ARHT 191, ENWR 105, HONP 100, or departmental approval.

ARHT301: History of the Print (3 hours lecture)

The principal types of prints in Western and non-western cultures, from their beginnings to the present day. Fulfills the Special Topics requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 230 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT302: History of Photography (3 hours lecture)

The roots of photography, its practitioners and the social and historical circumstances surrounding its creation. Fulfills the Special Topics requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 477 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT303: History of Industrial Design (3 hours lecture)

The history of Industrial Design is traced from the industrial revolution to the present day. Fulfills the Special Topics requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 370 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT314: Greek Art (3 hours lecture)

Greek art and material culture including painting, sculpture and architecture from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period. Fulfills the Ancient art requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 328 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT315: Roman Art (3 hours lecture)

The arts and material culture of the Etruscans and Romans in their historical, cultural and religious settings. Fulfills the Ancient art requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 485 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT321: Early Medieval Art: Early Christian, Byzantine & Early Medieval (3 hours lecture)

The emergence and development of early Christian, Jewish, Byzantine, and Islamic art from Late Antiquity through Iconoclasm and the early Middle Ages. Fulfills the Medieval requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 322 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT322: Medieval Art: Romanesque and Gothic (3 hours lecture)

The art and material culture of the High Middle Ages: how religious reform, crusade, and pilgrimage shaped the arts of Europe and Byzantium; Christian, Jewish, and Islamic art. Fulfills the Medieval requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 323 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT331: Renaissance Art in Italy: The Fifteenth Century (3 hours lecture)

Renaissance painting, sculpture and architecture during the Quattrocento; Masaccio, Mantegna, Donatello, Brunelleschi, and Alberti emphasized. Fulfills the Renaissance requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 216 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT332: Renaissance Art in Italy: The Sixteenth Century (3 hours lecture)

The great masters of the Cinquecento: Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, Giorgione and Titan; the emergence of Mannerist art and architecture in Rome, Venice, Florence and Bologna. Fulfills the Renaissance requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 452 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201 or GNED 202 or HONP 201 or HONP 202 or ARDW 200 or ARDW 201 or ARPH 200 or MUGN 241 or RELG 221 or ENFL 208 or ARHT 200 or ARHT 202 or ARHT 203 or ARHT 280 or ARHT 281 or ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT336: Northern Renaissance Painting (3 hours lecture)

Fifteenth and sixteenth century painting in northern Europe with particular attention to Flanders and Holland; emphasis on Jan Van Eyck, Van Der Weyden, Bosch, Peter Bruegel and Matthias Gruenewald. Fulfills the Medieval requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 324 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT340: Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Art (3 hours lecture)

The art and material culture of Western Europe from 1600 to 1800; Baroque and Rococo styles with emphasis on El Greco, Bernini, Rubens, Rembrandt, Poussin and Watteau. Fulfills the Baroque requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 325 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT350: Art of the Nineteenth Century (3 hours lecture)

The major movements in nineteenth-century art: Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, as seen in painting, sculpture, prints, and objects of material culture. Relationship of the art to political, social, cultural, and economic factors during this period. Fulfills the Nineteenth-century art requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 459 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT360: Twentieth-Century Art (3 hours lecture)

From Picasso to the end of the Twentieth-century: Cubism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art and Minimalism; scientific and social forces transforming the artist's vision, including the theories of Freud and Bergson. Fulfills the Twentieth century requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 469 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT361: Modern Architecture (3 hours lecture)

Major contributions to the development of modern architecture in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; the development of styles, structural innovations and theories of design. Fulfills the Twentieth Century/Contemporary requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 450 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 201, GNED 202, HONP 201, HONP 202, ARDW 200, ARDW 201, ARPH 200, MUGN 241, RELG 221, ENFL 208, ARHT 200, ARHT 202, ARHT 203, ARHT 280, ARHT 281, ARHT 290 or departmental approval.

ARHT470: Contemporary Art (3 hours lecture)

The work of major artists of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries with particular reference to the dominant ideas and visual culture of the period; readings, museum trips, discussion of contemporary writing and criticism. Fulfills the Twentieth century/Contemporary requirement for majors. Previous course ARHS 451 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARHT 350 and ARHT 360.

ARHT490: Selected Problems in Art History (3 hour lecture)

A seminar in topics such as the works of an individual artist or a particular theme in art history (e.g. the human figure) or a particular technique (e.g. sculpture); lectures, reports, museum and studio visits, discussion. May be repeated seven times for a maximum of 24.0 credits. Previous course ARHS 455 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ARHT 105, ARHT 106, ARHT 350 and ARHT 360.

BIOL100: Biological Sciences (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The study of life from molecule to organism with focus on structure and function of cells, mechanisms of heredity and change, survey of animals and plants and their interrelationships in the living world. Open to non-majors as well as majors. BIOL 100 is not included in the GPA as a biology major course. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

BIOL107: Biology for Survival (3 hours lecture)

Basic concepts of biology that focus on social implications of pollution, population control, radiation, drugs, pesticides, the genetic revolution, etc. For non-science majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

BIOL110: The Biology of Human Life (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The course is intended to serve the non-biology major and present a basic introduction to human anatomy and physiology. It will provide students with a laboratory experience so that they may learn the scientific method and its application in the field of human biology. This course will provide these students with a body of knowledge specific to human anatomy and physiology so that they may be well informed when dealing with important personal, family and societal issues relative to health and life-style decisions. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

BIOL215: Human Heredity (3 hours lecture)

A non-major course introducing concepts of classical heredity and modern molecular genetics, which stresses the techniques and significance of genetic knowledge and research. 3 sh.

BIOL240: Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology I (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Human anatomy and physiology for health education and physical education majors. Not for biology majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

BIOL241: Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology II (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Human anatomy and physiology for health education and physical education majors. Not for biology majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 240.

BIOL243: Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

A study of the dynamics of the human body in relation to its structure and function is based on its nutritional input. Each organ system is discussed in relation to its contribution to the whole functioning organism, as well as a basic survey of its pathologies. Primarily for ADA certification. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 130.

BIOL380: Genetics (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Lecture and lab. Heredity, gene and chromosomal structure and function, gene regulation, mutation and repair, genes in populations, genetic manipulation, and applied genetics are covered. Lab exercises demonstrate genetic concepts. A semester-long project with research paper is required. Required of all biology majors and minors. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Biology, Molecular Biology and Science Informatics. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 230 with a grade of C- or higher and CHEM 120 with a grade of C- or higher.

CMST101: Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical requirements of different types of public presentations and helps students develop an understanding and appreciation of the dynamic nature of the communication process. The course focuses on the basic elements of the communication process, listening, communicator and audience characteristics, basic research skills, and message composition and delivery. Students learn about the demands of public presentations in culturally and professionally diverse environments and develop presentation competence and flexibility. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Communication, Communication. Previous course SPCM 101 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

ECEL200: Perspectives on Early Childhood and Elementary Education in a Democracy (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other)

This course examines the education of children during their early and elementary school years from historical, political, social, and cultural perspectives. Students critically analyze issues influencing our current public education system to determine their impact on schools, teachers, children families, and society. They examine how our education systems reflect and respond to the changing needs, knowledge, and dispositions of our democratic society. Closed to Freshmen. 25 hours of field experience required. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 or equivalent writing course from an accredited college/university. Not open to freshmen.

ECEL408: Social Studies and the Arts in Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture)

In this course, students consider the knowledge, skills, and perspectives necessary to help learners become active and informed citizens able to think critically about local, national, and global contexts in the 21st Century. Students are introduced to the four strands that frame social studies in New Jersey-(A) Civics, Government, and Human Rights; (B) Geography, People, and the Environment; (C) Economics, Innovation, and Technology; and (D) History, Culture, and Perspectives. Independently and in groups, students enter real and virtual spaces to plan, implement, and evaluate teaching and learning that draws upon technology. Students experiment with technology and the arts-dance, theater, music, and the visual arts-in their discovery of methods that position learners to understand the myths and truths of the past and present with the capacity to imagine future realities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

ECEL410: Clinical Experience I: Inclusive Elementary and Early Childhood Classrooms

This course introduces students to the dynamics of inclusive elementary and early childhood classrooms, schools, and communities. Through required fieldwork in elementary and early childhood settings, observations, interviews, and data collection, students discuss the role of the teacher(s), documentation and assessment techniques, variables of the classroom environment, school climate, and the wider community. Students implement lesson plans and use a range of observation and documentation strategies including running records, environmental rating scales, anecdotal records, checklists, rating scales, and examination of children's work. Students learn to link community resources to school and classroom needs, collect data to inform instructional practice and culturally responsive teaching and learning, and evaluate the progress and needs of children in inclusive elementary and early childhood settings. Fieldwork is required. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200 and READ 399.

ECEL412: Seminar I: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms (1 hour seminar)

Accompanies ECEL 410, Clinical Experience I: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms, and offers students a forum for discussion, reflection, and critical thinking with regard to clinical work in inclusive elementary classrooms. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200.

ECEL414: Clinical Experience II: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms

Students demonstrate their knowledge of child and early adolescent development and the significant role of families and communities with regard to children's learning by planning and implementing developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive curriculum in an inclusive elementary classroom. Focusing on the diverse needs of individual children, students develop, implement, and assess an integrated curriculum unit that incorporates the Core Curriculum Content Standards and emphasizes literacy across the curriculum. As reflective practitioners, students utilize multiple strategies to assess children's learning, classroom climate, and effective classroom management. Students are responsible for the full range of teacher activities in the classroom and are expected to seek out parents, administrators, and school colleagues as resources. Students are required to assemble an exhibition portfolio and participate in a mock interview in order to demonstrate their strengths as a teacher. 8 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 410.

ECEL418: Social and Cultural Context of Families and Communities (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with an understanding of how social, cultural, economic, and environmental influences shape children's development and learning. Students explore the relationships and role expectations among teacher, family, child, and community as they affect learning. They also examine methods for developing school/family partnerships and how to use community resources to support families. Students learn to take into account issues of child diversity as they create learning experiences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing.

