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Patricia Matthew

Associate Professor, English

Office:
Dickson Hall 357
Email:
matthewp@montclair.edu
Phone:
973-655-7314
Degrees:
BA, Centenary College of Louisiana
MA, Northwestern State University
PhD, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
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Profile

I teach courses in British Romanticism, the history of the novel, and British abolitionist literature. I am the co-editor of a special issue for Romantic Pedagogy Commons and have published essays and reviews in Women’s Writing, Nineteenth-Century Gender Studies, and the Keats-Shelley Journal. I am the editor of Written/Unwritten: Diversity and the Hidden Truths of Tenure (University of North Carolina Press, 2016) and have published essays and books reviews on diversity in higher education in PMLA, The ADE Bulletin, Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, The New Inquiry and The Atlantic. My work on diversity has been featured in The Chronicle of Higher Education, Inside Higher Ed, and The Los Angeles Review of Books. In addition to essays on race and popular culture, I am currently writing a monograph about sugar, gender, and British abolitionist literature.

Specialization

British Romanticism (poetry and fiction), the history of the novel, abolitionist British literature, and women's writing.



Resume/CV

Office Hours

Spring

Monday
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
6:45 pm - 7:45 pm
Thursday
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
6:45 pm - 7:45 am

Links

Research Projects

Current Book Project: "And freedom to the slave"

“And freedom to the slave” links poetry and fiction by regency-era women writers to the material culture (portraits, etchings, and porcelain) of England's debates about slavery and the slave trade and compares that complicated ecosystem to the way contemporary Black women artists like Kara Walker and Amma Asante revisit abolitionist tropes in their work. Based on my findings in museums, galleries, art exhibitions, and archives in England and the United States and recasts popular writers like Jane Austen and Mary Shelley in a new light by showing how they, along with their lesser known contemporaries like Maria Edgeworth and Amelia Opie, not only shaped the contours of the abolitionist movement but the racial politics of the contemporary feminist movement as well.