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Antoinette Pole

Associate Professor, Political Science and Law

Office:
Dickson Hall 206
Email:
polea@montclair.edu
Phone:
973-655-7922
Degrees:
BA, SUNY, College at Oswego
PhD, CUNY, Graduate School & University Center
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Profile

Antoinette Pole is an Associate Professor of Political Science & Law at Montclair State University. She studies the intersection of information technology and politics, exploring theoretical questions related to representation and political participation. Professor Pole has authored a book on blogs titled, Blogging the Political: Politics and Participation in a Networked Society (Routledge, 2010)and coauthored, New York Politics: A Tale to Two States, Second Edition (ME Sharpe, 2010). Her work appears in peer-reviewed journals such as New Media & Society, Health Education & Behavior, British Food Journal, Journal of Agriculture and Human Values, Public Choice, American Journal Public Health, and the Journal of Health Communication. Currently, Professor Pole's research focuses on the intersection of food and politics with research on craft beer, competitive foods in schools, and Community Supported Agriculture.

Specialization

-new media (Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, blogs)
-craft beer
-competitive food in schools
-community supported agriculture
-New York state politics

Resume/CV

Office Hours

Fall

Monday
9:30 am - 10:00 am
5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Wednesday
9:30 am - 10:00 am
2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

Links

Research Projects

Craft Beer in New York and SanFrancisco

This project explores various components of microbreweries related to community and environmental sustainability.

Fish Consumption in the US

This project examines fish consumption by US adults in the US by demographic and health variables.

Facebook: Fake News and Unfriending during the 2016 Election

Consisting of two papers, one examines the intersection between Facebook and fake news, and a second paper explores what happens when people were unfriended due to political and social issues.