Special Topics Courses

The following are Special Topics Courses for Summer 2021…

ACCT 577 41
Special Topics in Accounting: Leadership & Entrepreneurship in Private Equity
Private Equity-owned businesses in the “middle market” are having a growing influence over the US economy, accounting for roughly 9 million jobs and 5% of GDP. Due to their ownership structure and financial incentives, they operate very differently than traditional private and corporate businesses. The focus of the course is understanding the strategic and operational challenges of management at Private Equity-owned businesses, which are very different from the imperatives faced by family-owned or public companies or buyouts of big businesses. Appreciation of investor expectations, and the heightened urgency and financial incentives that shape these companies is essential in forming productive partnerships with them as employers, suppliers, customers or clients. Co-sat with FINC 577 41 and MGMT 577 41.
Prerequisites: ACCT 560, FINC 560, FINC 561
ARTH 101 41
Special Topics in Global Art Cultures: Painted Walls in Mesoamerica
Students will learn about the development of art and design practices from different parts of the world using changing thematic lenses and geographic foci. Topics include art’s intersections within a given society’s political, religious, environmental, economic, and social orders, as well as local aesthetics and critical systems of thought. Meets World Cultures Requirement. Fulfills the Special Topics requirement for majors. Meets Gen Ed – Global Cultural Perspectives. This course, in particular, examines painted walls in the Americas, beginning in the Pre-Colombian period and extending to the present. The public aspect of murals is studied against the cultural, political, historical, and religious/ritualistic contexts of several key periods. Also considered is how artists over time sought to reimagine and reframe their cultural and political identities while consciously rooting themselves in their Pre-Colombian past. Special attention is paid to the Mexican Muralists of the 20th century.
BIOL 546 41
Special Topics in Physiology: Advanced Human Physiology
Students work on a specific topic in Physiology or closely related disciplines to summarize the current state of knowledge using primary research studies. A list of topics is suggested but students are encouraged to select their own specific topics of interest to work on. Here are a few examples of the topics students can choose from: “Why stevia and other artificial sweeteners bad for healthy people?” “Adrenal fatigue (sometimes called Adrenic fatigue): how is it measured?” “Sedative effects of alcohol: How does ethanol affect the GABA receptors in the brain?”
BIOL 586 41
Special Topics in Advanced Biology: Toxicology
The study of the adverse effects of chemical, physical, or biological agents on living organisms. These effects are observed at various levels of the body, such as an organ, a type of cell, or a specific biochemical and include the study of prevention and amelioration of such adverse effects.
BIOL 489 11
Special Topics in Organismal Biology: Social Neuroscience
The brain and behavior meet in this class as we examine deception, crime, dating, obsessions, self-awareness, autism and many other topics. How do animals get along or wage war? What hormones induce too much trust? Counts for physiological requirement.
CHAD 610 41
Special Topics in Child Advocacy Seminar: School Social Work
This special topic of social work is intended for students who plan to work in schools or in agencies that are school-based or school-linked. While it is primarily a practice course, it is also a policy course because social work practice in schools is so strongly influenced by state and federal education laws. This course elaborates and builds upon basic skills and knowledge learned in first semester policy and foundation courses to help the student take initial steps toward expertise in school social work and/or providing school-based services and interventions. This course seeks to familiarize students with the roles social workers assume in schools; the culture of primary, middle, and high schools; the psycho-social and developmental needs of the students; and the pressing issues facing schools today, including violence, diversity, racism, homophobia, over-crowding, poverty, and the changing relationship between family, school and community.
COUN 653 41
Special Topics in Counseling: Technology in Counseling
Technology in Counseling is an online, asynchronous, hands-on course designed for students of all technological abilities interested in learning how to integrate technology into counseling practice. The focus is using technology with clients and families to enhance counseling. The course covers legal and ethical considerations, online counseling, using image generators, making gifs, evaluating and using apps, video editing software, and many other types of technology to enhance your clinical, school or higher education practice.
COUN 653 42
Special Topics in Counseling: Counseling LBGTQ
This course will address issues related to LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer) identity development, and will examine issues related to counseling LGBTQ individuals. Issues to be addressed will include sexual identity development, sexual orientation, coming out, homophobia/heterosexism, intersections of multiple identities (i.e. age, racial, ethnic, socioeconomic status, spiritual), family/relationships, aging, health issues, substance use/abuse, counselor ethics/values, counselor biases, and affirmative counseling.