ECEL421: Seminar II: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms (1 hour seminar)

Provides students with a forum to discuss the role of the teacher as teacher candidates take on full-time classroom responsibilities. Discussions focus on identifying and involving oneself in the professional field of elementary and middle school education, upholding and advocating for ethical standards, engaging in continuous and collaborative learning, and taking a critical stance to inform practice. Teacher candidates demonstrate that they can make and justify decisions based on their knowledge of central issues such as developmentally appropriate practice, culturally responsive learning and teaching, and the context of children's lives. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 412 or ECEL 413.

ECEL422: Integrating Elementary Curriculum and Assessment for Equity and Diversity (3 hours lecture)

In this course, students engage in reflective curriculum planning. They develop an integrated unit that incorporates state standards, differentiated instructional strategies, and appropriate adaptations for students with diverse learning styles and interests, students with disabilities, and English Language Learners. Students investigate and discuss issues related to their teaching and learning experiences focusing on inclusion practices, assessment, classroom management, and culturally responsive teaching. Students critically reflect on their teaching beliefs and explore teacher professionalism in the field of elementary education. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

ECEL427: Explorations: Science, Math, and Technology in the Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture)

Explores the nature of elementary science and math instruction, how to incorporate these disciplines in inclusive upper elementary/middle school classrooms . Hands-on/minds-on science and math activities and effective management techniques that engage children in the wonder and critical study of life, earth, physical (human-made), and space sciences will be examined. Stategies to adapt science and math learning to individual learners will be emphasized. Students will gain confidence and skills in the unifying concepts of science: systems, order, and organization; evidence, models and explanation; change, constancy, and measurement; evolution and equilibrium; and form and function. Mathematical concepts such as geometric thinking and spatial sense, chance and data analysis, number systems and number sense, patterns and algebraic thinking, and problem solving will also be explored. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200 and admission to Teacher Education Program.

EDFD220: Philosophical Orientation to Education (3 hours lecture)

Western philosophical heritage as related to the issues and responsibilities of American education. Comparative analysis of past and current ideological movements that influence moral, social, and educational decisions of parents, political leaders, and professional educators. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

ENGL210: Myth and Literature (3 hours lecture)

Myth and the myth-making process: the origins, meanings and major archetypes and motifs of Occidental and Oriental myths. Previous course ENLT 260 effective through Winter 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL230: Images of Muslim Women in Twentieth Century Literature and Culture (3 hours lecture)

Through an exploration of writings by and about Muslim women in various parts of the world, students will be encouraged to develop an appreciation of the variety of aesthetic forms and narrative structures embodied therein. Representation in other cultural forms such as film will also be looked at to challenge monolithic assumptions. Previous course ENLT 230 effective through Winter 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL234: American Drama (3 hours lecture)

American drama chosen for excellence or representative of a significant era or movement in the theatre from the early 18th century imitative works through melodrama to the serious works of the 20th century. Centered on major American playwrights and their work. The course also examines the backgrounds of our modern stage, including readings in minor/historical works. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL238: Black Writers in the United States: A Survey (3 hours lecture)

Black writers in the United States from Colonial times to the present. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL239: Social Protest Literature in America (3 hours lecture)

Novels, dramas and poetry of protest against social injustices in the United States since World War I. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL240: English Literature I: Beginnings to 1660 (3 hours lecture)

English literature from its beginnings to 1660 examined through representative works of major and minor authors. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL241: English Literature II: 1660 to Present (3 hours lecture)

English literature from the Restoration to the present. May be taken independently of English Literature I. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL250: Special Topics in English or American Literature (3 hours lecture)

A survey or genre course on a topic not included in the regular departmental offerings. May be used by English majors as a departmental elective. May be repeated without limit as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL256: English Novel to 1900 (3 hours lecture)

Form and theme of the English novel through the 18th and 19th centuries, evaluated by literary, social, moral and cultural criteria. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL260: Art of Poetry (3 hours lecture)

An introductory course in reading, interpreting, and evaluating poetry. Attention is paid to style, form, and poetic convention. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL262: Art of Fiction (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to form and techniques in fiction through close reading and discussion of representative texts. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL263: Art of Drama (3 hours lecture)

This course explores the major forms, features, eras, and writers of world drama from ancient times to the present. Selections of plays explore ways in which cultural issues are performed. By examining a wide variety of such performances in their historical and political contexts, students will gain a broad appreciation for theater and a deep understanding of the many ways in which it expresses the tragedy and comedy of the human condition. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL274: Twentieth Century Literature of Immigration (3 hours lecture)

The Literature of Immigration examines the experience of immigrants to the United States through the fiction, poetry and drama of writers of varying cultural backgrounds to learn about the customs, religions, mores and assimilative strategies of old and new immigrant groups. Literary strategies used by the writers will be emphasized. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Previous course ENLT 274 effective through Winter 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL275: Vietnam War and American Culture (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the problem of the legacy of the experience of the Vietnam War (sometimes called the "Vietnam Syndrome") as it is reflected in the culture of the United States and primarily in American literature since the end of the war in 1975. Differing discussions and evaluations of the problems bequeathed by the Vietnam War will be examined in works of political commentary, cultural criticism, history, and foreign affairs, as well as in literature. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL294: Women Poets (3 hours lecture)

Selected poets from Sappho through Emily Dickinson to Sylvia Plath examined in relation to contemporary women poets. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL301: The Novels of Toni Morrison (3 hours lecture)

This course focuses on the fiction of Toni Morrison. Readings will include her published novels (from 1970 to the present), as well as selections from her critical writings. Such matters as the nature of her prose style, developments of her literary reputation, and place within the literary canon will be studied. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL324: American Poetry to 1940 (3 hours lecture)

American poetry from Poe to Langston Hughes with an emphasis on what makes the American voice unique. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL325: American Poetry: World War II to Present (3 hours lecture)

American poetry beginning with William Carlo Williams and continuing to the present with an emphasis on new attitudes, techniques and contributions to American culture. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL326: Early American Literature (3 hours lecture)

American literature from the Puritans to 1800, tracing the development of colonial and revolutionary thought and the beginning of America's cultural independence. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL333: Literature of American Renaissance (3 hours lecture)

An analysis of American literary texts between 1820 and 1865. Covers American Romantics like Hawthorne, Melville, and Poe and transcendentalists like Margaret Fuller, Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman. Special attention given to political writings (e.g., Lydia Maria Child, Frederick Douglass) and to women writers (including Fanny Fern, Stowe, and Louisa May Alcott). Previous course ENGL 226 effective through Summer 2011. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 220 or ENGL 206 or ENGL 207 or ENGL 210 or ENJR 219 or ENGL 230 or ENGL 234 or ENGL 235 or ENGL 237 or ENGL 238 or ENGL 239 or ENGL 240 or ENGL 241 or ENGL 250 or ENGL 252 or ENGL 254 or ENGL 256 or ENGL 260 or ENGL 262 or ENGL 263 or ENGL 274or ENGL 275 or ENGL 294 or ENGL 300 or ENGL 341 or ENGL 342.

ENGL336: American Literary Realism (3 hours lecture)

The works of James, Howells, Twain, Crane, Norris, Dreiser and others are examined in light of the developing literary concepts of realism, naturalism and social Darwinism in the changing cultural period between 1860 and 1900. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL337: Modern American Fiction (3 hours lecture)

American fiction from 1918 to 1945 with attention to the works, criticism and lives of such authors as Hemingway, Faulkner and Fitzgerald. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL338: Contemporary American Fiction (3 hours lecture)

Developments in American fiction since the 1940's with attention to such authors as Mailer, Roth, Nabokov and Vonnegut. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL341: Literature of the Long Eighteenth Century (3 hours lecture)

Important works of literature from the long eighteenth century (ca. 1660-1780), including poetry, criticism, fiction, and drama, examined within the literary, cultural, social, and intellectual contexts of the Restoration era through the period of Enlightenment. Authors may include Behn, Burney, Cavendish, Defoe, Dryden, Fielding, Gay, Goldsmith, Haywood, Johnson, Montagu, Pope, Richardson, Sterne, Swift, and others. Previous course ENGL 247 effective through Winter 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 220 or ENGL 206 or ENGL 207 or ENGL 210 or ENGL 230 or ENGL 234 or ENGL 237 or ENGL 238 or ENGL 240 or ENGL 241 or ENGL 250 or ENGL 252 or ENGL 256 or ENGL 260 or ENGL 262 or ENGL 263 or ENGL 274 or ENGL 280 or ENGL 294 or ENFL 208.

ENGL343: Milton (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the mind and art of Milton. Intensive study of one major work and selections representative of the full range of his achievement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL344: Chaucer (3 hours lecture)

Troilus and Criseyde, The Canterbury Tales and some of the minor poems in Middle English. No previous language training required. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL345: Medieval English Literature (3 hours lecture)

The literature of England in the English Language from ca. 700 A.D. to A.D., in its historical and social contexts, and in relation to continental literature. Where appropriate, works are read in Middle English. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 220 or ENGL 206 or ENGL 207 or ENGL 210 or ENGL 230 or ENGL 234 or ENGL 235 or ENGL 237 or ENGL 238 or ENGL 239 or ENGL 240 or ENGL 241 or ENGL 250 or ENGL 252 or ENGL 256 or ENGL 260 or ENGL 262 or ENGL 263 or ENGL 274 or ENGL 275 or ENGL 278 or ENGL 280 or ENGL 284 or ENGL 294 or ENGL 341 or ENGL 342 or ENGL 352 or ENGL 219 or JAST 219 may be taken as prerequisites or corequisites.

ENGL346: 19th Century English Romantic Literature (3 hours lecture)

The revolutionary expression of such poets and essayists as Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Byron, Keats, Hazlitt, De Quincey and Lamb. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL347: Victorian Poetry (3 hours lecture)

Major British poets from the Victorian period (1837-1901), including Alfred Lord Tennyson, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, Christina Rossetti, and Gerard Manley Hopkins. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENFL 208 or ENWR 220 or ENGL 206 or ENGL 207 or ENGL 234 or ENGL 237 or ENGL 238 or ENGL 240 or ENGL 241 or ENGL 250 or ENGL 252 or ENGL 256 or ENGL 260 or ENGL 262 or ENGL 263 or ENGL 270 or ENGL 274 or ENGL 278 or ENGL 280.

