Aerial photo of Montclair State University campus buildings.

Biennial Review

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Introduction

The Drug-Free Schools and Campus Regulations (34 CFR Part 86) of the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (DFSCA) require that institutions of higher learning (IHE) such as Montclair State University adopt, implement and evaluate programs to prevent the misuse or abuse of alcohol and use or distribution of illicit drugs both by university students and employees, both on its premises and as a part of any of its activities. At a minimum, each institution of higher education must annually distribute the following in writing to all students and employees:

  • Standards of conduct that clearly prohibit the unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees.
  • A description of the legal sanctions under local, state or federal law for the unlawful possession or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol.
  • A description of any drug or alcohol counseling, treatment or rehabilitation or re-entry programs that are available to employees or students.
  • A clear statement that the institution will impose sanctions on students and employees and a description of those sanctions, up to and including expulsion or termination of employment and referral for prosecution, for violations of the standards of conduct.

The law further requires that the institution conduct a biennial review of its program with the following objectives: (1) determining the effectiveness of the policy and implementing changes to the Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) program if they are needed; and (2) to ensure that the sanctions developed are enforced consistently.

The biennial review must also include a determination as to: (1) the number of drug- and alcohol-related violations and fatalities occurring on the campus, or as part of their activities that are reported to campus officials; and (2) the number and type of sanctions the IHEs impose on students or employees as a result of such violations or fatalities.

Montclair State University acknowledges its legal obligation to conduct a biennial review of compliance with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act.  The intention of this document is to comply with the legal requirements as set forth by the DFSCA and to discuss prevention and education related programs, initiatives and activities related to Montclair State University’s Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Project during the 2016-2017 and 2017-2018 academic years.

Biennial Review Process

Dr. Marie Cascarano, Health Promotion Coordinator, formed a committee to participate in the review process. The members of the review committee include:

  • Jerry Collins, Director of Student Conduct
  • Dr. Kristine DeJesus, Staff Psychologist
  • Virginia Mohr, Associate Director of Campus Recreation

The following campus departments and offices provided information for this report:

  • Office of Health Promotion
  • Counseling and Psychological Services
  • Department of Campus Recreation
  • Office of Student Conduct
  • The Division of Student Development and Campus Life
  • University Police Department
  • University Health Center
  • Human Resources
  • Athletics

The following documents and programs were considered when compiling the biennial review.

  • Advisory Committee on Alcohol and Other Drugs meeting minutes
  • Office of Health Promotion Annual Reports
  • ACHA-NCHA II data (Spring 2017)
  • Campus Recreation Annual Reports
  • CSI Annual Reports
  • CAPS Annual Reports
  • Student Conduct Data
  • Student Handbook- University Policies
  • Clery Act information
  • Alcohol Permit Requests

Montclair State University Biennial Review Policies and Procedures

Policy: The Drug-Free Schools and Campus Regulations (34 CFR Part 86) of the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (DFSCA) require that each participating institutions of higher learning (IHE) certify that it has developed and implemented a drug and alcohol abuse education and prevention program. The program must be designed to prevent the unlawful possession, use, and distribution of drugs and alcohol on campus at recognized events and activities.

Procedure: The areas responsible for Montclair State University’s Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Program are the Office of Health Promotion, Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) and the Office of the Dean of Students.  These areas will work collaboratively and closely with campus departments and offices to ensure compliance of The Drug-Free Schools and Campus Regulations (34 CFR Part 86) of the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (DFSCA).  These offices include, but are not limited to Residence Life, Campus Recreation, the Center for Student Involvement, Intercollegiate Athletics, University Police Department and the University Health Center.

Policy: On an annual basis, the IHE must distribute written information about its drug and alcohol abuse prevention program (DAAPP) to all students, faculty, and staff.  The distribution plan must make provisions for providing the material to students who enroll at a date after the initial distribution, and for employees who are hired at different times throughout the year.  The information must include:

  1. A written statement about its standards of conduct that clearly prohibit the unlawful possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees;
  2. A written description of the legal sanctions under local, state, or federal law for the unlawful possession or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol;
  3. A description of the health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol;
  4. A description of any drug or alcohol counseling, treatment, or rehabilitation or re-entry programs that are available to employees or students; and,
  5. A statement that the IHE will impose sanctions on students for violations of the institution’s codes of conduct and a description of such sanctions.