COUN 850 41
Special Topics in Counseling and Supervision: Writing for Publication
This course is designed to assist students in professional writing endeavors through writing, revising, editing, and critiquing their own and peers’ professional writing. Students will select a topic and develop a manuscript suitable for publication throughout the course. The course is designed for individual goals and development. As such, students will determine and contract for an approved written product for the course, in consultation with the instructor.
CSIT 495 21
Special Topics in Undergraduate Computer Science: Cloud Computingco-sat with…
CSIT 595 21
Special Topics in Computer Science: Cloud Computing
Cloud computing has become a new business paradigm and has revolutionized the way how we can access information and run applications over Internet. In particular, the on-demand and pay-as-you-go model of cloud computing benefits many small and medium size businesses who often do not have resources to purchase and maintain their own infrastructure. In this course, students will be introduced to a broad array of cloud computing concepts, models, and techniques. In addition, several key aspects of cloud computing such as virtualization, security, trust, and identity management will be covered via case studies. Students will be exposed to many exciting open research challenges and issues in the field. The mini course project will facilitate students to work in small groups and get hands on experience by working on real-world topics related to cloud computing.
LALS 390 41
Special Topics in Latin American and Latino Studies: Macho Menos: Constructing and Deconstructing Latinx Masculinities co-sat with…
LALS 401 41
Capstone Course in Latin American and Latino Studies: Macho Menos: Constructing and Deconstructing Latinx Masculinities
TA true Latin American/Latino “macho”, has been constructed as a tough, independent, aggressive, dominant, sexually experienced, competitive and emotionally cool “real” man. Defined as hegemonic masculinity, these traditional concepts embody a set of norms that govern the different spheres of daily life, which are not biologically determined, but rather “historical, cultural, psycho-social and interpersonal” in nature. According to Matthew C. Gutmann, “the dominant male ideological expressions of these hegemonic masculinities–for instance, homophobia, machismo, and misogyny–are not simply individual expressions of interpersonal relations in families and households but also pertain to the very foundations of gender inequalities within these societies and internationally.” This course will focus on different representations of “hegemonic masculinities” in film and the politics of resistance among non-heteronormative agents triggered by such representations.
CMST 425 41
Seminar in Mediated Communication: Celebrity and Digital Culture
We live at a moment when celebrity, in all its variations, shapes much of our public discourse. For example, it is likely that more of us are aware of who 6ix9ine is than the person responsible for setting interest rates on credit cards and student loans (Jerome H. Powell—I too had to look it up). Of course, this is not new—celebrities have always been more familiar to us and played a bigger part in our daily lives than most people. However, we also live at a moment when much of the developed world has access to the same technology (an old Android phone) and media platform (Twitter) that enabled Donald Trump to be elected President of the United States of America. The goal of this course is to provide a space to critically examine this moment and the way we engage fame and the forms of publicity that create and nurture it in increasingly digitized environments. To do this, we will consider celebrity in terms of its history, economics, production, and consumption in the context of the evolving media practices and cultural norms tied to digital communication.
EAES 599 11
Special Topics in Earth and Environmental Studies: Industrial Hygiene
Principles of Industrial Hygiene provides an introduction to the field of Occupational Health and emergency response operations. Focus on concepts, terminology, and methodology in the practice of Occupational Health (also known as Industrial Hygiene). Benefits those wishing to pursue a Master’s degree in Industrial Hygiene or Public health; those interested in the Industrial Hygiene, environmental health or safety professional and/or emergency response career fields; and applicable to students in allied disciplines such as Environmental Sciences, Environmental Engineering, and Industrial Engineering. As part of successfully passing the Principles of Industrial Hygiene course, student have an opportunity to attain a 40-hour HAZWOPER certificate (US Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulation 29 CFR 1910.120). Course meets June 28 – July 2. The first 3-4 days will be fully on-line with the last 1-2 days of on-campus, in-person meetings from 8:30am-4:30pm with some outdoor venues (weather permitting); contact department for permit to register, if needed.
HSET 392 11
Special Topics in Hospitality Management: Large Scale Events (PGA The Northern Trust)
This course will provide students “behind the scenes” experience at the PGA TOUR FedEx Cup Playoffs event, THE NORTHERN TRUST. Students will gain hands on experience within a major professional sporting event through service to the Liberty Club, the most premium hospitality venue at THE NORTHERN TRUST. Students will interact with elite members of the metropolitan area and professional athletes while learning the various hospitality aspects of managing a public sport event. Uniforms and meals will be provided.
