The Learning Policy Institute (LPI) Features the Newark Montclair Urban Teacher Residency (NMUTR)


On September 19th, former Newark Montclair Urban Teacher (NMUTR) Resident Antonio Iglesias represented the MSU's NMUTR at a special Summit sponsored by the Learning Policy Institute (LPI) in Washington, D.C. Iglesias, one of our 6th year NMUTR graduates, was asked to share his experiences with high-quality preparation and how that has equipped him to be a successful teacher in Newark Public Schools. Here’s what he had to say about his experience at this event:

"'You can’t just fill up a bucket by opening the faucet more; you must see what’s leaking out the bottom.' This analogy shared by fellow panelist Steven Staples, Superintendent of Public Instruction for the state of Virginia, during my visit to the Learning Policy Institute’s (LPI) Forum on Teacher Turnover struck a chord with me.

Obviously, the challenge we face in addressing teacher turnover is complex, but hearing from my varied group of other panelists (ranging from high school students to board of education members to state senator), it became clear some of the challenges come from a lack of communication between all the stakeholders. In the same way I was taken aback and intrigued by what many of the policymakers shared, they in turn shared their shock and awe of many the experiences that we, those on the panel in the schools, shared (especially since many admitted that they rarely get to hear from students and teachers and, honestly, the very same is true vice versa). So when I spoke about my experiences of being a resident in the NMUTR, it felt empowering that I could help enrich the research that the LPI had shared about residency models. That, yes, we are helping address teacher turnover. That, yes, we are using a model that adequately prepares and supports new teachers. And that, yes, we are developing sustainable critical masses that help keep our teachers in our school."

The NMUTR is also represented throughout a report on teacher residencies recently published by LPI. They found that teachers who are well-prepared stay in classrooms at much higher rates than those who do not. The report can be accessed via this link: