Mathematics Major (B.S.) - Undergraduate with Teacher Certification in Elementary School Teacher in Grades K-6 - 2015 University Catalog


MATHEMATICS MAJOR

Complete 2 requirements:

  1. MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

    Complete 54 semester hours including the following 4 requirement(s):

    1. MATHEMATICS CORE

      Complete the following 5 courses:

      MATH 122 Calculus I (4 hours lecture) 4
      MATH 221 Calculus II (4 hours lecture) 4
      MATH 222 Calculus III (4 hours lecture) 4
      MATH 335 Linear Algebra (4 hours lecture) 4
      MATH 340 Probability (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. MATHEMATICS SPECIALIZATION

      Complete the following 6 courses:

      MATH 320 Transitions to Advanced Mathematics (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 350 College Geometry (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 433 Theory of Numbers (3 hours lecture) 3
      MTHM 201 Mathematics in Elementary Schools I (3 hours lecture) 3
      MTHM 302 Mathematics in Elementary Schools II (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. MATHEMATICS ELECTIVES

      Complete 9 semester hours from the following:

      MATH 323 Complex Variables (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 360 Mathematical Modeling in Biology (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 368 Fluid Mechanics (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 370 Mathematics for Teaching (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 398 Vector Calculus (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 420 Ordinary Differential Equations (4 hours lecture) 4
      MATH 421 Partial Differential Equations (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 425 Advanced Calculus I (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 426 Advanced Calculus II (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 431 Foundations of Modern Algebra (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 450 Foundations of Geometry (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 451 Topology (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 460 Introduction to Applied Mathematics (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 463 Numerical Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 464 Operations Research I (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 465 Operations Research II (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 466 Mathematics of Finance I (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 467 Mathematics of Finance II (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 469 Mathematical Modeling (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 471 Selected Topics in Modern Mathematics (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 475 History of Mathematics (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 485 Applied Combinatorics and Graph Theory (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 487 Introduction to Mathematical Cryptography (3 hours lecture) 3
      MATH 490 Honors Seminar (3 hours seminar) 3
      MATH 491 Research in Mathematics Education (3 hours seminar) 3
      MATH 495 Topics for Undergraduates (1 hour lecture) 1-3
      MATH 497 Mathematics Research I 1-3
      MATH 498 Mathematics Research II 1-3
      STAT 330 Fundamentals of Modern Statistics I (3 hours lecture) 3
      STAT 401 Applied Statistics for the Sciences (3 hours lecture) 3
      STAT 403 Techniques and Applications of Statistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      STAT 441 Statistical Computing (3 hours lecture) 3
      STAT 442 Fundamentals of Modern Statistics II (3 hours lecture) 3
      STAT 443 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (3 hours lecture) 3
      STAT 481 Introduction to Statistical Data Mining (3 hours lecture) 3
      STAT 487 Statistical Genomics (3 hours lecture) 3
      STAT 495 Topics in Statistical Science 1-3
      STAT 497 Undergraduate Research in Statistical Science 1-3
    4. MATHEMATICS COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS

      1. Complete 2 courses:

        CSIT 111 Fundamentals of Programming I (3 hours lecture) 3
        PHYS 191 University Physics I (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
      2. Complete 1 course from the following (Honors program students must complete HONP 210).

        ANTH 101 Physical Anthropology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 100 Biological Sciences (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 109 The Living World (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 110 The Biology of Human Life (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        CHEM 100 Introductory Chemistry (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        EAES 101 Planet Earth (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        EAES 105 Physical Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        EAES 107 Earth and the Environment (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        EAES 201 Understanding Weather and Climate (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        EAES 240 Historical Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        EAES 250 Introduction to Marine Sciences (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
        PHMS 250 Introduction to Marine Sciences (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
  2. TEACHER ED PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS (K-6)

    Complete the following 3 requirement(s):

    1. PRE-PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE

      Complete the following 3 requirements:

      1. PRE-PROFESSIONAL CORE

        Complete for 15 semester hours

        CMST 101 Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture) 3
        EDFD 220 Philosophical Orientation to Education (3 hours lecture) 3
        FCST 214 Child Development I (3 hours lecture) 3
        FCST 314 Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture) 3
        PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture) 3
      2. HEALTH FOR TEACHER EDUCATION

        Complete 1 course from the following, or pass the MSU Health Knowledge Test available through the Center of Pedagogy:

        BIOL 100 Biological Sciences (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 107 Biology for Survival (3 hours lecture) 3
        BIOL 110 The Biology of Human Life (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 215 Human Heredity (3 hours lecture) 3
        BIOL 240 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology I (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        BIOL 241 Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology II (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 3
        BIOL 243 Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
        BIOL 380 Genetics (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) 4
        HLTH 101 Personal Health Issues (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 207 Safety, Accidents and Emergency Care. Starting Winter 2016: Injury Prevention and Emergency Care (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 210 Consumer Health (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 213 Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 220 Mental Health (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 290 Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 307 The Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 314 Public Health Aspects of Alcohol Abuse (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 330 Foundations of Health Education. Starting Winter 2016: Health Education Methods (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 411 School Health and Community Services (3 hours lecture) 3
        HLTH 430 Health Counseling. Starting Winter 2016: Counseling Skills for Public Health Professionals (3 hours lecture) 3
        HONP 210 Honors Seminar in Science (3 hours seminar, 2 hours lab) 4
        HONP 211 Honors Seminar in Contemporary Issues in Science (3 hours seminar) 3
        HPEM 150 Principles and Practice of Emergency Care (3 hours lecture) 3
        NUFD 182 Nutrition (3 hours lecture) 3
      3. MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT

        Complete the following 2 courses:

        MTHM 201 Mathematics in Elementary Schools I (3 hours lecture) 3
        MTHM 302 Mathematics in Elementary Schools II (3 hours lecture) 3
    2. ELEMENTARY ED PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE

      Complete for 18 semester hours

      ECEL 200 Perspectives on Early Childhood and Elementary Education in a Democracy (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other) 3
      ECEL 408 Social Studies and the Arts in Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECEL 418 Social and Cultural Context of Families and Communities (3 hours lecture) 3
      ECEL 427 Explorations: Science, Math, and Technology in the Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture) 3
      READ 399 Early Literacy Development and Instruction (3 hours lecture) 3
      READ 408 Literacy in the Elementary Grades (3 hours lecture) 3
    3. CLINICAL SEQUENCE/STUDENT TEACHING

      Complete the following 2 requirements for 15 semester hours:

      1. Complete the following for 7 semester hours:

        1. Complete 3 courses for 5 semester hours:

          ECEL 412 Seminar I: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms (1 hour seminar) 1
          ECEL 421 Seminar II: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms (1 hour seminar) 1
          ECEL 422 Integrating Elementary Curriculum and Assessment for Equity and Diversity (3 hours lecture) 3
        2. Complete for 2 semester hours.

          ECEL 410 Clinical Experience I: Inclusive Elementary and Early Childhood Classrooms 1-3
      2. Complete for 8 semester hours.

        ECEL 414 Clinical Experience II: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms 8

Course Descriptions:

ANTH101: Physical Anthropology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This course will introduce you to several important areas within physical anthropology including the genetic basis of human evolution, how evolution works as a process, modern human variation, race, bioarchaeology and forensics, primate ecology and behavior, and the human fossil record. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

BIOL100: Biological Sciences (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The study of life from molecule to organism with focus on structure and function of cells, mechanisms of heredity and change, survey of animals and plants and their interrelationships in the living world. Open to non-majors as well as majors. BIOL 100 is not included in the GPA as a biology major course. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

BIOL107: Biology for Survival (3 hours lecture)

Basic concepts of biology that focus on social implications of pollution, population control, radiation, drugs, pesticides, the genetic revolution, etc. For non-science majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

BIOL109: The Living World (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This course will provide students an opportunity to learn about the biological and environmental components of life and how these components interact to affect their own lives. This course is designed to be effective for and approachable by students who are not biology majors. No prerequisites in biology are needed. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

BIOL110: The Biology of Human Life (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The course is intended to serve the non-biology major and present a basic introduction to human anatomy and physiology. It will provide students with a laboratory experience so that they may learn the scientific method and its application in the field of human biology. This course will provide these students with a body of knowledge specific to human anatomy and physiology so that they may be well informed when dealing with important personal, family and societal issues relative to health and life-style decisions. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

BIOL215: Human Heredity (3 hours lecture)

A non-major course introducing concepts of classical heredity and modern molecular genetics, which stresses the techniques and significance of genetic knowledge and research. 3 sh.

BIOL240: Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology I (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Human anatomy and physiology for health education and physical education majors. Not for biology majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

BIOL241: Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology II (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Human anatomy and physiology for health education and physical education majors. Not for biology majors. Biology majors may only take this course as a free elective. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 240.

BIOL243: Human Anatomy and Physiology (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

A study of the dynamics of the human body in relation to its structure and function is based on its nutritional input. Each organ system is discussed in relation to its contribution to the whole functioning organism, as well as a basic survey of its pathologies. Primarily for ADA certification. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: CHEM 130.

BIOL380: Genetics (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

Lecture and lab. Heredity, gene and chromosomal structure and function, gene regulation, mutation and repair, genes in populations, genetic manipulation, and applied genetics are covered. Lab exercises demonstrate genetic concepts. A semester-long project with research paper is required. Required of all biology majors and minors. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Biology, Molecular Biology and Science Informatics. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 230 with a grade of C- or higher and CHEM 120 with a grade of C- or higher.

CHEM100: Introductory Chemistry (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

An introductory lecture and laboratory course in modern chemistry for non-science majors intended to make chemistry understandable, accessible and applicable. Topics include atomic theory, stoichiometry, bonding, molecular shapes, acid-base theory, ploymers, medicine, and nutrition. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science, Laboratory or Non-Laboratory Science. 4 sh.

CMST101: Fundamentals of Speech: Communication Requirement (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical requirements of different types of public presentations and helps students develop an understanding and appreciation of the dynamic nature of the communication process. The course focuses on the basic elements of the communication process, listening, communicator and audience characteristics, basic research skills, and message composition and delivery. Students learn about the demands of public presentations in culturally and professionally diverse environments and develop presentation competence and flexibility. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Communication, Communication. Previous course SPCM 101 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

CSIT111: Fundamentals of Programming I (3 hours lecture)

Basic theory of digital computers. Syntax and semantics of a programming language. Algorithms: logic, design, testing and documentation. Previous course CMPT 183 effective through Spring 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 100. MATH 112 may be taken as a corequisite or prerequisite.