ELAD 670 41
Special Topics in Administration and Supervision: Crisis Management
The course Selected Topics in Administration and Supervision Crisis Management is designed to provide future educational leaders with exposure to preparing for the unexpected. The course includes content which supports steps educational leaders should consider in regards to mitigation, preparation and recovery. A crisis or disaster can impact the operations of any school and/or district at any time. Having a plan to prepare, respond, and recover has become an unspecified part of the educational leader’s job description. In this course, students will be exposed to characteristics in preventing a school crisis through situational awareness and preparedness. The online course structure, with optional in person meetings, will provide in-depth discussions and practice preparing for the impact of a natural disaster or crisis through preparedness, response and recovery. Students will gain a practical understanding in each of these elements, as well as developing a Continuity of Operation Plan, Reunification Plan, Evacuation Plan, and Bomb-Threat Responses Procedures.
ELAD 670 42
Special Topics in Administration and Supervision: Special Education Law
This course provides an in-depth study of students’, parents’, and teachers’ rights and responsibilities with respect to providing special education and related services to students with disabilities. Topics such as the identification, assessment, and evaluation of students with disabilities; the IEP; when and how to discipline students with disabilities; the impact of harassment, intimidation and bullying on students with disabilities; and Section 504/the Americans with Disabilities Act will be studied both from a federal and state law perspective as well as practical implications for working in the schools. Students will learn how to research special education case law as well as federal and state laws and regulations governing special education.
ELAD 670 43
Special Topics in Administration and Supervision: Special Education Law
This course provides an in-depth study of students’, parents’, and teachers’ rights and responsibilities with respect to providing special education and related services to students with disabilities. Topics such as the identification, assessment, and evaluation of students with disabilities; the IEP; when and how to discipline students with disabilities; the impact of harassment, intimidation and bullying on students with disabilities; and Section 504/the Americans with Disabilities Act will be studied both from a federal and state law perspective as well as practical implications for working in the schools. Students will learn how to research special education case law as well as federal and state laws and regulations governing special education.
ELAD 670 79
Special Topics in Administration and Supervision: Practicum in Educational Leadership
Students will engage in practical and authentic leadership experiences in an urban school setting. Regular meetings and readings support students’ reflection on the responsibilities, dilemmas, and challenges of school leaders and on their own development of the skills and qualities that effective and equity-minded educational leaders need.
FINC 577 41
Special Topics in Finance: Leadership & Entrepreneurship in Private Equity
Private Equity-owned businesses in the “middle market”are having a growing influence over the US economy, accounting for roughly 9 million jobs and 5% of GDP. Due to their ownership structure and financial incentives, they operate very differently than traditional private and corporate businesses. The focus of the course is understanding the strategic and operational challenges of management at Private Equity-owned businesses, which are very different from the imperatives faced by family-owned or public companies or buyouts of big businesses. Appreciation of investor expectations, and the heightened urgency and financial incentives that shape these companies is essential in forming productive partnerships with them as employers, suppliers, customers or clients. Co-sat with ACCT 577 41 and MGMT 577 41
Prerequisites: ACCT 560, FINC 560, FINC 561
FREN 518 41
16th Century Seminar: Performance Culture of Renaissance France
This course will focus on the Performance Culture of Renaissance France (late fifteenth to early seventeenth century). Through our study of storytelling, theatrical, musical, and dance traditions, we will come to an appreciation of the visual, aural, textual, and performative culture of early modern France. From Carnaval and Fêtes des fous to royal entries and courtly ceremonies, this course will examine the intersections of the official and the unofficial; the “popular” and the courtly; the Parisian and the provincial; the oral and the textual; the secular and the religious. Course requirements will include regular weekly readings/viewings and online discussions (recorded and written); an oral presentation; a final exam; and a research paper. Conducted in French. Open to graduate students and advanced undergraduate students.
FSHD 208 41
Special Topics in Family Science and Human Development: Gender and Families: Boys will be Boys
This class provides an overview of the role of gender in our contemporary American society, specifically from an interdisciplinary and social justice perspective. We will explore what it means to be “masculine” or “feminine” in the United States today, and the various ways in which gender organizes and impacts families and communities. Gender will be examined from an intersectional lens, keeping in mind that gender is just one of the many categories shaping our experiences. This course will also discuss relational and social issues where gender inequalities have shown most prominence, such as parenting and household labor, education and healthcare systems, work and paid labor, family violence, and the media. Finally, we will also examine theoretical, methodological, and ethical issues related to gender research.