ENGL348: Renaissance Literature (3 hours lecture)

Major poets and prose writers of 16th and early 17th century England such as Sydney, Lyly, Nashe, Greene, Donne and Browne, whose individual contributions in poetry and prose reflect the literary and philosophical preoccupations of the period. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL352: English Drama: Beginnings to 1642 (3 hours lecture)

English drama from its Medieval origins to the closing of the theaters in 1642; from miracles, mysteries and moralities through the development of Tudor and Stuart drama. Shakespeare excluded. Previous course ENGL 254 effective through Winter 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENGL 263 or ENWR 220.

ENGL353: Shakespeare: Comedies-Histories (3 hours lecture)

Representative comedies and histories: their sources, devices and characteristics; their staging in the context of Elizabethan society; and Shakespeare's vision of man as actor. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL354: Shakespeare: Tragedies-Romances (3 hours lecture)

Representative tragedies and romances: their sources, devices and characteristics; their staging in the context of Elizabethan society; and Shakespeare's view of man in the tragic mode and in the later romances. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL360: Irish Literary Revival: 1890-1939 (3 hours lecture)

Irish fiction, drama, poetry, and prose during a period of energetic cultural nationalism from the 1890's through the Irish War of Independence and into the 1930's. Particular attention will be paid to the works of Joyce, Shaw, Yeats, Synge, Gregory and others. Previous course ENLT 348 effective through Winter 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 220 or ENGL 240 or ENGL 241 or ENGL 245 or ENGL 247 or ENGL 248 or ENGL 256 or ENGL 260 or ENGL 262 or ENGL 263.

ENGL364: Contemporary Poetry (3 hours lecture)

Distinctive movements in poetry since the imagists, comparing the diverse styles, themes and poetic theories of representative poets of English-speaking countries. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL401: Old English Language and Literature (3 hours lecture)

Selected prose and poetry representative of the heroic, elegiac, religious and popular traditions of pre-conquest England, with recitation and reading in the original old English. No previous language training required. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL456: 20th Century English Novel (3 hours lecture)

The literary and cultural context and the stylistic and structural changes in representative British novels of the 20th century. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENGL493: Seminar in American Literature (3 hours seminar)

The works of one major American author in depth or of a group of authors whose works are related by theme, artistic form or cultural period. Enrollment limited. May be repeated without limit as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101; junior or senior English major.

ENGL494: Seminar in English Literature (3 hours seminar)

The works of one major English author in depth or of a group of English authors whose works are related by theme, artistic form or cultural period. Enrollment limited. May be repeated without limit as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101; junior or senior English major.

ENLT315: American Indian Themes (3 hours lecture)

"American Indian Themes" will be organized around the following topics: attitudes toward the land and animals; relationship to the divine and its manifestations, gods and goddesses; culture, specifically understood as arts and rituals; gender identities and family structures; political realities of a conquered people; contemporary status of American-Indians and their lives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENLT316: African, Asian and Caribbean Literature in English (3 hours lecture)

"African, Asian, and Caribbean Literature in English" will include four genres: prose, poetry, drama, and performance pieces. Significant connections will be drawn among the varieties of English and the thematic and critical issues being raised by experts who are studying these literatures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENLT349: Contemporary Irish Literature (3 hours lecture)

A study of contemporary Irish writers reflecting cultural, social, political, economic and class changes since the Irish Revival period. Writers include Seamus Heaney, Roddy Doyle, Eavan Boland, and Brian Friel. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENLT366: African Myth and Literature (3 hours lecture)

The nature of the sub-Saharan experience and vision through African myths and literary works within the context of culture, criticism and theory. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENLT367: Contemporary African Literature (3 hours lecture)

A comparative study of the literatures of African writers from countries with a history of British colonialism dating from the 1960's to the present. Topics will include: forms of storytelling and narrative representation; contemporary issues and themes in postcolonial texts; political and aesthetic frameworks; and dissemination of African literatures in a global market. ENLT 206 or 207 recommended. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENLT372: Women Prose Writers (3 hours lecture)

Readings in the international fiction and non-fiction of women writers. The focus will be on such themes as the nature of the family, changing relationships between women and men, evolving concepts of the "feminine," the impact of colonialism on gender related issues (i.e. work and women's identity) and interrelationships between religion and women's lives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENLT373: Literary Modernism (3 hours lecture)

The intellectual concepts of Futurism, Dada, Surrealism and Expressionism in the early 20th century, which continue to influence literature and art. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENLT374: Contemporary European Drama (3 hours lecture)

Plays representing the themes, values and dramatic techniques of selected British and continental (French, German, Italian, Russian and/or other) dramatists. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENLT375: Modern Drama: Ibsen to O'Neill (3 hours lecture)

Major modern plays and the playwrights whose critical insights and historical perspectives led to their unique contributions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENLT376: Modern European Novel (3 hours lecture)

The creative expression of such novelists as Gide, Hesse, Kafka, Proust and Woolf as shaped by events of the period 1910 to 1930, and how these works influenced the future of the novel. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENLT377: Speculative Fiction: Fantasy (3 hours lecture)

The impossible and improbable in fairy tales, myth, legend, horror, sword and sorcery, the supernatural and high fantasy as a critical mode. Technological science fiction excluded. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENLT378: Science Fiction (3 hours lecture)

Fiction of the future that speculates and extrapolates from the physical and social sciences, selected from both the classics and contemporary writings. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENLT398: Autobiography (3 hours lecture)

Autobiographical readings, especially in letters, diaries, and journals, from ancient times to the present. Emphasis on the aesthetics of autobiography, autobiography as the mirror of an age, and autobiography as a model of the examined life. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENLT464: Modern Poetry to T.S. Eliot (3 hours lecture)

Works of the French symbolists and the Georgian and imagist poets of Britain, the continent and America whose theories and principles underlie modern poetics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101.

ENLT492: Seminar in Comparative Literature (3 hours seminar)

A culture, era, theme or literary approach studied through international literary masterpieces. Enrollment limited. May be repeated without limit as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101; junior or senior English major.

FCST214: Child Development I (3 hours lecture)

This course takes a developmental approach to the study of young children from conception to age 10. For each developmental stage, students explore physical, socio-emotional, cognitive, and language domains. Developmental theories are woven into each part of the course and an emphasis is placed upon observational and research methodologies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

FCST314: Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture)

In this course students utilize a developmental approach to study adolescents (11-18 years) focusing on physical, cognitive and social development throughout this age period. Students examine the impact of family, peers, race, ethnicity, socio-cultural, and environmental influences on adolescents. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 214 and PSYC 101. Out-of-class interviews and/or observations are required.

GNHU201: General Humanities I (to 1400) (3 hours lecture)

A broadly historical introduction to important themes and topics in the humanities as seen through literature, philosophy, and the arts from the ancient world to the Middle Ages. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, World Literature or General Humanities. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in General Humanities. 3 sh.

GNHU202: General Humanities II (from 1400) (3 hours lecture)

A broadly historical introduction to important themes and topics in the humanities as seen through literature, philosophy, and the arts from Renaissance to the present. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, World Literature or General Humanities. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in General Humanities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201; or ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

GNHU209: Introduction to Greek and Roman Religion (3 hours lecture)

A survey of religious thought and practices as they applied to individual, family and society among the Greeks and Romans, and how these items contributed to the religious life of the modern Western world. Cross listed with RELG 209. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

GNHU217: Reading Asian Cultures (3 hours lecture)

This course is an introduction to a wide range of cultural traditions across Asia as seen through a spectrum of cultural objects. Particular emphasis will be given to the cultural accomplishments of China, Japan, and India, and these will be read in their cultural and historical contexts. Students can expect to read poetry, drama, and prose, view a variety of art forms, and listen to musical styles from ancient, medieval, and modern periods. Students will learn to appreciate and analyze complex cultural objects as well as the traditions behind them. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 115 or GNHU 151; or ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

GNHU220: Celtic Mythology (3 hours lecture)

This course is an in-depth survey of the mythology and legends of the ancient and medieval Celtic peoples of the British Isles, and their influence on later literature, religion, and culture. Particular emphasis is placed on Irish myth and hagiography and their reinterpretation in nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature, film, music, and popular culture. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or ENWR 106 or GNHU 115 or GNHU 151 or GNHU 201 or GNHU 202 or HONP 100 or HONP 101.

GNHU281: Greek Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Greek world from the Bronze Age to the Roman conquest as seen through literary, documentary and archaeological sources. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Classics. Cross listed with History, HIST 281. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Not for History Majors/Minors. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 115 or GNHU 151; or ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

GNHU282: Roman Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Roman world from the Regal period to Justinian as seen through literary, documentary, and archaeological sources. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. Cross listed with History, HIST 282. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Not for History Majors/Minors. Starting Winter 2016: Not for History Majors/Minors. GNHU 115 or GNHU 151; or ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

GNHU283: Women, Gender, and Sexuality in the Ancient World (3 hours lecture)

This course uses women, gender, and sexuality to model a broad, cross-disciplinary, and issue-oriented approach to ancient societies. Students will examine cultural and historical objects, such as historical and philosophical works, inscriptions, and graffiti. They will view monuments and artifacts. They will learn how to approach complex cultural objects and understand how social constructions of gender affected and reflected the lives of women and men in ancient Greece, Rome, and the Near East. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 115 or GNHU 151 or ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

GNHU285: Mythology (3 hours lecture)

The nature and interpretation of mythology, primarily as seen through the myths of Greece and Rome. Selected comparative study of myths of the Near East, Iran, India and other cultures. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, World Literature or General Humanities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 115 or GNHU 151; or ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

GNHU288: Mythic Traditions (3 hours lecture)

A survey of Greco-Roman myths and their recurrence in and influence on later literature, art, music, and film, and how they contribute to the ongoing development of culture. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 115 or GNHU 151 or ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

GNHU290: Selected Topics in Greek and Roman Literature and Culture (3 hours lecture)

This course will examine topics that involve the interrelationships between the literature and the culture of Greece and Rome, including that of the Roman Empire broadly understood. It will focus on how literary texts arise from, interact with, explain and critique their cultures and the productions of those cultures, such as art, architecture, rhetoric, sports, politics. This course may be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 115 or GNHU 151 or ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

GNHU293: Russian Culture and Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The history of Russian culture from the early stages of Slavic civilization to the contemporary post-Soviet Russian Federation. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the arts, especially literature, as a reflection of philosophical, political, and cultural change. No knowledge of Russian is required. Cross listed with Modern Languages and Literatures, RUIN 293. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets General Education Requirement (GER) - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 115 or GNHU 151 or ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

GNHU310: History of Criticism (3 hours lecture)

This course provides introduction to the major figures in literary criticism, proceeding historically from classical to modern times. Particular emphasis is given to Classical Greek and Latin criticism as the foundational texts for all later criticism of any of the arts, and of those who interpreted and elaborated these classical works in the Renaissance and Neo-classical periods, as well as on the innovations of the Romantics and of the modern period. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 202 or GNHU 285.