EAES101: Planet Earth (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

An introduction to the physical characteristics of planet earth. The focus is on processes and interactions of the four components of the earth system: atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. An understanding of the human impact on earth systems is also developed and maintained in perspective. Satellite information, aerial photography, maps, charts and other Geographic Information Systems technologies are used to study planet earth in this course. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. Previous course GEOS 107 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

EAES105: Physical Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Materials of the earth; landforms and structures; the processes and agents responsible for their formation and modification. Modern tectonic concepts. Topographic and geologic maps. Required field trips. Not open to students who have had Principles of Geology. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. Previous course GEOS 112 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

EAES107: Earth and the Environment (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

The study of the natural processes of the earth and the effects of human activities on the environment. Earth materials, processes and systems, and the engineering properties of natural materials will be discussed, as well as pollution of soil, water and air. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. Previous course GEOS 125 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

EAES201: Understanding Weather and Climate (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Presents a basic understanding of the dynamic atmosphere and explores the impacts that weather and climate have on humans and the biosphere. Basic physical laws of energy and motion are employed to explain temperature, precipitation, atmospheric circulation, storms, and how climates vary regionally. Connections are made toward management of weather hazards, air pollution, impacts on agriculture and economy, and environmental and social implications of climate change. Lectures are supplemented by current events discussions and hands-on exercises in lab sections. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. Previous course GEOS 257 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as prerequisite or corequisite.

EAES240: Historical Geology (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Geological history of the earth; the evolution of North America in terms of the changing geography, climate, and plant and animal life as interpreted from the rock and fossil record. Required field trips. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. Previous course GEOS 114 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: EAES 101, EAES 105, EAES 107 or EAES 250.

EAES250: Introduction to Marine Sciences (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

A general study of the marine sciences, including origin and evolution of the oceans, physical and chemical properties of seawater, marine life, oceanic circulation, atmospheric-ocean exchange and other processes that take place in the oceans. This course also deals with marine resources and human interaction with the marine environment. Field trips required. May be taught off-campus at the NJ Marine Sciences Consortium in the summer. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, PHMS 250. Previous course PHMS 210 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as a prerequisite or corequisite.

ECEL200: Perspectives on Early Childhood and Elementary Education in a Democracy (2 hours lecture, 1 hour other)

This course examines the education of children during their early and elementary school years from historical, political, social, and cultural perspectives. Students critically analyze issues influencing our current public education system to determine their impact on schools, teachers, children families, and society. They examine how our education systems reflect and respond to the changing needs, knowledge, and dispositions of our democratic society. Closed to Freshmen. 25 hours of field experience required. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100 or equivalent writing course from an accredited college/university. Not open to freshmen.

ECEL408: Social Studies and the Arts in Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture)

In this course, students consider the knowledge, skills, and perspectives necessary to help learners become active and informed citizens able to think critically about local, national, and global contexts in the 21st Century. Students are introduced to the four strands that frame social studies in New Jersey-(A) Civics, Government, and Human Rights; (B) Geography, People, and the Environment; (C) Economics, Innovation, and Technology; and (D) History, Culture, and Perspectives. Independently and in groups, students enter real and virtual spaces to plan, implement, and evaluate teaching and learning that draws upon technology. Students experiment with technology and the arts-dance, theater, music, and the visual arts-in their discovery of methods that position learners to understand the myths and truths of the past and present with the capacity to imagine future realities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

ECEL410: Clinical Experience I: Inclusive Elementary and Early Childhood Classrooms

This course introduces students to the dynamics of inclusive elementary and early childhood classrooms, schools, and communities. Through required fieldwork in elementary and early childhood settings, observations, interviews, and data collection, students discuss the role of the teacher(s), documentation and assessment techniques, variables of the classroom environment, school climate, and the wider community. Students implement lesson plans and use a range of observation and documentation strategies including running records, environmental rating scales, anecdotal records, checklists, rating scales, and examination of children's work. Students learn to link community resources to school and classroom needs, collect data to inform instructional practice and culturally responsive teaching and learning, and evaluate the progress and needs of children in inclusive elementary and early childhood settings. Fieldwork is required. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200 and READ 399.

ECEL412: Seminar I: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms (1 hour seminar)

Accompanies ECEL 410, Clinical Experience I: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms, and offers students a forum for discussion, reflection, and critical thinking with regard to clinical work in inclusive elementary classrooms. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200.

ECEL414: Clinical Experience II: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms

Students demonstrate their knowledge of child and early adolescent development and the significant role of families and communities with regard to children's learning by planning and implementing developmentally appropriate and culturally responsive curriculum in an inclusive elementary classroom. Focusing on the diverse needs of individual children, students develop, implement, and assess an integrated curriculum unit that incorporates the Core Curriculum Content Standards and emphasizes literacy across the curriculum. As reflective practitioners, students utilize multiple strategies to assess children's learning, classroom climate, and effective classroom management. Students are responsible for the full range of teacher activities in the classroom and are expected to seek out parents, administrators, and school colleagues as resources. Students are required to assemble an exhibition portfolio and participate in a mock interview in order to demonstrate their strengths as a teacher. 8 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 410.

ECEL418: Social and Cultural Context of Families and Communities (3 hours lecture)

This course provides students with an understanding of how social, cultural, economic, and environmental influences shape children's development and learning. Students explore the relationships and role expectations among teacher, family, child, and community as they affect learning. They also examine methods for developing school/family partnerships and how to use community resources to support families. Students learn to take into account issues of child diversity as they create learning experiences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing.

