Mathematical and Computational Modeling (M.S.) - Graduate - 2015 University Catalog

The Professional Science Master’s degree is a two-year graduate degree designed to fill a management need for technology-based companies, governmental agencies, and non-profit organizations. Students pursue advanced training in science, while simultaneously developing valued business skills. Professional Science Master’s programs combine rigorous study in science or mathematics with coursework in management, policy, or law. All PSM programs emphasize writing and communication skills, and many include project management. Most PSM programs require a final project or team experience, as well as an internship in a business or public sector enterprise.

Developed in concert with industry, PSM programs are designed to dovetail into present and future professional career opportunities. Graduates are equipped to manage the breakthroughs that are created by research teams. They can interact comfortably and intelligently with scientific researchers and business managers, especially in the marketing, finance, and legal departments. The PSM got its start in 1997 as a way to better and more rapidly equip students with much-needed skills in the STEM fields. Currently, there are over 300 PSM programs offered by 150 institutions.

The PSM-MCM will enable the student to acquire advanced training in understanding, analyzing, and solving mathematical models. In addition to content courses on Scientific Computing, Data Analysis, Mathematical Models, and Optimization, the PSM student will be required to take courses on Project Management, Communication, Data Structures, and Marketing to help them transition into “extrovert math professionals” who will successfully interface between research teams and decision makers in technology based companies, government agencies, and non-profit organizations. Additionally, the PSM student will be required to learn how to successfully incorporate mathematical models in time bound interdisciplinary projects with specific objectives. To achieve this goal, the student will be exposed to a range of mini-projects dealing with applications of mathematical models to real-world problems. Each mini-project will require students to work in self-directed collaborative teams with faculty and external guidance to understand the problem, create a (or modify an existing) mathematical model for the problem, perform some preliminary analysis of the problem, and formulate a possible project for the culminating experience. The final component of the PSM-MCM will require each student to complete a comprehensive culminating experience/internship. The culminating experience/internship will require each individual student to conceive, analyze, report in writing, and make a public oral presentation on a detailed modeling project.

Computational Modeling degree requirements & course descriptions


MATHEMATICAL AND COMPUTATIONAL MODELING

Complete 33 semester hours including the following 4 requirement(s):

  1. REQUIRED COURSES

    Complete 5 courses for 18 semester hours:

    MATH 585 Fundamentals of Scientific Computing (3 hours lecture) 3
    MATH 586 Fundamentals of Mathematical Models (3 hours lecture) 3
    MATH 587 Fundamentals of Optimization (3 hours lecture) 3
    MATH 588 Professional Science Master Mini-Projects (6 hours lecture) 6
    STAT 583 Fundamentals of Data Analysis (3 hours lecture) 3
  2. PLUS COURSES

    Complete the following 3 courses for 6 semester hours:

    CMST 582 Techniques of Communication (3 hours lecture) 3
    MGMT 565 Project Management (1.5 hours lecture) 1.5
    MKTG 531 Contemporary Marketing (1.5 hours lecture) 1.5
  3. ELECTIVES

    Complete a total of 3 semester hours from the following (some courses are 1.5 semster hours and others are 3 semester hours):

    ACCT 530 Financial Accounting (3 hours lecture) 3
    BIOL 515 Population Genetics (3 hours lecture) 3
    BIOL 550 Topics in Microbiology (3 hours lecture) 3
    BIOL 572 Wetland Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab) 4
    BIOL 573 Shoreline Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab) 4
    BIOL 574 Behavioral Ecology (3 hours lecture) 3
    CHEM 538 Drug Design in Medicinal Chemistry (3 hours lecture) 3
    EAES 505 Environmental Geoscience (3 hours lecture) 3
    EAES 509 Current Issues in Sustainability Science (3 hours lecture) 3
    EAES 510 Geographic Information Systems (3 hours lecture) 3
    EAES 511 Fundamentals of Remote Sensing of the Environment (3 hours lecture) 3
    EAES 531 Hydroclimatology (3 hours lecture) 3
    EAES 532 Applied Groundwater Modeling (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) 4
    EAES 535 Geophysics (3 hours lecture) 3
    ECON 530 Microeconomics for Managers (1.5 hours lecture) 1.5
    ECON 531 Macroeconomics for Managers (1.5 hours lecture) 1.5
    FINC 530 Managerial Finance (3 hours lecture) 3
    HLTH 502 Determinants of Environmental Health (3 hours lecture) 3
    HLTH 565 Foundations of Epidemiology (3 hours lecture) 3
    INBS 561 Emerging Trends in Global Markets (1.5 hours lecture) 1.5
    MGMT 562 Organizational Behavior (1.5 hours lecture) 1.5
    SOCI 581 Sociological Perspectives on Health and Medicine (3 hours lecture) 3
  4. CULMINATING EXPERIENCE

    Complete for 6 semester hours.