GNHU320: Selected Topics in Interdisciplinary Humanities (3 hours lecture)

This course examines a topic or issue utilizing the content and approaches of two or more fields of Humanitites (broadly defined, including Art History, Theater, Dance and the Fine Arts) to consider some particular issue or topic relevant to the Humanities. May be repeated twice for a total of up to 9 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201 or GNHU 202 or GNHU 285.

GNHU332: Selected Topics in Ancient History (Greece, Rome, W. Asia, N. Africa, Europe) (3 hours lecture)

Courses offered under this selected topics rubric examine specific periods and issues concerning Mediterranean, Western Asian, and European political, cultural, social and economic history from the Bronze Age to the late Antique. May be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 OR HIST/GNHU 281 or HIST/GNHU 282.

GNHU345: Imaging Medieval and Early Modern Women (3 hours lecture)

This course explores representations of medieval and early modern women, gender, and sexuality in literary, artistic, and musical media that were produced in continental Europe. Paying particular attention to works - e.g., manuscript illuminations, songs, texts - produced by, for, and about women this course transcends disciplinary boundaries and draws on a range of methodological approaches. 3 hours lecture. Cross-listed with WMGS 345. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or WMGS 201; or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201 or GNHU 202 or WMGS 201.

GNHU351: The City in Antiquity (3 hours lecture)

Cities and city-based culture in the Greek and Roman world seen through the evidence of archaeology, literary sources, and contemporary documents such as inscriptions. Town planning, economic life, social groups, and population patterns in selected ancient cities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or GNHU 201 or HONP 101 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or GNHU 283 or GNHU 285 or HIST 281 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU355: Alexander the Great: Legend and Legacy (3 hours lecture)

Dying undefeated at the age of 32, Alexander the Great (356-323 BC) had conquered the vast Persian Empire stretching from the Mediterranean sea to the borders of present-day Pakistan, ensuring the spread of Greek culture throughout the known world. This course studies Alexander's life, accomplishments, and geo-historical impact, as well as his transformation into a quasi-mythical figure in literature and art throughout the east and west from antiquity to today. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU357: The Roman Republic (3 hours lecture)

From a small town barely dominant over one region of Italy, Rome grew, between the traditional founding of the Republic in 509 and the collapse of the Republican government in the mid-first century BCE, to be a wealthy and sophisticated center of culture and a Mediterranean "world" power backed by a major military machine and accustomed to frequent victory in war. This course examines that process, with special emphasis on the role of the Senate in motivating foreign policy, the role of patronage and self-advertisement, and the massive influx of new cultural characteristics, from large-scale slavery to the creation of a literature and a taste for things Greek that took place during the last two centuries BCE. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU358: Cleopatra (3 hours lecture)

This course examines Cleopatra VII both as she appears in the historical record and as later authors and artists have shaped her image. Issues considered include female power, east vs. west, and politics and propaganda. Beyond Cleopatra herself, the course considers the Hellenistic period, the origins of the Roman Empire, the cosmopolitan city of Alexandria, and women's roles in ancient society. In addition, the course offers an introduction to the study of reception, the recreation and re-interpretation of history, art, and literature in subsequent ages. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU360: The Roman Empire (3 hours lecture)

Among empires ancient and modern, that of the Romans is especially noteworthy for its geographical extent, cultural richness and diversity, duration, and status as a model or anti-model for more recent polities. This course centers around the three and a half centuries from the establishment by Augustus of the regime known as the Principate to the period of Diocletian and Constantine in the fourth century CE, when changing conditions and new political forces began to alter its nature significantly. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing primary sources of information and on understanding the development of Rome from an outside power ruling a diverse collection of regions to an entity incorporating increasingly shared ideologies and other cultural habits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU361: Selected Topics in Mediterranean Archaeology (3 hours lecture)

The course consists of in-depth study of the archaeological evidence for a selected period, region, or other thematic topic within the ancient Mediterranean world broadly defined. Special attention will be given to the role which archaeology plays in reconstructing the history of past cultures and to the Mediterranean archaeologist's frequent need to reconcile ancient written evidence with archaeologically obtained data. May be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201, GNHU 281, HIST 281, GNHU 282, HIST 282, GNHU 285 or GNHU 181. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or HIST 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 282 or GNHU 285.

GNHU362: Field Methods in Mediterranean Archaeology

This course is a practical introduction to how archaeology is conducted in the field at an ancient site in the Mediterranean world. Students learn basic techniques of surveying, digging, artifact removal and processing, and on-site record keeping as well as the overall organization of an archaeological project in the field. The course is given on-site at an appropriate excavation location. 3 - 6 sh.

Prerequisites: One of the following: A previous course in some aspect of Mediterranean archaeology; previous archaeological fieldwork experience; or permission of the instructor.

GNHU380: The Mythology of JRR Tolkien's Middle-Earth (3 hours lecture)

The course is an in-depth survey of the major fictional works of JRR Tolkien, The Silmarillion, The Hobbit, and The Lord of the Rings, as created but coherent and comparable mythology. Particular emphasis is placed on the close reading of these texts, but their sources in traditional mythologies, and their extensive representation and influence in film, music, and art, will also be studied. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or GNHU 202 or GNHU 285 or departmental approval.

GNHU381: Africa in Classical Antiquity (3 hours lecture)

The importance of Africa in the Greco-Roman world: economic, intellectual, political, and artistic contributions; Blacks and ancient institutions: army, theater, sport, government, slavery; ancient attitudes toward race; famous Africans of antiquity. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or HIST 281 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or departmental approval.

GNHU384: Introduction to Roman Law (3 hours lecture)

The role of law in Roman history and society. Social structure and family law. The law and slavery. Property, contracts, and delicts. Legal forms, legal fictions, and the response of law to new conditions. Roman law in the Medieval and Modern periods. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 201 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or HIST 281 or HIST 282 or JURI 210 or LAWS 200.

GNHU385: Greek Tragedy (3 hours lecture)

Selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides read in English translation; origins of Greek drama, religion and myth in tragedy, the tragic hero, stage production, influence on modern literature. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 285 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 281 or GNHU 285 or HIST 281.

GNHU454: Lucretius and Ancient Science (3 hours lecture)

Reading of De Rerum Natura with study and discussion of the relation of science and philosophy in antiquity; Greek schools of thought and Roman interpretation of Hellenistic ideas. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 201 or HIST 281 or GNHU 281 or GNHU 282 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 310 or GNHU 313 or GNHU 332 or GNHU 351 or GNHU 355 or GNHU 357 or GNHU 358 or GNHU 359 or GNHU 360 or GNHU 361 or GNHU 362 or GNHU 370 or GNHU 381 or GNHU 382 or GNHU 383 or GNHU 384 or GNHU 385 or GNHU 396.

GNHU470: Seminar in Classical Humanities (3 hours seminar)

Topic to be selected according to faculty and student interest and developed through an interdisciplinary approach. May be repeated twice for a maximum of 9.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 106 or HONP 101 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 310 or GNHU 313 or GNHU 320 or GNHU 332 or GNHU 345 or GNHU 351 or GNHU 355 or GNHU 357 or GNHU 358 or GNHU 359 or GNHU 360 or GNHU 361 or GNHU 362 or GNHU 370 or GNHU 380 or GNHU 381 or GNHU 382 or GNHU 383 or GNHU 384 or GNHU 385 or GNHU 396.

GNHU490: Principles of Mythic Symbolism (3 hours lecture)

This course examines the origins and patterns of mythic symbolism as discussed by various theorists of myth in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Given the interdisciplinary nature of the study of myth, the course examines theories derived from various disciplines, including literature, religion, philosophy, psychology, anthropology, women's studies and others. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: GNHU 310 or GNHU 320 or GNHU 332 or GNHU 351 or GNHU 381 or GNHU 383 or GNHU 385 or departmental approval.