HLTH 347 41
Special Topics in Health: Grant Writing for Public Health Professionalsco-sat with…
HLTH 525 41
Grant Writing: Public Health Professionals
“This course prepares students to develop proposals to secure grants from various types of funding agencies, including government, foundation, corporate and individual sources. Students develop skills to identify promising funding sources and write effective grant proposals that address important public health needs, are theoretically sound, empirically supported, feasible, and appropriate given the state of the science and practice. Students develop needs assessments that incorporate relevant data, program goals and objectives, clear program plans, evaluation plans, and budgets. By writing a grant proposal over the course of the semester and incorporating feedback, students develop strong grant writing skills through experiential learning.”
HLTH 347 42
Special Topics in Health: Electronic Communication for Public Health: Tools and Techniques
Many people turn to the web as their first source for medical and health-related information. For public health professionals, the opportunity to provide dynamic health education and information via the internet meets their target audience where they already are – in front of their computer and mobile screens. This course will prepare public health professionals to face the challenges of delivering events, courses, and seminars online. Students will explore learning theories critical to understanding online learning, and how these theories (and technologies) intersect with theories of health promotion and behavioral change. Students will explore a variety of educational technologies and learn techniques needed to be effective public health professionals in a world where communication happens more and more online.
HONP 301 41
Honors Seminar on Ways of Knowing: Women and Religion co-sat with…
IMPORTANT SECTION DETAILS: Visiting students welcome; contact department for permit._ COURSE DESCRIPTION: Restriction(s): For Honors Program students only or by permission of instructor. An interdisciplinary perspective on the nature of knowledge, including philosophical definitions of knowledge, the historical interaction of science with philosophical views of knowledge, the social context of knowledge, and the influence of values on the nature and development of knowledge. Meets Gen Ed – Philosophical and Religious Perspectives. This section focuses on women’s role and influence within their religious traditions, particularly in regard to beliefs and customs related to women in a range of religions. The course deals with questions such as the nature of women; gender and spirituality; and patriarchy, religion, and power
RELG 267 41
Women and Religion
IMPORTANT SECTION DETAILS: Visiting students may register without permission from department._ COURSE DESCRIPTION: Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100 or PHIL 102 or PHIL 106 or RELG 100 or RELG 101 or RELG 102. This course focuses on women’s role and influence within their religious traditions, particularly in regard to beliefs and customs related to women in a range of religions. The course deals with questions such as the nature of women; gender and spirituality; and patriarchy, religion, and power Meets the Graduation Writing Requirement for majors in Religious Studies. Meets World Cultures Requirement.
HUMN 320 41
Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Humanities: Bruce Springsteen: The Man and the Music
Bruce Springsteen once wrote, “We learned more from a three-minute record than we ever learned in school” (“No Surrender”). In this course, we will bring those records into our school and learn from them, as we explore the work of Bruce Springsteen, the artists and traditions that influence his music, and the way his work reflects the American experience in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.
MGMT 577 01
Special Topics in Management: Design Your Career
The goal of this course is to bridge practical career readiness and professional development tools with the MBA program’s experiential learning (internship/Co-op) and leadership development curriculum. In this course you will design your distinct career plan, gaining clarity on career paths you want to explore and how best to market yourself for those opportunities. The course will serve to hold you accountable to your career development, integrating your MBA experience with career readiness competencies. The curriculum is indispensable to the successful career outcomes of emerging professionals and will remain sustainable and relevant throughout future career transitions as alumni of Montclair State University.
MGMT 577 41
Special Topics in Management: Leadership & Entrepreneurship in Private Equity
Equity-owned businesses in the “middle market” are having a growing influence over the US economy, accounting for roughly 9 million jobs and 5% of GDP. Due to their ownership structure and financial incentives, they operate very differently than traditional private and corporate businesses. The focus of the course is understanding the strategic and operational challenges of management at Private Equity-owned businesses, which are very different from the imperatives faced by family-owned or public companies or buyouts of big businesses. Appreciation of investor expectations, and the heightened urgency and financial incentives that shape these companies is essential in forming productive partnerships with them as employers, suppliers, customers or clients. Co-sat with ACCT 57741 and FINC 577 41.
