Past Events

Past Events Offered by Office for Faculty Advancement

Active Learning Strategies: Integrating “Visible Thinking Routines” into Lectures and Discussions

presented by Helenrose Fives (P.h.D., University of Maryland, College Park) is a professor of educational psychology and teacher education

Description: In this workshop, Professor Helenrose Fives from the Department of Educational Foundations drew on her extensive experience teaching mid-sized undergraduate general education classes in Educational Psychology as well as her work preparing and preparing teachers to demonstrate how to use “Visible Thinking Routines” (Ritchart, Church, & Morrison, 2011), to engage students in active learning. Visible Thinking Routines are   classroom activities designed to make students’ thinking “visible” so that deeper understanding of content can be achieved. These routines can be readily adapted to any discipline to help students advance their conceptual, active thinking. As with other active learning workshops, Professor Fives’ strategies are aimed to combat the challenge of large classes of students whose preparation and individual abilities to pay attention and be actively engaged vary widely. Participants left  with concrete strategies as well as access to a broad and deep well of methods to experiment with in the future.

Quantitative Literacy for Faculty

presented by Eileen Murray, Mathematics

Description: Current trends in education demonstrate the steadily growing importance of Quantitative Literacy (QL). In this workshop, participants talked about what QL is, how you can identify it within your discipline, and how you can help your students develop high level quantitative skills for future coursework and employment.

Challenge Worksheets for Problem Solving and Active Learning in Large Classes

by Dr. Reba Wissner, music faculty member at Montclair State University, New York University, Westminster Choir College of Rider University, Ramapo College of New Jersey, and Seton Hall University.

Event description: Active student participation is often a challenge for teachers of large classes. This workshop will show faculty how what I call challenge worksheets (sample attached) can be used for team-based learning activities in large classes, allowing students to actively think about a problem at hand, analyze it, and solve it in a team. The advantage to these challenge worksheets is that they can be completed in 10-15 minutes, plus additional discussion and can be tailored to any discipline and any level. They can be used on their own or with an accompanying document or primary source such as a painting, piece of music, or poem. Further, they can be collected by the instructor to assess general group knowledge after a lesson without having to grade individual papers. After providing brief background information and an explanation, this workshop will be in two parts: first, allowing faculty to participate in a sample team challenge using a worksheet and second, having faculty design one such worksheet for their courses.

What Research Tells Us About Effective Teaching (and Learning) Strategies That We (and Our Students) Will Actually Use.

Part ofthe Provost’s Series on University Learning featuring Guest Speaker Dr. David McConnell, Professor, Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State University.

Discipline-based education research in a variety of STEM fields has identified empirically validated instructional practices that contribute to improvements in student learning and a reduction in attrition. We will discuss what observations of more than 200 instructors tells us about the use of these practices in geoscience classrooms. We will review the characteristics of nearly a dozen common practices and weigh the evidence that these strategies consistently result in improvements in student learning. Finally, we will make the case that we should consider what research in educational psychology tells us about student learning processes to design an adaptable teaching approach that blends a mix of in-class and out-of-class activities.”

This special guest presentation is made possible by a National Science Foundation grant #1611989, and sponsored by the STEM Pioneers Program. 

Contemplative Pedagogy in Teaching Practice

facilitated by Dr. Maughn Gregory, Professor, Educational Foundations.

Contemplative Pedagogy derives from Greek and Roman philosophical schools, Asian wisdom traditions, monotheist monastic traditions and religious communities, and American transcendentalism. Contemplative practices from these traditions are studied today by psychologists and neuroscientists who confirm their benefits for physical and mental wellbeing. As an educational movement, Contemplative Pedagogy seeks to introduce a variety of these practices in classrooms and other educational settings, in order to realize a number of interrelated aims, including: to help teachers and students cultivate non-judgmental curiosity and receptivity to unfamiliar subjects and to our own struggles and mistakes; to help us cultivate the ability to sustain non-distracted focus; to teach us how to rest discursive thinking and practice the kind of stillness from which alternative insights may arise; to invite us to bring personal experience, imagination and insight to bear on our work; to make schools and classrooms places of peace, non-anxiety, authenticity and compassion; to engage us in avocational and existential inquiry into the meaning and purpose of the lives we are leading and of the futures toward which we are hurtling; to encourage us to take care of ourselves physically, emotionally and morally throughout the (school) day; and to provide us with methods of inner work for emotional, psychological and moral transformation. In this workshop, we will discuss the relevance of these aims for our own work and try out some contemplative exercises appropriate for college classrooms.