ECEL421: Seminar II: Inclusive Elementary Classrooms (1 hour seminar)

Provides students with a forum to discuss the role of the teacher as teacher candidates take on full-time classroom responsibilities. Discussions focus on identifying and involving oneself in the professional field of elementary and middle school education, upholding and advocating for ethical standards, engaging in continuous and collaborative learning, and taking a critical stance to inform practice. Teacher candidates demonstrate that they can make and justify decisions based on their knowledge of central issues such as developmentally appropriate practice, culturally responsive learning and teaching, and the context of children's lives. 1 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 412 or ECEL 413.

ECEL422: Integrating Elementary Curriculum and Assessment for Equity and Diversity (3 hours lecture)

In this course, students engage in reflective curriculum planning. They develop an integrated unit that incorporates state standards, differentiated instructional strategies, and appropriate adaptations for students with diverse learning styles and interests, students with disabilities, and English Language Learners. Students investigate and discuss issues related to their teaching and learning experiences focusing on inclusion practices, assessment, classroom management, and culturally responsive teaching. Students critically reflect on their teaching beliefs and explore teacher professionalism in the field of elementary education. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

ECEL427: Explorations: Science, Math, and Technology in the Elementary Classrooms (3 hours lecture)

Explores the nature of elementary science and math instruction, how to incorporate these disciplines in inclusive upper elementary/middle school classrooms . Hands-on/minds-on science and math activities and effective management techniques that engage children in the wonder and critical study of life, earth, physical (human-made), and space sciences will be examined. Stategies to adapt science and math learning to individual learners will be emphasized. Students will gain confidence and skills in the unifying concepts of science: systems, order, and organization; evidence, models and explanation; change, constancy, and measurement; evolution and equilibrium; and form and function. Mathematical concepts such as geometric thinking and spatial sense, chance and data analysis, number systems and number sense, patterns and algebraic thinking, and problem solving will also be explored. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200 and admission to Teacher Education Program.

EDFD220: Philosophical Orientation to Education (3 hours lecture)

Western philosophical heritage as related to the issues and responsibilities of American education. Comparative analysis of past and current ideological movements that influence moral, social, and educational decisions of parents, political leaders, and professional educators. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Humanities, Philosophy or Religion. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ENWR 105 or HONP 100.

FCST214: Child Development I (3 hours lecture)

This course takes a developmental approach to the study of young children from conception to age 10. For each developmental stage, students explore physical, socio-emotional, cognitive, and language domains. Developmental theories are woven into each part of the course and an emphasis is placed upon observational and research methodologies. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101.

FCST314: Child Development II: Adolescence (3 hours lecture)

In this course students utilize a developmental approach to study adolescents (11-18 years) focusing on physical, cognitive and social development throughout this age period. Students examine the impact of family, peers, race, ethnicity, socio-cultural, and environmental influences on adolescents. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FCST 214 and PSYC 101. Out-of-class interviews and/or observations are required.

HLTH101: Personal Health Issues (3 hours lecture)

Personal Health Issues examines health through six interrelated dimensions: physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, interpersonal and social, and environmental. This course examines how health choices impact society and the health of a community. Additionally, health policies and societal health issues are examined for their impact on the individual. This course emphasizes contemporary health issues using the national initiative Health People 2010 as a framework. Assessing health status, increasing health competencies to enhance decision-making skills, eliciting health-promoting behaviors, and interpreting existing and proposed social actions that ultimately affect individual, family, community and environmental health are central focuses of this course. 3 sh.

HLTH207: Safety, Accidents and Emergency Care. Starting Winter 2016: Injury Prevention and Emergency Care (3 hours lecture)

Provides for study of major safety areas including transportation, public safety, industrial and home safety. Emergency health care, first aid treatment, and preventive measures are considered in the context of individual, agency and institutional responsibilities. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 102.

HLTH210: Consumer Health (3 hours lecture)

Interpretation of individual economic activity as it relates to health service and health products. Includes analysis of factors influencing consumer health attitudes and behavior. 3 sh.

HLTH213: Perspectives on Drugs (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of licit as well as illicit drug use in contemporary society from the perspective of selected biomedical and psychosocial disciplines. Examines the effects of drugs on the individual and society in the context of changing social conditions and technological developments. Analyzes complex nature of the drug problem and rehabilitative and preventive measures and tentative solutions to this important aspect of human existence. 3 sh.

HLTH220: Mental Health (3 hours lecture)

Provides for the study of human emotional adjustment throughout the life cycle from biomedical and psychosocial perspectives. The factors that foster the development of emotional and mental well-being and the forces that contribute to the breakdown of human adjustment capabilities are identified and analyzed in light of research and clinical literature. Special attention is given to the strategies for the prevention of mental disorders and promotion of mental health. 3 sh.

HLTH290: Human Sexuality (3 hours lecture)

Students will explore many interacting cultural, personal and health factors relating to human sexual development, attitudes, and behaviors. Historical, anthropological, biological/physiological, socio-cultural and psychological factors will be introduced to encourage a broad perspective. Discussion of differing philosophical, ethical and moral positions will also aid students in making a critical assessment of intimate human relationships and acquaint them with criteria and processes for understanding themselves as sexual beings. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science, Social Science. 3 sh.