    MATH 697 Culminating Experience for PSM (6 hours lecture) 6

Course Descriptions:

ACCT530: Financial Accounting (3 hours lecture)

This course is a study of basic accounting concepts and their significance to the financial analyst and manager. Problems relating to income determination, valuation, reporting and analysis are stressed. Alternative conceptual foundations of reporting standards are presented and information evaluated. Previous course ACCT 501 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

BIOL515: Population Genetics (3 hours lecture)

Detailed survey of the theory and application of the genetics of popoulations. Topics to be covered include Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium and Evolution, Natural and Artificial Selection, Migration, Mutation, Bottlenecks, Random Genetic Drift, and Genetic Variation. Students will learn population genetic principles and the mathematical theory behind those principles. Students will be required to write a literature paper on a topic of their choice related to Population Genetics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: BIOL 547 or permission of instructor.

BIOL550: Topics in Microbiology (3 hours lecture)

Coverage of selected topics such as the microbial genetics, antibiotic action, bacteriophage, virus, cancer and microbial metabolism. Emphasis will be placed on practical applications of modern research in specific areas. May be repeated once for a maximum of 6.0 credits as long as the topic is different. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Microbiology.

BIOL572: Wetland Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)

Important biotic, chemical and physical parameters of New Jersey's estuaries. Evolution and successional trends of estuarine communities. Ecology of individual communities studied by field trips to Delaware Bay shore and to some Atlantic coast bays, marshes and offshore barrier islands. Also offered at the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany, and zoology, and field biology.

BIOL573: Shoreline Ecology (2 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)

Community structure, trophic dynamics, species diversity and distribution of bottom dwelling organisms in relationship to their environment; lectures, laboratory work and field investigations of the marine benthos. Also offered at NJ Marine Sciences Consortium. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Botany, and zoology, and field biology.

BIOL574: Behavioral Ecology (3 hours lecture)

This seminar course explains the ecological consequences of animal behavior, viewed within the context of how behavior evolves and how populations adapt to their environments. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Field biology and zoology.

CHEM538: Drug Design in Medicinal Chemistry (3 hours lecture)

A comprehensive course covering the design and action of pharmaceutical agents. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation into the graduate program or permission of instructor.

CMST582: Techniques of Communication (3 hours lecture)

Techniques and ethics in the production of informative and persuasive messages for public consumption. Open to all graduate students. Course may be repeated once for a total of 6 semester hours. Previous course SPCM 582 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

EAES505: Environmental Geoscience (3 hours lecture)

In-depth study of the relationships between man and the physical environment of atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere. Particular attention to problems of mineral resource and fossil-fuel depletion; pollution of air, water and soils and waste disposal and recycling, simple computer modeling of environmental situations. Previous course GEOS 525 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a CSAM graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES509: Current Issues in Sustainability Science (3 hours lecture)

Overview of current issues in sustainability science and the challenges confronting society's transition to global sustainability: sustainable use of natural resources; social learning; engaging scientists at the science-policy interface; and the application of systems science to better predict the consequences of human actions and forecast outcomes of the multiple interacting stresses on the life support systems around us. Previous course ENVR 533 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a graduate program or departmental approval.

EAES510: Geographic Information Systems (3 hours lecture)

Provides graduate students who have finished any introductory GIS courses or equivalents an opportunity to advance both the practical skills and theoretical understanding of GIS. The course will focus on application of GIS to urban planning, locational analysis, public health, crime analysis, resource and land use management, transportation planning, environmental management etc. In the meantime, specific topics such as geovisualization, geographic database design, GIS modeling and management will be treated as an integrated part during the applications. Previous course EUGS 570 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an Earth and Environmental Studies (EAES) graduate program and equivalent of EAES 210 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES 310.