Now and Then: Talking with First-Generation College Students – Faculty, Staff, and Student Panel.

by Julie Dalley, with featured panelists including staff, current students, faculty members.

Description: This discussion will articulate and share experiences of first-generation college students to identify and examine barriers, challenges, and values that affect our academic success, efforts at community finding and building, and approaches to college learning.

  • Faculty will share their path to academia as first-generation college students in order to give a “then” perspective that contextualizes the history of first-gen and the journey through higher education.
  • Student panelists will share their current experiences and approaches that give a “now” perspective that illuminates the realities of the Gen Z learner, what it means to be first-gen in the present, and what challenges, barriers, and successes are comparable to the past experiences of first-gen students.

Course Planning by the Calendar

This hands-on, course design workshop will use the Magna Commons video “Course-Planning by the Calendar” to guide our own hands-on, interactive session for planning and organizational practices to apply to our Fall 2019 courses.

Video description:

Careful course planning minimizes stress and improves learning by reducing the chances of content crush and panic often experienced at the end of the term.

Learn how to take a more holistic view of your courses by shifting your mindset beyond content to consider course rhythms and the natural ebbs and flows of student motivation.

STEM Pioneers Teaching in STEM Bootcamp (Summer)

This two-day series of teaching and learning workshops will introduce participants to the fundamentals of effective course design, active learning strategies, and other elements of effective teaching strategies for the STEM disciplines.

Agenda:

Day One:  – 9:00am – 3:00pm

  • 9:00am – 9:30am: Intro to the program and the courses – what does it mean to learn in STEM and what are our values as teachers and learners?
  • 9:45am – 11:00am: Creativity and Teaching & Learning – Ashwin Vaidya  
  • 11:15am – 12:30pm: Inquiry-based Labs – Nina Goodey (bring a lab to work on)
  • 11-15am – 12:30pm –  Applying the Fundamentals of Effective Course Design for Learning (working session) – Julie Dalley
  • 12:30pm – 1:30pm – Lunch & Learn – Fundamentals of Course Design (viewing)
  • 1:45pm – 3:00pm – Active Learning Strategies and Authentic Research with Students – Dirk Vanderklein and Josh Galster

Day Two:  9:00am – 3:00pm

  • 9:00am – 11:00am –  Assessment and Feedback on Learning – Julie Dalley
  • 11:15am – 12:30pm – Lunch & Learn – PBL, Teaching Online, or Teaching Gen Z (vote).
  • 1:00pm – 2:30pm – Panel on Montclair State Students – understanding our students and the student experience, with Dr. Jaclyn Friedman-Lombardo (CAPS), Julie Fleming (CSI), and Hamal Strayhorn (Equity & Diversity)-– getting to know our students and the Gen Z perspective.
  • 2:30pm – 3:00pm – Working session – hands-on with guidance from available peers/mentors – GOAL Setting for FALL.

Sparks of Learning 2018 Fall faculty book discussion group.

The Research Academy will facilitate a book discussion group for the Fall 2018 semester centered on the book Sparks of Learning, by Sarah Cavanagh (2016). Meeting once a month, our group will read select chapters of the book, discuss its relevance to our teaching experiences and goals and to its effect on student learning, and develop key takeaways that can be shared with the rest of the Montclair State faculty community.

May 12, 2019 – The 10th Annual University Teaching and Learning Showcase featuring Keynote Speaker Dr. Linda B. Nilson

The Annual University Teaching and Learning Showcase features the best research, practice and collaborative inquiry into excellence in teaching and deep student learning here at Montclair State University. In addition to guest experts, we feature Montclair State faculty members, including current Engage Teaching Fellow program Fellows and Mentors, showcasing their best practices and ongoing scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL).