Prerequisites: ACCT 560, FINC 560, FINC 561
MUTH 525 41
Special Topics in Music Therapy: Digital Technology ad Advance Music Therapy Practice
This course will cover the theoretical and clinical application of digital music in music therapy, focusing on imaginative listening, typologies and sociocultural history, and approaches to telehealth. Students will create digital compositions related to the course material and clinical practice.
POLS 416 41
Special Topics in Political Science: International Relationsco-sat with…
POLS 526 41
The International Political Economy
The concern of the course is to review the various theoretical explanations of the relationship between politics and economics: to depict the political forces that underpin the international economic system and its institutions and generally to shed light on the salient issues of the global political economy.
POLS 416 42
Special Topics in Political Science: Religion, Law and War
This course will examine wars of religion and religious views of war, focusing particularly on how religion has informed the international laws of war. We are living through an era fraught with religious warfare – wars animated by religious conflict and wars that use religious abuse as weapons to demoralize and subdue the enemy. The course will focus on three major religious traditions (primarily Judaism, Christianity and Islam) and set in dialogue their respective views of war.
SOCI 350 41
Special Topics in Social Issues: Drugs and Society
This course analyzes the phenomenon of drugs through the theories of social construction. Therefore, we examine the questions of how and why society has criminalized drugs at this particular juncture in history. Included in this analysis are the institutions of the sciences, state, the criminal justice system and the media. We also study the implications of these powers on the communities who use drugs and explore alternatives to existing methods of punishment.
SOCI 572 41
Special Topics in Social Research: Environmental Policy
This course will investigate the state of environmental policy making in the United States in the past, present and future. We will focus on how environmental policy goals are affected by diverse populations across the United States and beyond. The course introduces students to texts referencing the interaction of policy, environmental sciences, and ethics across numerous environmental justice topics. Using critical thinking and the application of a framework for studying socio-environmental systems, students will assess how citizens and politicians work together to develop environmental policies.
SPAN 471 41
Contemporary Trends in the Spanish-American Novel: Latin American Women Writers (Undergraduate)
SPAN 548 41
Latin American Novel: After the Boom: Latin American Women Writers (Graduate)
This course will explore the literary production of a group of women writers relegated by the so called “Boom” of the Latin American literature during the 60’s and 70’s of the last century. The emphasis will be on women writers’ strategies for articulating female experiences, some of them very particular to the Latin American cultural, political and economic context. Also, special attention will be devoted to literature as a metaphor for social reality and catalyst for social change. Some of the concepts that will guide our analysis are gender, race, class ethnicity, and social identity, and most importantly, how these concepts are articulated in particular texts by Isabel Allende, Laura Restrepo, Elena Poniatowska and Claudia Piñeiro.
SPED 680 51
Special Topics in Special Education: Virtual Learning for Students with Disabilities
This course serves as a basic introduction to online instruction for both novice and experienced educators of students with disabilities. Candidates will be introduced to popular online classroom platforms in which they can design all aspects of a virtual special education teaching and learning environment. Whether teachers find educational and assistive technology to be fascinating or dull and complicated, they can learn to be successful teaching in an online format and help improve student access, learning, and retention. While educational technologies come into and fall out of favor, the goal of this course is to support educators in identifying how technology can be used to deliver dynamic instruction, engage learners, modify instruction, assess learning, and support individualized education goals.
SPED 680 52
Special Topics in Special Education: Virtual Assessment and Evaluation for Students with Disabilities
During virtual instruction, special education teachers continue to be held accountable for monitoring student progress and using data to inform their instructional decision-making. This course helps special education teachers rethink how they collect and use both formal and informal assessment data to create an organized, coherent virtual assessment system to address routine classroom assessment as well as IEP progress monitoring according to IDEA.
TETD 817 41
Research in Teacher Education: Reimagining Teacher Professional Learning for Social Justice and Equity
This course will explore the ways that we might reimagine teacher learning for social justice and equity. We will begin by trying to understand the terms we use and what scholars, theorists, and practitioners mean by social justice and equity. Using a variety of theoretical and conceptual frameworks – from abolitionist teaching for racial justice to post structural and queer theories – we will ground our work in ideas aimed at creating greater equity and justice. Throughout the course we will examine these ideas in relationship to educational organizations striving to do social justice work in the context of real schools and communities, attempting to understand how they support teachers in learning to do this work through curriculum, pedagogy, and relational practice.