GNHU499: Senior Humanities Seminar (4 hours seminar)

A seminar for majors. The student will develop, in a senior thesis or other creative project, an interdisciplinary approach to an idea or problem rising from his concentration. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Senior standing as a general humanities major. Starting Winter 2016: General Humanities (GNHU) majors only; GNHU 313 or GNHU 320 or GNHU 332 or GNHU 345 or GNHU 380 or GNHU 355 or GNHU 357 or GNHU 358 or GNHU 359 or GNHU 360 or GNHU 361 or GNHU 381 or GNHU 384 or GNHU 385

HIST108: Introduction to African Civilization (3 hours lecture)

Pre-colonial African civilization and its eclipse under slavery and the colonial onslaught. Principal social, political and cultural systems of the period. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

HIST109: Introduction to Islamic Civilization (3 hours lecture)

Examination of various institutions and value systems in Islam which characterize it as a major civilization. Important cultural developments as they are affected by the process of transition. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

HIST114: Early Latin America (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide a background in the main issues, themes and events in the history of colonial Latin America, including an introduction to the pre-contact (pre-1492) histories of Spain, Portugal and the Americas. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

HIST115: History of Puerto Rico (3 hours lecture)

The history and culture of Puerto Rico and interaction with Spain, Latin America and the United States. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

HIST116: Modern Latin America (3 hours lecture)

This course offers an introduction to the history of Latin America, with an emphasis on the period since the 1810s. Students unfamiliar with the region should emerge from the course with a firm grounding in the major themes of modern Latin American history. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

HIST128: Pre-Modern Japan: A History of Japan to the Meiji Restoration (3 hours lecture)

This is an introductory survey course in Japanese history from earliest times to the Meiji (1868-1912). It is a first step in Japan studies designed to provide a broad, useful, working knowledge of key aspects of traditional Japan. Culture, politics, society and economy will be built into a chronological, historical structure. Japan's uniqueness will be outlined against a background of greater East Asian and world interactions. This course will stand on its own, but will also serve as a useful background to understanding modern and contemporary Japan. The course also aspires to sensitizing students to the inherent value of East Asian culture as a part of human richness and diversity. 3 sh.

HIST129: Modern Japan: A History of Japan From the Meiji Through the Showa (3 hours lecture)

This is an introductory survey course in Japanese history from the Meiji (1868-1912) through the Showa (1925-present). While it would be useful to study premodern Japan before taking this course, modern Japan does stand on its own. A review of traditional Japan will be followed by study of the dynamic interaction of Japan and the West during the 19th Century. Japan's expansionism, World War II and the postwar period will be important topics. Cultural, military, economic, political, and social developments will be discussed in historical settings. Students will be encouraged to appreciate the unique dynamics of Japan's development as a modern nation state and to explore the likely progress of Japan into the 21st Century. 3 sh.

HIST131: Introduction to Indian Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The early history of India, 3000 B.C. to 1000 A.D. Principal religions, political and literary works, and their insights into Indian social values and institutions. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

HIST132: Introduction to Chinese Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The early history of China, 2000 B.C. to 1300 A.D. Principal social, political and metaphysical-philosophic works, corresponding values and institutions. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

HIST133: Modern Chinese Civilization (3 hours lecture)

Modern China, 1600 to the present. Changes in values and mutual influence of East and West, studied through literary, philosophical, anthropological, historical and artistic works. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

HIST204: The Second World War (3 hours lecture)

A study of the origins and course of World War II in Europe, Asia and the Pacific. 3 sh.

HIST212: Social History of the United States (3 hours lecture)

Social and cultural aspects of American history: population movements, rural and urban problems, status of women, utopian ventures, mass media, recreation, human rights. 3 sh.

HIST213: Economic History of the United States (3 hours lecture)

Major trends in agriculture, commerce, finance, manufacturing, transportation and industrial relations from colonial beginnings to the present. Cross listed with Economics and Finance, ECON 213. 3 sh.

HIST214: Diplomatic History of the United States (3 hours lecture)

Evolution of American foreign policy and diplomacy from the Revolution to the present. Selected basic readings in the field. 3 sh.

HIST215: Women in American History (3 hours lecture)

The changing role and status of women in American society from colonial times to the present. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

HIST217: History of Black Americans (3 hours lecture)

Role of Americans of African descent in the development of the United States. Contributions of black Americans from initial discovery and exploration to mid-20th century. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

HIST218: Political History of the United States (3 hours lecture)

The historical development of American political institutions from the early 1700s to the present. Focus upon the evolution of constitutional and legal structures, the party system and pressure groups, the role of bureaucracies, and the impact of political leaders. 3 sh.

HIST219: Sport in History (3 hours lecture)

This course takes a global approach to the history of sport, but focuses on the role of sport in American history. It examines sport in early world cultures, the development of sport as a mass spectator phenomenon in modern times, and the social significance of sport in the contemporary world. 3 sh.

HIST221: Europe's Conquest of the Americas, 1415-1763 (3 hours lecture)

A study of European explorations, discoveries and territorial settlements in the Americas during the 15th to the 18th century. Examination of the expansion and impact of Europe -- institutions, ideas, traditions, technologies -- and resulting confrontations with and impact on native American peoples. 3 sh.

HIST222: Economic History of Europe (3 hours lecture)

European economic development from the Middle Ages to the present. Emphasis on the first industrial revolution in Britain; comparing 19th century economic growth in Britain, France, Germany and Russia. Cross listed with Economics and Finance, ECON 222. 3 sh.

HIST223: Communist Revolution in China (3 hours lecture)

Ideological and historical significance studied against the background of domestic and international events, personalities and ideologies. 3 sh.

HIST281: Greek Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Greek world from the Bronze Age to the Roman Conquest as seen through literary, documentary, and archaeological sources. Cross listed with Classics and General Humanities, GNHU 281. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. 3 sh.

HIST282: Roman Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Roman world from the Regal Period to Justinian as seen through literary, documentary and archaeological sources. Cross listed with Classics and General Humanities, GNHU 282. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, American or European History. 3 sh.

HIST309: Feminist Ideas in Western Thought (3 hours lecture)

History of feminist ideas and theories about women and womanhood. Students examine important theoretical literature in Europe and America from 18th century to present. Original texts of Wollstonecroft, Fuller, Mill, and Freud will be considered against their socio-historic milieu. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST310: Immigrant in American History (3 hours lecture)

The processes by which the immigrant was incorporated into American society. Includes the cultural backgrounds from which the different groups came; the reasons for emigration; the nature of the communities they created once they reached the U.S.; their religious and social institutions; the problems of maintaining ethnic culture with the pressure to Americanize. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST312: Historical Geography of the United States (3 hours lecture)

The slow pace of settlement of the eastern seaboard and the development of distinctive culture hearths prior to 1800; the rapid settlement and diffusion of culture traits in the area beyond the Appalachians since 1809. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST315: War in History (3 hours lecture)

Examines selected wars in the history of the world in an attempt to learn about causes and consequences of war. Consider attempts to prevent war in the past, and proposed methods for preventing war in the future. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST322: Medieval European Civilization 450-1350 (3 hours lecture)

Origins, development, and significance of a civilization whose political, social and cultural foundations had a spiritual basis and unity. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST323: History of Russia to 1917 (3 hours lecture)

Factors shaping the Russian people: Byzantium and Greek Orthodox faith, Tartar state organization, the Mir, Westernization from Peter to Lenin, intellectual and radical movements. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST324: Russia Since 1917 (3 hours lecture)

Political, social, economic and intellectual developments in the Soviet Union and Russia; the relationship of ideology and national goals. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST326: Modern German History (3 hours lecture)

German society, culture and politics from 1789 to the present. The formation of a unified state in the nineteenth century. The effects of World War I and of National Socialism. The division of Germany after World War II and the reunification of the country in 1989-90. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST327: History of France Since 1789 (3 hours lecture)

Political, social, economic and intellectual developments in France since the Revolution. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST328: Conflict in Modern Ireland (3 hours lecture)

A history of Irish nationalism with emphasis on the period from 1782 to the present. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST329: History of England to 1714 (3 hours lecture)

Emphasis on political and constitutional history, the formation of basic institutions of law and government and related economic, social and cultural factors. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST330: Chinese Social History Through Literature (3 hours lecture)

Masterpieces of the Chinese literary tradition from earliest times to the 20th century. Literary genre in historical perspective and as expression of social and cultural values. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST331: History of England 1714-1914 (3 hours lecture)

Political, social and economic history from the Hanoverian succession to the 20th century: Industrial Revolution, changing balance of the constitution, British imperialism, the Irish question. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST333: History of Brazil (3 hours lecture)

Traces the historical development from the pre-historical Indian cultures to the 1970s; covers the social, cultural, political, economic and religious aspects of the largest Latin-American nation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST334: Women in the Muslim World: A History of Representations (3 hours lecture)

A survey of writings by and about Muslim women examined historiographically. We examine conventional wisdom about Muslim women through the ages, and how this "wisdom" was constructed: Who wrote about Muslim women? When? How? What purposes have these writings served at different times and places since the inception of Islam and during the course of its 1,500 year history. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Passing grade in the following: HIST 100; HIST 117 or 118; HIST 103 or 105 or 106; 108 or 109 or 114 or 116 or 128 or 129 or 131 or 132 or 133.

HIST411: Intellectual History of the United States (3 hours lecture)

Development and contributions of the thought of individuals and groups, dominant and minority, and their effect on the American mind, traditions and practices. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST415: European Social History (3 hours lecture)

This course will introduce history majors and other interested students to European social history in particular and social history in general. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST416: Church and State in Latin America (3 hours lecture)

The Roman Catholic church as the major spiritual institution as well as a cultural, moral, political and economic force in Latin America. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST419: Age of Renaissance, 1350-1517 (3 hours lecture)

Political, economic, social and broad cultural developments in Italy and Western Europe during 1350-1517. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST420: The Reformation Era, 1500-1650 (3 hours lecture)

Religious movements of the 16th and 17th centuries; their medieval antecedents; the accompanying political, intellectual and socioeconomic forces. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST422: Studies in Enlightenment History (3 hours lecture)

Major intellectual developments in 18th century Europe: rise of skepticism, toleration, empiricism, idea of progress. Readings in Hume, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Kant and antecedent figures. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST424: Diplomatic History of Europe (3 hours lecture)

Diplomatic history of Europe since the Congress of Vienna. Emphasis on development of diplomatic practice and relations between states during 1870 to present. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST426: The Nazi Third Reich (3 hours lecture)

Major economic, social, political and intellectual developments in 20th century Germany. Demise of Weimar Republic and ascension of Nazi Third Reich. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST427: The Holocaust, 1939-1945 (3 hours lecture)

The history of the Holocaust and an overview of its representations in the academic historiography as well as in literary and autobiographical texts. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST430: Revolutions in Latin American History (3 hours lecture)

Examines and compares the causes, course and consequences of three major social revolutions in Latin America: Mexico (1910), Bolivia (1952), Cuba (1959). 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST431: Development of Indian Character and Culture (3 hours lecture)

The historical conditioning of Indian behavior. Culture change in the perspective of colonialism and modernization; contributions of religion to social and political values and modern literature. Cross listed with Anthropology, ANTH 431. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 OR HIST 100.

HIST432: Development of Japanese Character and Culture (3 hours lecture)

The historical conditioning of Japanese behavior. Cultural change in the perspective of traditional periodization of Japanese history. Contributions of religion and philosophy to defining social values. Cross listed with Anthropology, ANTH 432. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ANTH 100 OR HIST 100; and HIST 117 or HIST 118.

HIST433: American Colonial History 1607-1763 (3 hours lecture)

Developments within the English colonies, interactions between England and the colonists, growth of a distinctive American society. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST435: The Union in Crisis 1820-1877 (3 hours lecture)

Significant events and developments of the period: Jacksonian democracy, westward expansion and sectionalism, the Civil War and Reconstruction. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST436: America in the Gilded Age (3 hours lecture)

The forces which contributed to the development of modern, industrialized America; American society and its reaction to changes of the period. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; and HIST 117 or 118.

HIST437: American Society in the 20th Century (3 hours lecture)

The continuing reactions to the problems of an industrialized America. The New Deal and recent Supreme Court decisions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HIST438: America in the Sixties: The Crisis of Consensus Liberalism (3 hours lecture)

Analyzes the crisis of American liberalism as that ideology was beset by the consequences of postwar affluence and the growing radicalism during the Kennedy-Johnson administration; and the backlash that developed into the Nixon "New Majority". 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HIST 100; AND HIST 117 OR HIST 118.

HLTH101: Personal Health Issues (3 hours lecture)

Personal Health Issues examines health through six interrelated dimensions: physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, interpersonal and social, and environmental. This course examines how health choices impact society and the health of a community. Additionally, health policies and societal health issues are examined for their impact on the individual. This course emphasizes contemporary health issues using the national initiative Health People 2010 as a framework. Assessing health status, increasing health competencies to enhance decision-making skills, eliciting health-promoting behaviors, and interpreting existing and proposed social actions that ultimately affect individual, family, community and environmental health are central focuses of this course. 3 sh.

HLTH207: Safety, Accidents and Emergency Care. Starting Winter 2016: Injury Prevention and Emergency Care (3 hours lecture)

Provides for study of major safety areas including transportation, public safety, industrial and home safety. Emergency health care, first aid treatment, and preventive measures are considered in the context of individual, agency and institutional responsibilities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 102.

HLTH210: Consumer Health (3 hours lecture)

Interpretation of individual economic activity as it relates to health service and health products. Includes analysis of factors influencing consumer health attitudes and behavior. 3 sh.

HLTH213: Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of licit as well as illicit drug use in contemporary society from the perspective of selected biomedical and psychosocial disciplines. Examines the effects of drugs on the individual and society in the context of changing social conditions and technological developments. Analyzes complex nature of the drug problem and rehabilitative and preventive measures and tentative solutions to this important aspect of human existence. 3 sh.

HLTH220: Mental Health (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of human emotional adjustment throughout the life cycle from biomedical and psychosocial perspectives. The factors that foster the development of emotional and mental well-being and the forces that contribute to the breakdown of human adjustment capabilities are identified and analyzed in light of research and clinical literature. Special attention is given to the strategies for the prevention of mental disorders and promotion of mental health. 3 sh.

HLTH290: Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

Students will explore many interacting cultural, personal and health factors relating to human sexual development, attitudes, and behaviors. Historical, anthropological, biological/physiological, socio-cultural and psychological factors will be introduced to encourage a broad perspective. Discussion of differing philosophical, ethical and moral positions will also aid students in making a critical assessment of intimate human relationships and acquaint them with criteria and processes for understanding themselves as sexual beings. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

HLTH307: The Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of diseases, their etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Includes a review of causation theories and incidence patterns and focuses on major degenerative, neoplastic, metabolic, immunologic, and infectious diseases. Attention is given to prevention and control measures with an emphasis on the role of selected health/medical resources in disease management. Offered as HLTH 307 through Fall 2015. To become HLTH 208 effective Winter 2016. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 105 or HPEM 150 or ATTR 201 and at least one 200-level course in HLTH, HPEM, or ATTR.

HLTH314: Public Health Aspects of Alcohol Abuse (3 hours lecture)

Examines the impact of alcohol abuse on public health. Society's attempts to diminish the impact are also explored. Includes study of effects of alcohol abuse on the family and workplace; prevention modalities and rehabilitation programs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 213 or HLTH 215.

HLTH330: Foundations of Health Education. Starting Winter 2016: Health Education Methods (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of the scientific, social, behavioral, educational, and legal foundations of health education. Traces the evolution and interprets the impact of related professions on school, community, and allied health education. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Health. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 204.

HLTH411: School Health and Community Services (3 hours lecture)

Provides for an in-depth understanding of the school health program and community services. Includes study of school and health services, healthful school environment, and health education and community health services. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 330.

HLTH430: Health Counseling. Starting Winter 2016: Counseling Skills for Public Health Professionals (3 hours lecture)

Course focuses on factors influencing health and illness behavior with implications for behavioral intervention in health care. Included are the intervention strategies of prevention, crisis intervention, postvention and compliance, and the intervention techniques of assessment, interviewing, counseling skills and small group dynamics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 220 or HLTH 222 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 330.

HONP210: Honors Seminar in Science (3 hours seminar, 2 hours lab)

Interdisciplinary course in the natural and physical sciences consisting of seminars and laboratory experience. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: For Honors Program students only or by permission of instructor.

HONP211: Honors Seminar in Contemporary Issues in Science (3 hours seminar)

Interdisciplinary course in the natural and physical sciences applying the scientific method, scientific data analysis, reasoning and logic to selected contemporary issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: For Honors Program students only or by permission of instructor.

HPEM150: Principles and Practice of Emergency Care (3 hours lecture)

Provides for study of emergency care management. Provides knowledge and skills for teaching principles and practices of emergency care in a school or adult fitness setting. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: Exercise Science (ESCI) or Physical Education w/ conc: Adult Fitness (PEAF) majors only or departmental approval.

JURI324: Legal Reasoning (3 hours lecture)

Theoretical foundations for developing models and methods of addressing legal problems. Principles of legal reasoning and argument in the Anglo-American common law tradition. Models of legal reasoning and methodology for resolving legal problems as developed within evolving social and philosophical notions of justice and fairness. Cross listed with Philosophy and Religion, PHIL 324. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Jurisprudence. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or PHIL 206 or PHIL 212 or departmental approval.

JUST360: Rights, Liberties and American Justice (3 hours lecture)

An integrated approach to the study of individual rights, liberties, and American justice. The development of constitutional law in its social, political, and cultural contexts. The growth of the legal tradition and recent developments in relation to statutory law in shaping the principles of American liberty. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JUST 101 or JUST 102 or JUST 200 or JUST 201 or departmental approval.

LAWS391: Women and the Law (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to and evaluation of the changing patterns of gender-based laws in the United States in terms of the preferences they reflect and the rationales used to justify them. Emphasis on issues which impact upon women's rights, relevant case law which impacts upon the roles and rights of women, and legislation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or WMGS 102.

MTHM201: Mathematics in Elementary Schools I (3 hours lecture)

This course is intended for undergraduate students seeking certification to teach early childhood and elementary school (P-3, K-6). The course will provide prospective early childhood and elementary school teachers with opportunities to develop deep, connected understandings of (1) content included in the Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Number & Operations strands of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM), as well as (2) factors that influence student learning of that content, (3) characteristics of instruction that are effective in promoting development of student understanding of the concepts from operations and algebraic thinking and number and operations included in the Pre-K through grade 6 mathematics curriculum, and (4) research on student learning of Pre-K through grade 6 operations and algebraic thinking and number and operations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200.

MTHM302: Mathematics in Elementary Schools II (3 hours lecture)

The course is intended for undergraduate students seeking certification to teach early childhood and elementary school (P-3, K-6). The course will provide prospective early childhood and elementary school teachers with opportunities to develop deep, connected understandings of (1) content included in the Geometry, Measurement & Data, and Fraction Operations strands of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM), as well as (2) factors that influence Pre-K through grade 6 student learning of that content, (3) characteristics of classroom instruction that are effective in promoting development of student understanding of elementary geometry, measurement and data, and fraction operations, and (4) research on student learning of elementary school geometry, measurement and data, and fraction operations. Previous course MTHM 202 effective through Spring 2011. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200 and MTHM 201.

MUGN100: Introduction to Music (3 hours lecture)

A guide to the understanding and enjoyment of western art music through study of its principal elements: melody, rhythm, harmony, form. Comparisons to musics of other parts of the world. Discussion of the ways, implicit and explicit, in which art music can serve political or social purposes. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Fine and Performing Arts. 3 sh.

MUGN109: Introduction to Jazz (3 hours lecture)

Jazz as an American phenomenon. Musical materials as manipulated by jazz artists; the impact on American popular music, dance and theater; early jazz players and developments. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Fine and Performing Arts. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Previous course MUGN 209 effective through Spring 2014. 3 sh.

MUGN120: Rap and Rock as Cultural Phenomena (2 hours lecture, 1 hour lab)

This course will explore the creative process in music of urban cultures. It will examine social structures, and the criteria of the groups which make and appreciate styles that emanate from urban cultures. Rap music will be the primary focus. Attention will also be given to other styles, such as Rock, rooted in the same historical background. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Fine and Performing Arts. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Previous course MUGN 250 effective through Spring 2014. 3 sh.

MUGN136: The History of Broadway (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to the varieties of style in music for the purpose of extending dramatic action, characterization and atmosphere in musicals, operettas and musical comedies. Representative works from 1927 to present. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Fine and Performing Arts. Previous course MUGN 236 effective through Spring 2014. 3 sh.