The full day of presentations, workshops, networking opportunities and poster sessions is supplemented with breakfast, lunch, catered breaks and raffle prizes. Come join your Montclair State colleagues for a day of sharing and collegiality as we talk teaching and learning!

Keynote Speaker

DR. LINDA NILSON, DIRECTOR EMERITA, Office of Teaching Effectiveness and Innovation (OTEI) at Clemson University 

Presenting – Self-Regulated Learning: Active Learning on the Inside

Most students have serious misconceptions about learning, especially about the amount of effort and focus it requires and your role in their learning process. As a result, few students can retain the course content and skills or learn from their mistakes. Self-regulated learning dispels these misconceptions and helps students understand what learning actually involves. After this keynote, you will be able to explain what self-regulated learning (SRL) is, what line of research gave rise to it, and how it enhances student learning and adult success. This keynote will summarize some of the evidence behind this claim. In addition, you will be able to implement SRL activities and assignments for the start and end of a course.

Workshop: Some Self-Regulated Learning Activities and Assignments

This workshop explains and demonstrates specific strategies that you can use to dispel your students’ misconceptions about learning and transform your students into self-regulated learners. By the end, you will be able to design and integrate into your courses proven self-regulated learning assignments and activities, none of which take much time or force you to give up content. This workshop will address a sample of these activities and assignments, specifically, some of those connected to readings (or videos or podcasts), live lectures, assignments and exams. You will also experience two of the activities as students do.

DR. LINDA NILSON

Dr. Nilson co-edited Enhancing Learning with Laptops in the Classroom (Jossey-Bass, 2005) and Volumes 25 through 28 of To Improve the Academy: Resources for Faculty, Instructional, and Organizational Development (Anker/Jossey-Bass, 2007-2010) which is the major publication of the Professional and Organizational Development (POD) Network in Higher Education.

Dr. Nilson’s career as a full-time faculty development director spanned over 25 years. She has published many articles and book chapters and has given over 450 keynotes, webinars and live workshops at conferences, colleges and universities both nationally and internationally on dozens of topics related to college teaching and scholarly productivity. She has also taught graduate seminars on college teaching.

Before coming to Clemson University, she directed teaching centers at Vanderbilt University and the University of California, Riverside and was a sociology professor at UCLA, where she entered the area of educational development. After distinguishing herself as an excellent instructor, her department selected her to establish and supervise its Teaching Assistant Training Program. In sociology, her research focused on occupations and work, social stratification, political sociology and disaster behavior.

Dr. Nilson has held leadership positions in the POD Network, Toastmasters International, Mensa, and the Southern Regional Faculty and Instructional Development Consortium. She was a National Science Foundation Fellow at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where she received her PhD and MS degrees in sociology. She completed her undergraduate work in three years at the University of California, Berkeley, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa.

Key publications by Dr. Linda Nilson:

Conference Schedule

2019 Showcase Schedule and Session Descriptions (opens as PDF)

8:30 a.m.-8:50 a.m.
Breakfast and Sign-In in Conference Center, 7th Floor, University Hall
9:00 a.m.-10:30 a.m.
Opening Keynote: Dr. Linda B. Nilson, Professor Emerita, Clemson University, Self-Regulated Learning: Active Learning on the Inside Main Floor
10:40 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
Linda Thomas & Marylou Naumoff, How to Create Student Group Presentation Magic.
Lesley Sylvan & Michael Boyle, Efforts to Improve Students’ Reading Compliance and Engagement.
Barry Bachenheimer, Grades are overrated: A case study using standards-based assessment in an online graduate level course.
Catherine Baird & Jonathan Howell, Why They Can’t Do Research
11:40 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Linda B. Nilson, Some Self-Regulated Learning Activities and Assignments
Andriy Fomin, Using online quizzes as a learning activity to facilitate understanding(s) in face-to-face Humanities courses
Nina Goodey, Jaclyn Catalano, & Jim Dyer, Teaching Biochemistry with Primary Literature: The Balance Between Content and Skills
Milton Fuentes & Petty Tineo, Understanding and Addressing Our Biases in the Classroom
12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m.
LUNCH – Poster Sessions and Raffle Drawing
Christopher Parker, A.I.M.! Acronyms Improving Modules Making Canvas syllabi more accessible.
Jie Gao, Yawei Wang, and Linan Zhang, Getting engaged: Assessing student perceptions of classroom and online discussions in the team teaching context.
ETFP Through the Years! A curated archive of past projects and research presented via posters created by former Engaged Teaching Fellows and Mentors.
Johanna Quinn, From Papers to Podcasts: Rewriting the Narrative of how College Students Demonstrate Knowledge
1:30 p.m.-2:20 p.m.
Denell Downum & Alfredo Toro Carnivale, Promoting Student Engagement with Reacting to the Past (extended session!)
Todd FedermanSocratic PowerPoint: How to use PowerPoint to create an engaging dialog in the classroom
Julie R. DalleyThe Critical Role of Good Feedback in Learning Assessment
Milton Fuentes, Bryan Murdock & Students, Community Engagement to Support Children Through Optimal Parenting: A Case Study and Panel Discussion
2:30 p.m.-3:20 p.m.
Denell Downum & Alfredo Toro Carnivale, Promoting Student Engagement with Reacting to the Past (extended session!)
Deborah Chatr Aryamontri, Building a Political Career Roman Style: Teaching Through Role-Playing and Contextualizing
Siobhan McCarthy, Making Use of Open Access and Open Education Resources
Apply What You’ve Learned: Course Design Workshop, Free time to work on any aspect of your course with guidance from other faculty and design experts. Take the time to apply what you’ve learned with guidance!

 

Faculty Book Discussion Group- Small Teaching, by James Lang.

Instructors are often frustrated when they want to make changes to their teaching in order to better engage students but lack the time or know-how to make effective changes. I have long advised faculty members to see where they can take incremental steps in instituting changes in their teaching approach or design, whether it be redesigning their syllabus, using new classroom discussion techniques, or revising how they give assessments or design assignments. Small Teaching came out in 2016 and offers a series of strategies and tips for making small changes to activities, assessments and teaching approaches. The purpose of our group will be to discuss, analyze, critique and try out some of Lang’s suggestions, in order to enhance our own teaching and to possibly share these strategies with others. Lang will be the keynote speaker at our 9th Annual University Teaching and Learning Showcase on May 9, 2018, so we will have the chance to listen to him, ask questions and engage in face-to-face discussion concerning the points and strategies in his book.

Contemplative Pedagogy and Teacher Presence in the Classroom

Presented by Dr. Maughn Gregory

In this workshop, we will discuss the multicultural sources of Contemplative Pedagogy (Eastern and Western, spiritual and secular), the variety of its aims and methods, and what it means for teacher presence.  Our discussion will be interspersed with five contemplative exercises appropriate for college classrooms.

Effective Classroom Discussion Strategies

Julie Dalley and Monica Glina

Using proven practices and strong dialogic scholarship, this workshop will interactively present methods and techniques for conducting engaging discussions in your classroom, with a focus on full participation, strategies for the resisting or reluctant student, and most especially methods that ensure that your learning goals are met. We demonstrate and engage all attendees in active learning exercises, with additional resources and strategies shared.

Faculty Book Discussion Group: Small Teaching

by James Lang

Instructors are often frustrated when they want to make changes to their teaching in order to better engage students but lack the time or know-how to make effective changes. I have long advised faculty members to see where they can take incremental steps in instituting changes in their teaching approach or design, whether it be redesigning their syllabus, using new classroom discussion techniques, or revising how they give assessments or design assignments. Small Teaching came out in 2016 and offers a series of strategies and tips for making small changes to activities, assessments, and teaching approaches.

International Scholars Summit

A variety of expert presenters offer a half-day series of workshops and discussions on the topics important to teaching and research for international educators and scholars.

Navigating the Academy: Putting Written/Unwritten to Work

Presented by Dr. Patricia Matthew

Dr. Patricia Matthew will engage the Montclair State University community in an important conversation around the retention of faculty of color at our University and across the United States. The session will benefit faculty of color and colleagues and administrators interested in and committed to these retention efforts.