HLTH307: The Study of Human Diseases (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of diseases, their etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Includes a review of causation theories and incidence patterns and focuses on major degenerative, neoplastic, metabolic, immunologic, and infectious diseases. Attention is given to prevention and control measures with an emphasis on the role of selected health/medical resources in disease management. Offered as HLTH 307 through Fall 2015. To become HLTH 208 effective Winter 2016. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 105 or HPEM 150 or ATTR 201 and at least one 200-level course in HLTH, HPEM, or ATTR.

HLTH314: Public Health Aspects of Alcohol Abuse (3 hours lecture)

Examines the impact of alcohol abuse on public health. Society's attempts to diminish the impact are also explored. Includes study of effects of alcohol abuse on the family and workplace; prevention modalities and rehabilitation programs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 213 or HLTH 215.

HLTH330: Foundations of Health Education. Starting Winter 2016: Health Education Methods (3 hours lecture)

Provides a comprehensive study of the scientific, social, behavioral, educational, and legal foundations of health education. Traces the evolution and interprets the impact of related professions on school, community, and allied health education. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Health. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 204.

HLTH411: School Health and Community Services (3 hours lecture)

Provides for an in-depth understanding of the school health program and community services. Includes study of school and health services, healthful school environment, and health education and community health services. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education major or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 330.

HLTH430: Health Counseling. Starting Winter 2016: Counseling Skills for Public Health Professionals (3 hours lecture)

Course focuses on factors influencing health and illness behavior with implications for behavioral intervention in health care. Included are the intervention strategies of prevention, crisis intervention, postvention and compliance, and the intervention techniques of assessment, interviewing, counseling skills and small group dynamics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: HLTH 220 or HLTH 222 or departmental approval. Starting Winter 2016: HLTH 330.

HONP210: Honors Seminar in Science (3 hours seminar, 2 hours lab)

Interdisciplinary course in the natural and physical sciences consisting of seminars and laboratory experience. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: For Honors Program students only or by permission of instructor.

HONP211: Honors Seminar in Contemporary Issues in Science (3 hours seminar)

Interdisciplinary course in the natural and physical sciences applying the scientific method, scientific data analysis, reasoning and logic to selected contemporary issues. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: For Honors Program students only or by permission of instructor.

HPEM150: Principles and Practice of Emergency Care (3 hours lecture)

Provides for study of emergency care management. Provides knowledge and skills for teaching principles and practices of emergency care in a school or adult fitness setting. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Starting Winter 2016: Exercise Science (ESCI) or Physical Education w/ conc: Adult Fitness (PEAF) majors only or departmental approval.

MATH122: Calculus I (4 hours lecture)

Limits, continuity; derivative and differentiation; applications of the derivative, maxima, minima, and extreme considerations; antiderivatives; Riemann integral. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 111 or MATH 112 or placement through the Montclair State University Placement Test (MSUPT) or a satisfactory score on department's Calculus Readiness Test. (Students who did not satisfy the course prerequisite at MSU and students who received a grade of D-, D, or D+ in the prerequisite course taken at MSU are required to demonstrate competency on the department's Calculus Readiness Test.)

MATH221: Calculus II (4 hours lecture)

Riemann integral applications, transcendental functions, techniques of integration, improper integrals, L'Hospital's rule, infinite series. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 122 with grade of C- or better.

MATH222: Calculus III (4 hours lecture)

Vector algebra; partial differentiation, and extreme considerations; polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, multiple integration; introduction to line integrals. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 221 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH320: Transitions to Advanced Mathematics (3 hours lecture)

This course will help students explore mathematics and make conjectures using technology. Students will enhance their understanding of mathematical models and to develop communication skills through the use of written reports and oral presentations of projects. The course content introduces students to difference equations, elementary linear algebra and ordinary differential equations. Further, the course will develop proof-writing skills and introduce students to the explore-conjecture-proof strategy. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 221 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH323: Complex Variables (3 hours lecture)

This course is a study of the arithmetic and algebra of complex numbers, and an introduction to the differentiation and integration of complex functions. Topics include: rectangular and polar form of complex numbers, algebra of complex numbers, differentiation, Cauchy-Riemann equations, and contour integrals. Previous course MATH 423 effective through Spring 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 222 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH335: Linear Algebra (4 hours lecture)

The course content will cover the foundations of the algebra of vector spaces, matrix operations, matrix invertibility theorems, linear independence, span, basis, linear transformations, finite dimensional Hilbert Spaces, Gram-Schmidt process, projections, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and applications. The focus of the course will be to develop advanced mathematical skills in reading and understanding abstract mathematical definitions, constructing examples, and developing mathematical proofs. Meets the University Writing Requirement for majors in Mathematics. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 222 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH340: Probability (3 hours lecture)

Chance and variability, elements of combinatorics, Bayes' theorem, random variables, binomial, poisson and normal distributions, applications to statistics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 221 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH350: College Geometry (3 hours lecture)

The study of a wide range of advanced concepts in Euclidean geometry suitable for teaching foundations of axiomatic systems at the high school or middle school level. Topics involving triangle congruence, parallel line postulate, properties of polygons and circles, area, volume, Pythagorean Theorem, similarity, transformations and geometric constructions will be studied from an advanced, proof-based perspective. Basics of Non- Euclidian geometries will be introduced. Geometers' Sketchpad and other software will be utilized. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 320 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH360: Mathematical Modeling in Biology (3 hours lecture)

The course introduces students to the study of mathematical modeling in the biological and medical sciences. Continuous and discrete dynamical systems will be used to describe topics such as interacting and structured populations, biological control, population genetics and evolution, biological oscillators and switches, pattern formation, and the dynamics of infectious diseases. Each topic will be presented in its historical context, leading to questions of current research interest and providing a comprehensive overview of the field and a solid foundation for interdisciplinary research in the biological sciences. Emphasis is on applications and mathematical techniques for finding solutions. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 221 (or MATH 116 and BIOL 213 for Biology Majors).