MUGN150: Influence of Afro-American Culture on Music (3 hours lecture)

Ways in which the Afro-American culture has affected the development of American folk and art music. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

MUGN160: Introduction to Music in World Cultures (3 hours lecture)

The cultural and artistic forces which shape the musics of the non-Western world and the various folk and art musics resulting from those forces. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Fine and Performing Arts. 3 sh.

NUFD182: Nutrition (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to give students a general knowledge of the components of the food we eat, the nutrients necessary for a healthy life, the functions of nutrients and the interrelationships and metabolism of nutrients. The factors which influence the recommended dietary intake of nutrients, and theories and guidelines for screening nutrition risk and disease and prevention are presented. 3 sh.

PHIL102: Ethics (3 hours lecture)

The nature of ethical judgments, the meaning of moral concepts, the conditions of moral responsibility and the methodological presuppositions of ethical theories in philosophy and religion. Meets the 2002 General Education Requirement - Humanities, Philolosphy/Religion. 3 sh.

PHIL202: Ethics and Business (3 hours lecture)

A study of the meaning of morality in the modern world of business. Course contains balance of theory and practice as it examines behavior of business against background of conflicting ethical theory. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL204: Philosophical Issues in Biomedical Ethics (3 hours lecture)

A study of moral decision making in regard to specific moral problems arising in such areas of contemporary medical research and practice as experimentation on human subjects, euthanasia, abortion, information rights of patients, and eugenic sterilization. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL206: Philosophical Issues in Law and Justice (3 hours lecture)

An examination of philosophical approaches to current issues related to law and justice. Close attention will be paid to one or more of the following specific issues: freedom of religion, freedom of expression, gay rights, reproductive rights, or civil disobedience and political protest. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106 or RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL212: Social and Political Philosophy (3 hours lecture)

The nature of society and the state, their relation to each other and to the individual, and an evaluation of some main political and social ideals. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL231: American Philosophy (3 hours lecture)

The major American philosophers and philosophical movements with emphasis on Peirce, James, Royce, and Dewey. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL233: Contemporary Philosophers (3 hours lecture)

The major movements in contemporary philosophy, studied through writings of leading exponents. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL237: Asian Philosophy (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the major movements and thinkers in Asian philosophy. It acquaints students with Asian philosophical interpretations of experience and reality found in both classical and contemporary Confucianism, Mohism, Daoism, Buddhism, and Hinduism in Eastern cultures. Meets Gen Ed 2002-Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Offered as PHIL 137 through Winter 2013. To become PHIL 237 effective Spring 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL239: Existentialism (3 hours lecture)

The major themes and concepts of existentialism in selected writings of the existentialist philosophers. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL260: Philosophies of Art (3 hours lecture)

The major philosophies of art in the history of Western thought. The conceptual network of ideas of the thinker in question will be delineated, and connections shown between the thinker and the philosophical and artistic themes of that period. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL262: Philosophy of Religion (3 hours lecture)

The nature and shape of religious experience, criteria for meaning within religious thought and language; metaphysical and epistemological implications of such questions as the nature and existence of god, and the possibility of life after death. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL264: Critical Reasoning and Arguments (3 hours lecture)

An intermediary level course concentrating upon argumentation and rhetorical devices as they actually function in everyday conversation, philosophical discussion, forensic debate, etc. Arguments will be examined with an eye to penetrating purely formal structure and discovering the underlying dynamics which contribute to cogency in a given context. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL266: Philosophy of Science (3 hours lecture)

The epistemological character of scientific thought and the relevance of scientific findings for the clarification and eventual resolution of traditional philosophical issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL270: Philosophy of Mind (3 hours lecture)

Philosophical issues arising from the study of mental processes including the relation of a person to the body, life after death, and the possible reduction of consciousness to a brain process. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL271: Philosophy of Sport (3 hours lecture)

Survey of the philosophical aspects of sport along with development of philosophical ideas about sport from the origins of competitive sport to the present. Special attention will be paid to such classic issues as the ontological status of games, sport as moral education, and athletics as substitutes for war. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL280: Philosophy of Cyberspace (3 hours lecture)

Contemporary and classical philosophical and ethical issues as applied to computer-mediated communication. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL290: Fields of Philosophy: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture)

Selected study of major fields in philosophy. Philosophy of science, philosophy of history, philosophy of law. Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

PHIL295: Periods and Movements: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture)

Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL297: Periods and Movements: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture)

Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

PHIL310: Knowledge, Belief and Truth (3 hours lecture)

The major issues and theories concerning the relationship between knowledge, experience and reality. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL312: Existence and Reality (3 hours lecture)

An examination of major philosophical theories concerning the nature of reality. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL316: Philosophy of Law (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the philosophical issues of jurisprudence. Close attention is given to the status and nature of law, the concept of equality and the limits of law. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL324: Legal Reasoning (3 hours lecture)

Theoretical foundations for developing models and methods of addressing legal problems. Principles of legal reasoning and argument in the Anglo-American common law tradition. Models of legal reasoning and methodology for resolving legal problems as developed within evolving social and philosophical notions of justice and fairness. Pre-law Minor. Cross listed with Political Science and Law, JURI 324. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Jurisprudence. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: JURI 210 or LAWS 200 or PHIL 206 or PHIL 212.

PHIL330: Philosophy and Death (3 hours seminar)

Seminar devoted to philosophical, mainly ethical and metaphysical, questions about death. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL331: History of Philosophy: Ancient Philosophy (3 hours lecture)

The major philosophical systems and movements from the pre-Socratics to Plotinus with special emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Philosophy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL333: History of Philosophy: Modern Philosophy (3 hours lecture)

The major philosophical systems and movements from the Renaissance to Kant. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Philosophy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL334: Theoretical and Applied Ethics (3 hours seminar)

Advanced seminar covering ethical theory and its application to post-modernism and other forms of relativism, the meaning of moral language and the possibility of religious and secular ethical foundations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL335: Nineteenth Century Philosophy (3 hours lecture)

A study of the major philosophical figures and movements of the nineteenth century, with special emphasis on Hegel and the Hegelian tradition. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL390: Fields of Philosophy: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture)

Selected study of major fields in philosophy. Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL395: Periods and Movements: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture)

Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL397: Periods and Movements: Selected Topics (3 hours lecture)

Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 200 or PHIL 212 or PHIL 237 or PHIL 239 or PHIL 260 or PHIL 262 or PHIL 270 or PHIL 280.

PHIL424: Seminar in Philosophy (3 hours seminar)

Cooperative research seminars in major movements, problems, philosophers or works. Topic announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 310 or PHIL 312 or PHIL 331 or PHIL 333 or PHIL 376 or PHIL 390 or PHIL 395.

POLS204: Government and Politics of Africa (3 hours lecture)

The salient characteristics of government and politics in the independent black African states, and the way these impinge on developmental efforts therein, are examined. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

POLS206: Government and Politics of China and Japan (3 hours lecture)

Governmental and political development, institutions, and practices in contemporary China-Japan. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

POLS215: Ethnic Politics in America (3 hours lecture)

The political behavior of American ethnic groups from the Puritans to the Puerto Ricans. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

POLS216: Urban Politics (3 hours lecture)

The policies, processes, inter-relationships and organization of governments in heavily populated areas of the United States. 3 sh.

POLS307: American Political Thought (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide an introduction to the main strands of American political thought from the founding of the American colonies to the present day. Our goal will be to come to grips with the major questions that have driven our politics throughout the nation's history. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 300 or JURI 300.

POLS312: Black Politics in America (3 hours lecture)

Black participation in the American political system from the colonial period to the present. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS318: The American Presidency (3 hours lecture)

This course will provide a detailed examination of the American presidency. It will allow students who were introduced to the presidency in POLS 101, American Government and Politics, to explore in depth one of the key institutions of the American political system. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or departmental approval.

POLS323: American Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties (3 hours lecture)

The development of the constitution and the Supreme Court of the United States illustrated through reference to court opinions in civil rights and liberties. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 101 or LAWS 200 or JURI 210 or departmental approval.

POLS339: Contemporary Western European Politics (3 hours lecture)

Government and politics of Great Britain, France, Germany and Italy. Institutions, parties, ideologies and interest groups. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or departmental approval.

POLS342: Government and Politics of the Middle East (3 hours lecture)

Government and politics in the Arab states, Turkey, Israel and Iran. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: POLS 201 or departmental approval.

PSYC101: Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course is an introduction to the study of human behavior and surveys major topics within the diverse discipline of psychology. Topics covered will come from each of four core areas offered by the psychology department: Social/Applied (e.g., Social, Industrial-Organizational, Health), Biological Basis of Behavior (e.g., Physiology, Perception, Motivation/Emotion, Comparative Animal Behavior), Cognition (e.g., Learning and Memory, Conditioning and Learning, Cognition, Language) and Personality (e.g., Personality, Abnormal, Development). Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science for non-psychology majors only. 3 sh.

READ399: Early Literacy Development and Instruction (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces future teachers to language and literacy development and instruction in preschool through 3rd grade classrooms. Students learn the components and stages of literacy development from emergent literacy through reading fluency, and examine the cognitive, linguistic, sociocultural and instructional influences on this process. Students carry out an assessment of a child's reading and build a repertoire of culturally responsive teaching practices that address the five essential components of reading instruction identified by the National Reading Panel (2000) (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). They practice standards-based lesson planning and design instructional adaptations for English Language Learners. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

READ408: Literacy in the Elementary Grades (3 hours lecture)

In this course, prospective elementary teachers continue their exploration of key theories and methods for teaching literacy, with an emphasis on the intermediate grades. They focus on reading comprehension, vocabulary development, writing instruction, literacy across the content areas, and the use of technology to develop a breadth of pedagogical knowledge. Particular attention is given to developing expertise in differentiated instructional planning that meets a diverse range of learners, including English Language Learners, students with learning disabilities, struggling readers, and advanced students. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: READ 399.