Embracing diversity and multiculturalism in our classrooms: Addressing pedagogical practices and common teaching challenges

Presented by Dr. Milton Fuentes

Led by a multicultural faculty expert, this workshop will highlight best practices for creating and maintaining culture-centered instruction, while effectively managing common teaching challenges. Strategies for addressing microaggressions, implicit bias and intersectionality will be considered. The workshop is open to seasoned, early career and aspiring instructors.

Contemplative Pedagogy and Teacher Presence in the Classroom

Presented by Dr. Maughn Gregory

In this workshop, we will discuss the multicultural sources of Contemplative Pedagogy (Eastern and Western, spiritual and secular), the variety of its aims and methods, and what it means for teacher presence.  Our discussion will be interspersed with five contemplative exercises appropriate for college classrooms.

Prepared Students, Engaged Discussions, and Other Strategies for Student Engagement and Learning (Brown Bag)

Presented by Julie Dalley

In this brown bag workshop, faculty members will learn five practical strategies for creating prepared students, for leading more engaged discussions, and creating ownership of learning in their students. Drawing on insight and research from higher education scholars, participants will participate in a series of activities, discuss their content, practice interactively some leading preparedness and discussion techniques, and survey their own practices. Feel free to bring your own strategies to enhance or to share with the group.

Evidence-based Practices for Blended Course Design‌

Presented by Dr. Katie Linder

Based on principles from The Blended Course Design Workbook: A Practical Guide, participants in this webinar explore best practices for transitioning a course from a traditional, face-to-face environment to one that is blended. Topics include writing course goals and objectives, developing assessments, designing learning activities and effectively leveraging technology for student success.

“Getting It Done:” Faculty Writing and Balance

Presented by  Tony Spanakos and Julie Dalley

One of the most common challenges for faculty (and staff) is finding the time to ‘get things done.’ Interestingly enough, this is something shared by faculty across levels of seniority and independent of the time spent at Montclair. In other words, adapting to Montclair State University does not mean that scholarly productivity similarly adapts. Faculty committed to research while teaching three courses each semester do not have much time available for research and writing and must be especially careful about how they organize their time. This presentation will focus on concrete strategies aimed at improving organization, increasing productivity, and decreasing frustration and anxiety. It will discuss the organizational, ergonomic and communal elements of research and writing. The scholarship on balancing teaching, writing and service from Robert Bioce, Ernest Boyer and David Allen will be considered and discussed. Bring your own writing challenges, habits, projects or barriers for discussion and development.

Should I Cancel Class?: Responding to Difficult Issues in the Classroom

Presented by Dr. Becky Wai-Ling Packard

In this workshop, Professor Becky Packard will facilitate a discussion involving a set of case scenarios, so we can talk candidly about difficult moments in and out of the classrooms. We will share strategies, whether in advising, in the classroom or among colleagues. For example, how do we provide critical feedback on performance, interrupt problematic classroom dynamics, or ask challenging questions of students/colleagues who may differ from us in terms of race, gender, class or other identities? How do we do so in a way that keeps us moving forward productively through the difficult moment without glossing over or avoiding, or without fear of straining relationships further? Participants will leave with a range of doable action steps and ideas of ways to continue the conversation with their colleagues into the future.

Effective Discussions: Techniques to Engage Students

Presented by Monica Glina, Kathryn Curto, and Julie Dalley

Using proven practices and strong scholarship, this workshop will interactively present methods and techniques for conducting engaging discussions in your classroom, with a focus on full participation, strategies for the resisting or reluctant student, and most especially methods that ensure that your learning goals are met. Among the techniques will be fishbowl discussions, use of class preparation materials, jigsaw discussions, analytic teams and more! Bring a topic or class assignment that uses discussion for hands-on curricular development that leads to deeper student engagement.

Annual Day of Mindfulness

Multiple speakers

Spread awareness of what Mindfulness is, its benefits, and how to use mindfulness practices every day for overall health and wellbeing.

Confessions of a Converted Lecturer

Presented by Eric Mazur

I thought I was a good teacher until I discovered my students were just memorizing information rather than learning to understand the material. Who was to blame? The students? The material? I will explain how I came to the agonizing conclusion that the culprit was neither of these. It was my teaching that caused students to fail! I will show how I have adjusted my approach to teaching and how it has improved my students’ performance significantly.