EAES511: Fundamentals of Remote Sensing of the Environment (3 hours lecture)

This course affords graduate students who have completed introductory courses or equivalents the opportunity to advance both practical skills in and theoretical understanding of remote sensing. The course covers a wide range of applications and promotes facility in image processing and visualization, integration with Geographic Information Systems, and spatial modeling techniques. Industry-standard software is used for demonstration and laboratory exercises. A semester project must be completed that demonstrates an application of remote sensing to a real-world environmental problem. Students are required to submit a term paper, an oral presentation, and a poster related to this project. Previous courses ENVR 555 and GEOS 555 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in an Earth and Environmental Studies (EAES) graduate program and equivalent of EAES210 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES311.

EAES531: Hydroclimatology (3 hours lecture)

Climatology emphasizing moisture as one of the fundamental factors in climatic analysis: processes and problems of classification and variability. Examines energy and water balance. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a EAES graduate program and equivalent of EAES201, EAES230, or EAES301 or departmental approval. Not open to students who have taken EAES332.

EAES532: Applied Groundwater Modeling (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

Introduction to groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling, using a variety of current software packages. Saturated and unsaturated media will be considered. Emphasis is on application of models to the solution of common problems encountered in hydrology industry and research. Previous course GEOS 552 effective through Spring 2012. 4 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in a College of Science and Mathematics (CSAM) graduate program and equivalent of EAES 331; and MATH 116 or MATH 122 or departmental approval.

EAES535: Geophysics (3 hours lecture)

Theory and application of conventional geophysical methods: seismology, magnetism, electricity and gravity. Laboratory includes the collection and interpretation of geophysical data. Field trips. Previous course GEOS 571 effective through Spring 2012. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Matriculation in MS Geoscience program.

ECON530: Microeconomics for Managers (1.5 hours lecture)

This course is an introduction to the principles of microeconomics. Topics include: economics of scarcity and choice, marginal analysis and economic efficiency, elasticity of demand and supply, utility maximization and firm's profit maximization under various market structures. Using these tools will allow students to understand and critically evaluate real world circumstances and events. 1.5 sh.

ECON531: Macroeconomics for Managers (1.5 hours lecture)

This course is an introduction to the principles of macroeconomics and provides students with a thorough understanding of macroeconomic issues and problems. Topics include: unemployment, inflation, national income accounting, fiscal and monetary policies. Students will be exposed to modern macroeconomic models and be able to apply these to explain economic fluctuations and the impact of fiscal and monetary policies on the economy. 1.5 sh.

FINC530: Managerial Finance (3 hours lecture)

This is an introductory course to provide students with a set of fundamental skills in managerial finance. Students will be exposed to basic accounting issues including a discussion of cash flows and tools to analyze financial statements. They will learn the time-value-of-money and employ these computational techniques to value bonds and stocks. Once these essential concepts are mastered, students will learn the basics of both how and why corporations make specific capital budgeting and working capital decisions. They will also understand how the essential elements of the risk-return trade-off and portfolio theory. 3 sh.

HLTH502: Determinants of Environmental Health (3 hours lecture)

Advanced study of health and safety aspects of the environment: air, water, industrial pollution and the impact of expanding population on health problems. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Health Education (HLED) MA & CER, Public Health w/conc: Community Health Education (PUBC) MPH, and Environmental Studies w/ conc: Environmental Science (ESES) MA majors only or departmental approval.

HLTH565: Foundations of Epidemiology (3 hours lecture)

Provides an understanding of the epidemiologic method of identifying disease-causing agents. Emphasizes the generation of hypotheses based on descriptive epidemiologic data, the testing of hypotheses by analytical epidemiologic research design, the determination of causality and value of epidemiologic research in developing disease prevention programs. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: Restricted to Public Health w/conc in Community Health Education (PUBC) MPH, Health Education (HLPE) MA & CER and Nutrition and Food Science (NUFS) MS majors only.

INBS561: Emerging Trends in Global Markets (1.5 hours lecture)

This course introduces students to a dynamic global environment wherein managers will be responsible for effective strategic, organizational, and human capital management. Focus will be given to the contemporary trends including the expanding European Union, the increasing trade among the Americas, and the rapidly growing economies in Asia that present the managers with challenging strategic decisions in an increasingly integrated world. In addition, the growing competitive influence of technology will be discussed throughout the course. Concerns about corporate social responsibility will also receive due attention. 1.5 sh.

Prerequisites: FINC 560.

MATH585: Fundamentals of Scientific Computing (3 hours lecture)

Theory and implementation of mathematical computing techniques. This course will present basic programming and graphing techniques to analyze mathematical models. Students will learn basic algorithm design, programming paradigms, simulation techniques, visualization software, and typesetting software for science and mathematics. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 420 and permission of the Graduate Program Coordinator.