RELG200: Old Testament: Genesis to Joshua (3 hours lecture)

The evolution of the ancient Hebrew world view as developed in the biblical books covering the early period of Israelite history. The course includes a close reading of the books of Genesis, Exodus and numbers, comparison with contemporary Middle Eastern religious texts and study of the biblical story from the creation through the career of Moses (circa 1250 B.C.E.). 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106 or RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG202: Old Testament: Joshua to Daniel (3 hours lecture)

The history and theology of Israelite religion as seen in the biblical books covering the middle and late periods (1150-165 B.C.E.). 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG204: New Testament: Jesus and the Gospels (3 hours lecture)

The story of Jesus of Nazareth as told in the gospels of Mark and Matthew. The course explores Old Testament backgrounds, Jesus' place in the Jewish religious context of first century Israel, the question of the historical Jesus and the origins of and relationships between the various gospel traditions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG206: New Testament: Paul and the Early Church (3 hours lecture)

A close study of Luke-Acts, John, selected letters of Paul and other later epistles. The course explores the development of the theology and institutions of the early church as revealed in New Testament documents of the first and early second centuries. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG207: Religious Texts in America: Women (3 hours lecture)

Course will examine original texts by women written during the religious growth and development of such movements as Evangelicalism, Mormonism, the Westward missionary expansion, African-American slave narratives, hymns, sermons, and exhortations. Emphasis will be on the ways religion served as an acceptable locus of expression for women. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG209: Introduction to Greek and Roman Religion (3 hours lecture)

A survey of religious thought and practices as they applied to individual, family and society among the Greeks and Romans, and how these items contributed to the religious life of the modern Western world. Cross listed with GNHU 209. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

RELG213: Buddhism (3 hours lecture)

The exploration of Buddhist teachings, practices, history, and religious art in various Asian countries, notably India, Southeast Asia, Japan, and Tibet (may vary). No prerequisites, but RELG 100, Religions of the World, is suggested. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106 or RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG214: Classical Texts of Asian Religions (3 hours lecture)

This course emphasizes critical analysis and interpretation of primary textual sources. Students will read and examine primary documents from each of the Asian religions, their traditional interpretations and recent understandings and applications of these texts. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG215: Hinduism (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to Hindu religious traditions, including philosophy, yoga practice, ritual workshop, and sacred art. No prerequisites, but RELG 100 Religions of the World is suggested. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG217: Taoism (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to Taoist religious texts and traditions, including Tao Te Ching and Chuang Tzu; Taoist connections with traditional Chinese medicine and martial arts; Taoist ritual traditions; and sacred art. No prerequisites, but RELG 100 Religions of the World is recommended. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG218: Death, Dying and Afterlife (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to give students the opportunity to study cross-cultural religious practices and attitudes toward death, dying and the afterlife. The course will cover the grieving process, rituals of death, and various cultural attitudes toward death, including symbolic "deaths" (initiations), and belief in limbo states, soul-survival, ghosts, heaven, hell, and karma and reincarnation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG221: Religion and Culture (3 hours lecture)

The interrelation of religion and culture in the formulation of human values and views, life-styles and institutions. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

RELG223: Religion in North America (3 hours lecture)

The growth and development of various religious movements-- Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, and sectarian minorities-- from colonial times to the present. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG225: Religion and Social Change (3 hours lecture)

The impact of economic, social and political movements on religious belief and the ways in which religion has both furthered and impeded social development. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106 or RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG240: Asian Religions (3 hours lecture)

The cultural and theological bases for the faith and practice of major Eastern religions--Buddhism, Confucianism, Hinduism, Taoism. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Previous course RELG 212 effective through Winter 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. Starting Winter 2016: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

RELG246: Islamic Religious Traditions (3 hours lecture)

The course will start by examining the rise of Islam through the eyes of two fundamental Islamic texts, the Qur'an and the biography of Prophet Muhammad. It will then explore the history of Islam's formative and classical periods (632-1258 CE) in terms of theology, philosophy, jurisprudence, and mysticism, while emphasizing diversity of perspectives. The heart of Islam will be approached through the teachings of the Qur'an, hadith and the Islamic intellectual tradition. The encounter between Islam and other religious traditions will also be traced briefly. Major trends in contemporary Islam (traditionalism, liberalism, revivalism, etc.) will be identified and discussed through the writings of their major proponents. Meets General Education 2002, K2 NonWestern requirement. Previous course RELG 116 effective through Winter 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. Starting Winter 2016: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

RELG254: Native American Religion (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the religious traditions and spirituality of the Native American peoples. The course recognizes the value of oral tradition and ritual practices in Native American religions and cultures as well as the variety that exists within this set of traditions. Meets Gen Ed 2002-Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Previous course RELG 110 effective through Winter 2013. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. Starting Winter 2016: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

RELG256: Religion in Latin America (3 hours lecture)

A survey of the ways religion, both indigenous and Western, has interacted with culture and society in Latin America. Particular emphasis is given to the diversity of religious expressions, including indigenous religions (Mayan, Aztec, and Quechua), syncretistic religions (i.e., Voodoo and Santeria), alternative and evangelical forms of Christianity, contemporary popular religious expression, and liberation theology. Meets Gen Ed 2002 Requirements - Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. Starting Winter 2016: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

RELG258: Christian History and Thought (3 hours lecture)

A survey of the history of the development of the Christian world-view, the evolution of Christian institutions and doctrines, and the triumphs and failures of Christianity through the period of the Reformation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG262: Philosophy of Religion (3 hours lecture)

A philosophical examination of religion. It includes the nature and shape of religious experience: criteria for meaning within religious thought and language, metaphysical and epistemological implications of such questions as the nature and existence of God, and the possibility of life after death. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG263: Religion and Psychology (3 hours lecture)

The views of faith and the religious person reached by such major psychological approaches as the Freudian, neo-Freudian, analytic-ego, existential and Jungian. The implications of such psychology for Jewish, Catholic, and Protestant believers and religious thinkers. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG267: Women and Religion (3 hours lecture)

Focuses on women's own experience in religions and the various perspectives of women held by both Eastern and Western religious traditions. The course deals with questions such as the nature of women, patriarchy and religion, and roles of women in religions. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Religious Studies. Meets World Cultures Requirement. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG273: The Holocaust: Religious Perspectives (3 hours lecture)

A study of Nazi extermination of 6,000,000 Jews during World War II and the moral and religious issues raised by this event. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106; RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102.

RELG300: Classics of Western Religious Thought (3 hours lecture)

Selected works of significant theologians of the Western tradition on issues such as the nature of God, christology, soteriology, ecclesiology, theodicy, etc. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 221 or RELG 240 or RELG 246 or RELG 250 or RELG 252 or RELG 254 or RELG 256 or RELG 267.

RELG301: Jewish Spirituality and Mysticism (3 hours lecture)

The writings of Rosenzweig, Buber, Heschel, Rubenstein, Fackenheim, Plaskow, Wyschogrod and others will be examined in detail. They will be studied in the context of the religious crisis of modern society which has generated Existentialism, Death of God Theology and radical shifts in Jewish life (the Holocaust and the rebirth of Israel). Students will be introduced to popular Jewish religious practice in America and elsewhere as well as to the most complex Jewish Theological speculation of this century. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 221 or RELG 240 or RELG 246 or RELG 250 or RELG 252 or RELG 254 or RELG 256 or RELG 267.

RELG326: Theology (3 hours lecture)

An introduction to the theological efforts of Jews, Christians, and Muslims to wrestle out "the meaning of" their communal faith in rational, speculative, critical, and creative ways. Includes study of how the most influential Jewish and Christian theologians shaped Western culture, and of how recent and contemporary criticism challenges theological approaches. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 221 or RELG 240 or RELG 246 or RELG 250 or RELG 252 or RELG 254 or RELG 256 or RELG 267.

RELG332: Myth, Meaning and Self (3 hours lecture)

Selected psychological investigations and/or theories of religious phenomena; the implications for constructive theology and positive religious response. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 221 or RELG 240 or RELG 246 or RELG 250 or RELG 252 or RELG 254 or RELG 256 or RELG 267.

RELG350: Selected Study in World Religions (3 hours lecture)

Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 221 or RELG 240 or RELG 246 or RELG 250 or RELG 252 or RELG 254 or RELG 256 or RELG 267.

RELG355: Selected Study in Religion and Culture (3 hours lecture)

Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 221 or RELG 240 or RELG 246 or RELG 250 or RELG 252 or RELG 254 or RELG 256 or RELG 267.

RELG357: Selected Study in Religious Issues (3 hours lecture)

Topics announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 221 or RELG 240 or RELG 246 or RELG 250 or RELG 252 or RELG 254 or RELG 256 or RELG 267.

RELG460: Seminar in World Religions (3 hours seminar)

Cooperative research seminars in major movements, problems, theologians or works. Topic announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 301 or RELG 332 or RELG 350 or RELG 352 or RELG 355 or RELG 357.

RELG462: Seminar in Religious Texts (3 hours seminar)

Cooperative research seminar in major movements, problems, theologians. Topic announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 301 or RELG 332 or RELG 350 or RELG 352 or RELG 355 or RELG 357.

RELG465: Seminar in Religion and Culture (3 hours seminar)

Cooperative research seminars in major movements, problems, theologians. Topic announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 301 or RELG 332 or RELG 350 or RELG 352 or RELG 355 or RELG 357.

RELG467: Seminar in Religious Issues (3 hours seminar)

Cooperative research seminars in major movements, problems, theologians or works. Topic announced each semester. May be repeated three times for a maximum of 12.0 credits. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: RELG 301 or RELG 332 or RELG 350 or RELG 352 or RELG 355 or RELG 357.

RUIN293: Russian Culture & Civilization (3 hours lecture)

The history of Russian culture from the early stages of Slavic civilization to the contemporary post-Soviet Russian Federation. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the arts, especially literature, as a reflection of philosophical, political, and cultural change. No knowledge of Russian is required. Cross listed with Classics and General Humanities, GNHU 293. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Non-Western Cultural Perspectives. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: GNHU 115 or GNHU 151 or ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

SOCI207: Social Structure of American Society (3 hours lecture)

Empirical materials on social structure. Inter-institutional relations as the form of the broad, general structure of American society. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: SOCI 100 or SOCI 102 or SOCI 104 or SOCI 105 or SOCI 106 or SOCI 112 or SOCI 113.