MATH368: Fluid Mechanics (3 hours lecture)

Mechanics of continuous media, liquids and gases; stress, viscosity, Navier-Stokes and Euler Equations, exact solutions, potential flow, circulation and vorticity, dimensional analysis and asymptotic models, boundary layers, stability theory and applications to industrial environmental problems. Cross listed with PHYS 368. Previous course MATH 468 effective through Spring 2014. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 222 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH370: Mathematics for Teaching (3 hours lecture)

This course will focus on the Common Core State Standards Mathematics (CCSSM) aligned with the content areas of number and quantity, pre-algebra and algebra, and statistics and probability. These topics will be presented with the goal of fostering pre-service mathematics teachers' (PSMT's) understanding of and commitment to teaching mathematics that promotes student understanding. PSMTs will explore mathematical content deeply while also discussing related pedagogical tools, including teaching methods, curricula, lesson planning, technology resources, and assessment practices. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 350 with a grade of C- or better and admission into the Teacher Education program.

MATH398: Vector Calculus (3 hours lecture)

Topics include the algebra of the differential and integral calculus; gradients, divergence and curl of a vector field, and integral theorems together with applications drawn from the physical sciences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH420: Ordinary Differential Equations (4 hours lecture)

A course in the theory and applications of ordinary differential equations which emphasizes qualitative aspects of the subject. Topics include analytic and numerical solution techniques for linear and nonlinear systems, graphical analysis, existence-uniqueness theory, bifurcation analysis, and advanced topics. Prerequisite: MATH 335. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH421: Partial Differential Equations (3 hours lecture)

Partial differential equations arise in the mathematical modeling of many physical, chemical, and biological phenomena. They play a crucial role in diverse subject areas, such as fluid dynamics, electromagnetism, material science, astrophysics, financial modeling, and hydrogeology, for example. This course is an introduction to partial differential equations with emphasis on the wave, diffusion and Laplace equations. The focus will be on understanding the physical meaning and mathematical properties of solutions of partial differential equations. Methods of solutions include separation of variables using orthogonal series, transform methods, method of characteristics, and some numerical methods. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 420 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH425: Advanced Calculus I (3 hours lecture)

Properties of the real number system, limits, continuous functions, intermediate value theorem, derivative, mean value theorem, Riemann integral. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH426: Advanced Calculus II (3 hours lecture)

This course is a continuation of MATH 425. Topics include functions of several variables, partial derivatives, Green's theorem, Stoke's theorem, divergence theorem, implicit function theorem, inverse function theorem, infinite series and uniform convergence. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 425 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH431: Foundations of Modern Algebra (3 hours lecture)

Fundamental concepts of algebra including groups, rings, integral domains and fields, with important examples. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH433: Theory of Numbers (3 hours lecture)

This course presents the principal ideas of classical elementary number theory, emphasizing the historical development of these results and the important figures who worked on them. Topics studied include the following: divisibility, primes, and the Euclidean Algorithm; number-theoretic functions, linear congruencies, the Chinese Remainder Theorem, the Theorems of Fermat, Euler, and Wilson; quadratic congruencies and the Law of Quadratic Reciprocity; Diophantine equations and Fermat's Last Theorem; continued fractions; Pell's equation and the sum of two squares. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH450: Foundations of Geometry (3 hours lecture)

The course deals with the fundamental ideas common to Euclidean and Non-Euclidean geometries; projective, affine, and metric geometries. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH451: Topology (3 hours lecture)

Point set topology including topics such as, metric spaces, limit points, derived sets, closure, continuity, compact sets and connected sets. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 425 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH460: Introduction to Applied Mathematics (3 hours lecture)

This course is a survey of applied mathematical techniques, including such topics as control theory (feedback control systems, Nyquist and Popov plots, pole shifting, Laplace transforms) and classical boundary value problems (Sturm-Liouville equations with solution techniques involving Fourier series). Applications will use the theory of calculus of variations which includes the variational derivative, the general variation of a functional, variation in parametric form, and the invariance of the Euler's equations. Prerequisite: MATH 335. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 420 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH463: Numerical Analysis (3 hours lecture)

Finite differences, approximation theory, linear and non-linear equations, error analysis. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH464: Operations Research I (3 hours lecture)

Linear programming, transportation problem, assignment problem, duality, sensitivity analysis, network flows, dynamic programming, nonlinear programming, integer programming. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH465: Operations Research II (3 hours lecture)

Game theory, queuing models, inventory models, Markov processes, reliability theory and applications. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 and MATH 340 both with a grade of C- or better.

MATH466: Mathematics of Finance I (3 hours lecture)

Mathematical theory of interest rates, annuities, bond valuation, stock valuation, options, arbitrage, binomial trees, put-call parity, Black Scholes Model, Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) and portfolio selection. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: FINC 321 and MATH 340 both with a grade of C- or better.

MATH467: Mathematics of Finance II (3 hours lecture)

Mathematical theory of forward/futures contract, hedging with futures, fixed income market analysis, duration, immunization, financial swaps, interest swaps, currency swaps, future options, Black Scholes Model, put-call parity, binomial trees, other options, and volatility. This course can be used as part of preparation for SOA/CASACT Actuarial Examinations, Course 2. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 466 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH469: Mathematical Modeling (3 hours lecture)

The art of constructing mathematical models for "real world" problems, solving the model, and testing the accuracy of the model. Problems will be selected from business, science, computer science, and the social sciences. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 420 and MATH 340; and MATH 464 or STAT 330 all with a grade of C- or better.

MATH471: Selected Topics in Modern Mathematics (3 hours lecture)

Professionalized view of junior and senior high school mathematics topics: functions, real and complex numbers, analytic geometry, absolute value and inequalities, sets and logic, flow charting, linear programming. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 with a grade of C- or better and admission into the Teacher Education Program.

MATH475: History of Mathematics (3 hours lecture)

This course surveys the origins and evolution of mathematical ideas from the antiquity to the present. Emphasis will be on the role of mathematics as an integral part of our cultural heritage and its relationship to areas such as science, art, religion, philosophy and literature. Classical mathematical methods will be examined by reading selected original works by great mathematicians. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH485: Applied Combinatorics and Graph Theory (3 hours lecture)

Problem solving by counting, enumeration, and graph theory. Permutation, combinations, binomial coefficients, generating functions, and recurrence relations, partitions, inclusion-exclusion, Polya's formula, graph theoretic models, trees, circuits, networks, matching, and their applications to puzzles, games, tournaments, traffic patterns, transportation. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 340 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH487: Introduction to Mathematical Cryptography (3 hours lecture)

A modern introduction to the application of number theory, combinatorics and abstract algebra to cryptography. Specifically, this includes modular arithmetic, generating polynomials and matrix algebra over rings and fields. A discussion of a broad range of applications of mathematics to the security of credit cards, cell phones and codes among numerous other current examples will be covered. Current industry protocols will be explored. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 with a grade of C- or better.

MATH490: Honors Seminar (3 hours seminar)

This course will concentrate on subject matter not usually covered within standard mathematics courses. A written and oral report are required. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 with a grade of C- or better; and departmental approval.

MATH491: Research in Mathematics Education (3 hours seminar)

Research in Mathematics Education Research in an area of mathematics education agreed upon by the student and the instructor. The results of the research will be the basis of a seminar, colloquium, or conference presentation to be given by the student. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits with either a new research topic or continued research on the current topic. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 350 and departmental approval.

MATH495: Topics for Undergraduates (1 hour lecture)

Study of advanced topics in undergraduate mathematics. May be repeated for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 and MATH 340 both with a grade of C- or better; and departmental approval.

MATH497: Mathematics Research I

Individual research in a mathematical area agreed upon by the student and the instructor. The results of the research will be a basis of a seminar or colloquium to be given by the student. Students must not accumulate more than 6 credits total in courses MATH 497, 498. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 with a grade of C- or better; and departmental approval.

MATH498: Mathematics Research II

Individual research in a mathematical area agreed upon by the student and the instructor. The results of the research will be a basis of a seminar or colloquium to be given by the student. Students must not accumulate more than 6 credits total in courses MATH 497, 498. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 335 with a grade of C- or better; and departmental approval.

MTHM201: Mathematics in Elementary Schools I (3 hours lecture)

This course is intended for undergraduate students seeking certification to teach early childhood and elementary school (P-3, K-6). The course will provide prospective early childhood and elementary school teachers with opportunities to develop deep, connected understandings of (1) content included in the Operations & Algebraic Thinking and Number & Operations strands of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM), as well as (2) factors that influence student learning of that content, (3) characteristics of instruction that are effective in promoting development of student understanding of the concepts from operations and algebraic thinking and number and operations included in the Pre-K through grade 6 mathematics curriculum, and (4) research on student learning of Pre-K through grade 6 operations and algebraic thinking and number and operations. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200.

MTHM302: Mathematics in Elementary Schools II (3 hours lecture)

The course is intended for undergraduate students seeking certification to teach early childhood and elementary school (P-3, K-6). The course will provide prospective early childhood and elementary school teachers with opportunities to develop deep, connected understandings of (1) content included in the Geometry, Measurement & Data, and Fraction Operations strands of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM), as well as (2) factors that influence Pre-K through grade 6 student learning of that content, (3) characteristics of classroom instruction that are effective in promoting development of student understanding of elementary geometry, measurement and data, and fraction operations, and (4) research on student learning of elementary school geometry, measurement and data, and fraction operations. Previous course MTHM 202 effective through Spring 2011. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: ECEL 200 and MTHM 201.

NUFD182: Nutrition (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed to give students a general knowledge of the components of the food we eat, the nutrients necessary for a healthy life, the functions of nutrients and the interrelationships and metabolism of nutrients. The factors which influence the recommended dietary intake of nutrients, and theories and guidelines for screening nutrition risk and disease and prevention are presented. 3 sh.

PHMS250: Introduction to Marine Sciences (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

A general study of the marine sciences, including origin and evolution of the oceans, physical and chemical properties of seawater, marine life, oceanic circulation, atmospheric-ocean exchange and other processes that take place in the oceans. This course also deals with marine resources and human interaction with the marine environment. Field trips required. May be taught off-campus at the NJ Marine Sciences Consortium in the summer. Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Natural/Physical Science Laboratory. Cross listed with Earth and Environmental Studies, EAES 250. Previous course PHMS 210 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: GNED 199, ENWR 105 or HONP 100 may be taken as a prerequisite or corequisite.