MATH586: Fundamentals of Mathematical Models (3 hours lecture)

The course investigates meaningful and practical problems across various industry related disciplines including mathematical sciences, engineering, economics, operation research and life sciences. Students will learn how to identify problems, construct or select developed models, collect and analyze data, and draw appropriate conclusions. The development of appropriate mathematical models used to study applied case problems originating from industry interest will be stressed as well as interpretation of mathematical results in that context. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 585 and STAT 583 and permission of graduate program coordinator.

MATH587: Fundamentals of Optimization (3 hours lecture)

Introduction to applied optimization in various settings, both continuous and discrete. Topics selected from linear programming, non-linear programming, network optimization models, and feedback control with an emphasis on applications to business management, economics, game theory, and finance. The course will be team-taught, with the various areas of optimization introduced by faculty with expertise in that field. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 585 and STAT 583 and permission of Graduate Coodinator.

MATH588: Professional Science Master Mini-Projects (6 hours lecture)

Students working in teams will be assigned problems selected from professional case studies and may include problems of current interest supplied by collaborating industries and/or advisory board members. Solution methodology will vary from problem to problem and will require the wide breadth of mathematical tools covered in the prerequisite courses. These include discrete and continuous modeling, optimization methods, and data analysis. Central to the professional experience, students will present problem statement, solution methodology, and results during class time. Emphasis will be placed on incorporating the skills developed in the PSM plus courses. Specifically, these skills involve understanding goals, leadership and teamwork, communication skills, marketing the project, discipline, flexibility, innovation, special appropriate technologies, quality of project outcomes, ethics (as applicable), and meeting potential employer expectations. 6 sh.

Prerequisites: MATH 585, MATH 586, MATH 587, STAT 583 and permission of the Graduate Program Coordinator.

MATH697: Culminating Experience for PSM (6 hours lecture)

Students will work in teams to solve problems originating in the industry or to deliver industry related case studies. Each group will produce a written report of their work and give a PowerPoint presentation summarizing their report. Projects will require background knowledge in the PSM mathematical and technical core content and the communication/business plus course training. Each project will be mentored by a PSM faculty or advisory board member. 6 sh.

Prerequisites: Completion of 27 credits including MATH 585 and MATH 586 and MATH 587 and MATH 588 and STAT 583 and permission of the Graduate Program Coordinator.

MGMT562: Organizational Behavior (1.5 hours lecture)

This course provides students an understanding of behavior in organizations within a management context. This course examines organizational systems and structure, leadership, power and influence, teambuilding, organizational conflict, systems of communication, motivation, interpersonal dynamics and values, and organizational change and renewal. This course explores the role of new forces in the organizational environment such as workplace diversity and economic globalization. 1.5 sh.

MGMT565: Project Management (1.5 hours lecture)

This is an introductory course to project management with a focus on providing students with real world knowledge of managing projects in today's competitive environment. Throughout this course, we will introduce project examples from a wide variety of industries and functions including information technology, marketing, organization capability enhancement, training, etc. As a hybrid course, class will meet four times in person and the remaining periods online. 1.5 sh.

MKTG531: Contemporary Marketing (1.5 hours lecture)

This course is designed to provide a broad overview of marketing, including the concepts, terminology and theories that define the field. Students develop their knowledge of segmentation, targeting, and brand positioning. They review strategies for the development of products and services, and become familiar with pricing, distribution, and promotional strategies. 1.5 sh.

SOCI581: Sociological Perspectives on Health and Medicine (3 hours lecture)

This course will introduce the student to the interesting and complex relationships that exist between society, health and health care. Class lecture discussions will focus on the connections between social structure, the quality of the physical and social environment and health. Special attention will be given to work environments. This course will also deal with the effects of social factors on the experience of one's body, the perception of disease and on the construction of medical knowledge. 3 sh.

STAT583: Fundamentals of Data Analysis (3 hours lecture)

Theory and application of statistical methods for data analysis in professional industrial areas such as business, manufacturing, biomedical and marketing. Exploratory data analysis; principles of statistical inference; design and analysis of observational studies and experiments; linear regression. Additional topics based on real examples from other disciplines would include biostatistical methods, multivariate analysis, time series analysis, and data mining. Statistical software is used. 3 sh.

Prerequisites: STAT 330 and permission of the Graduate Program Coordinator.