PHYS191: University Physics I (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

This one-semester calculus-based course including laboratory is a study of the principles of physics and some applications to society's problems. Topics covered include mechanics, thermodynamics, fluids, and harmonic motion. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 122 is prerequisite or co-requisite.

PSYC101: Introduction to Psychology (3 hours lecture)

This course is an introduction to the study of human behavior and surveys major topics within the diverse discipline of psychology. Topics covered will come from each of four core areas offered by the psychology department: Social/Applied (e.g., Social, Industrial-Organizational, Health), Biological Basis of Behavior (e.g., Physiology, Perception, Motivation/Emotion, Comparative Animal Behavior), Cognition (e.g., Learning and Memory, Conditioning and Learning, Cognition, Language) and Personality (e.g., Personality, Abnormal, Development). Meets Gen Ed 2002 - Social Science for non-psychology majors only. 3 sh.

READ399: Early Literacy Development and Instruction (3 hours lecture)

This course introduces future teachers to language and literacy development and instruction in preschool through 3rd grade classrooms. Students learn the components and stages of literacy development from emergent literacy through reading fluency, and examine the cognitive, linguistic, sociocultural and instructional influences on this process. Students carry out an assessment of a child's reading and build a repertoire of culturally responsive teaching practices that address the five essential components of reading instruction identified by the National Reading Panel (2000) (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension). They practice standards-based lesson planning and design instructional adaptations for English Language Learners. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Program.

READ408: Literacy in the Elementary Grades (3 hours lecture)

In this course, prospective elementary teachers continue their exploration of key theories and methods for teaching literacy, with an emphasis on the intermediate grades. They focus on reading comprehension, vocabulary development, writing instruction, literacy across the content areas, and the use of technology to develop a breadth of pedagogical knowledge. Particular attention is given to developing expertise in differentiated instructional planning that meets a diverse range of learners, including English Language Learners, students with learning disabilities, struggling readers, and advanced students. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: READ 399.

STAT330: Fundamentals of Modern Statistics I (3 hours lecture)

Displaying, describing and modeling data; arrangements for producing data; probability; methods for drawing conclusions from data: significance testing, confidence interval estimation, linear regression, analysis of variance. Examples from many disciplines including the social and natural sciences. Statistical software is used. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 221 with a grade of C- or better.

STAT401: Applied Statistics for the Sciences (3 hours lecture)

Organizing, displaying, and describing data; designing experiments; methods for drawing conclusions from data; significance testing, confidence intervals, linear regression, analysis of variance, chi-square tests of independence. Examples from disciplines in the natural and physical sciences. Statistical software is used. Not for Mathematics and Computer Science majors. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 111 or Math 112.

STAT403: Techniques and Applications of Statistics (3 hours lecture)

Statistical techniques for the social and behavioral sciences including estimation, tests of hypothesis, non-parametric statistics, regression and correlation. May not be taken for credit by mathematic majors. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 112.

STAT441: Statistical Computing (3 hours lecture)

This course is designed: (1) to acquaint students with the use of the computer in solving statistical problems, and (2) to develop intermediate level statistical methodology. Several statistical computing packages and the student's own programs will be utilized. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: STAT 330 or STAT 401 with a grade of C- or better.

STAT442: Fundamentals of Modern Statistics II (3 hours lecture)

Continuation of STAT 440. Principles of statistical inference, categorical data analysis, one and two-way anova, multiple linear regression, nonparametric methods, bootstrap methods. Examples from a wide variety of disciplines. Statistical software is used. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: STAT 330 with a grade of C- or better or STAT 401 with a grade of C- or better.

STAT443: Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (3 hours lecture)

Develops statistical methods from probability theory. Topics discrete and continuous probability distributions, estimation, inference and hypothesis testing. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 340 with a grade of C- or better; and STAT 330 or STAT 401 with a grade of C- or better.

STAT481: Introduction to Statistical Data Mining (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to the concepts and applications of a variety of data-mining methods. Data mining is the process of selecting, exploring, and modeling large amounts of data to uncover previously unknown patterns in the data. Statistical techniques covered include classification and regression trees, predictive modeling, and unsupervised learning. Hands-on applications to data sets from diverse fields. Statistical software is used. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: STAT 442 with a grade of C- or better.

STAT487: Statistical Genomics (3 hours lecture)

Analysis of discrete data illustrated with genetic data on morphological characters, allozymes, restriction fragment length polymorphisms and DNA sequences. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian estimation including iterative procedures. Numerical resampling and bootstrapping. Development of statistical techniques for characterizing genetic disequilibrium and diversity. Locating genes with markers. Cross listed with Biology and Molecular Biology BIOL 487. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 380 and STAT 330 or STAT 401, or equivalent.

STAT495: Topics in Statistical Science

Guided study of selected topics in statistical science such as exploratory data analysis, applied multivariate methods, statistical quality control, design of experiment. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: STAT 330 with a grade of C- or better or STAT 401 with a grade of C- or better.

STAT497: Undergraduate Research in Statistical Science

Individual research in an area of statistical science agreed upon by the student and instructor. The results of the research will be the basis of a seminar or colloquium to be given by the student. May be repeated five times for a total of six credits. Students must not accumulate more than six credits total in courses MATH 497, MATH 498, STAT 495, STAT 497. 1 - 3 sh.

Prerequisites: STAT 442 with a grade of C- or better and departmental approval.