Procedure: The responsible areas will work together, along with Student Communications, on a regular basis to ensure that the policies, legal and conduct sanctions, health risks, counseling, rehabilitation and treatment options are up to date and available on the University website.  Dr. Karen Pennington, Vice President of Student Development and Campus Life will distribute frequent notifications to all students, faculty and staff.  This information will be disseminated at the start of each new term in order to capture any newly enrolled students and employees.  This includes the start of the winter session and at the start of each summer session.

Policy: Determining the effectiveness of the policy and implementing changes to the Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) program if they are needed.   Recommended evaluation methods include a) the number of students attending self-help or counseling groups that address alcohol or other drug use; b) students’ attitudes and perceptions about the alcohol or other drug problems on campus; and c) levels of use of alcohol and other drugs by students.

Procedure: The Office of Health Promotion will continue to conduct the American College Health Association’s National College Health Assessment (NCHA-ACHA II) every two years.   Data collected from this survey will determine students’ attitudes and perceptions about the alcohol or other drug problems on campus and use of alcohol and other drugs by students.  The number of students attending the campus sponsored “Recovery Room” will be logged each year, along with students who are referred to ECHO (Exploring Choices and Healthy Options).

Policy: Ensure that the sanctions developed are enforced consistently.

Procedure: Students who are held accountable for policy violations under the University Code of Conduct receive sanctions and educational stipulations that correspond to specific violations. Each University administrator who serves the University in a disciplinary role uses a Sanctioning Outcome Guide to guide the sanction(s) and stipulation(s) portion for each violation (see appendix for Sanctioning Outcome Guide). The guide was created by representatives from the Office of the Dean of Students, Student Conduct, and CAPS who determined what outcomes and stipulations would be appropriate for the given situation.  In addition, regularly scheduled training is conducted with any member of staff who serves as a hearing officer for violations, including those in the Office of Dean of Students, Student Conduct and Residence Life.

Policy: Ensure that biennial reviews are conducted in a timely manner and fully documented.

Procedure:  The Office of Health Promotion will continue to conduct a thorough review of the University’s alcohol and other drug program every two years on even numbered years. A team will be identified by the Health Promotion Coordinator each biennial review year to assist with the process. The biennial review will be completed and filed by December 31 of the biennial review year.

Notification Process

Compliance with Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act.

Montclair State University continues to work towards fulfilling all requirements of the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act and maintain compliance.

Coordinated by the Office of Health Promotion, Montclair State University’s Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Project is a comprehensive, evidence-informed practice designed to implement and evaluate campus and community-based strategies to prevent high-risk drinking and substance use/abuse among college students. It is a collaborative effort involving Health Promotion, Counseling and Psychological Services, the Office of Student Conduct and other campus and community partners.

Notifications

During the 2016-2018 Biennial Review period, the University distributed information about its drug prevention programs and policies to all students, faculty and staff at the beginning of each new academic term including winter session and the start of each summer session.

Websites that address University Alcohol and Other Drug Policies

Students, staff, faculty and guests can find Montclair State University policies on several websites:

Research Methods and Data Analysis

ACHA-NCHA II

The Office of Health Promotion gathers quantitative data using the ACHA-NCHA II, an established survey questionnaire created by the American College Health Association. This survey is typically done every two years on odd numbered years.  IRB approval was obtained before beginning this study.  IRB protocol was strictly followed while obtaining data for this study.   The study aimed to address the following research questions:

  1. What is the pattern of alcohol and other drug use among current undergraduate students?
  2. What is the perception of others regarding alcohol and other drug use?
  3. What percentage of students received alcohol and other drug information from the University?

Alcohol and Other Drug Prevalence Rates, Incidence Rate, Needs Assessment and Trend Data

A random sample of students was selected from undergraduate students enrolled during the spring 2017 semester. This survey is typically done every two years on odd numbered years. There were 551 respondents to the survey.  Several descriptive and inferential analyses of the data were performed.  Some key findings included:

  • 82% of students received information about alcohol and other drug use.
  • 22% never used alcohol; 16% used but not in the last 30 days; 37% used 1-5 days within the last 30 days; 2.7% used daily.
  • 78% of students consumed 4 or fewer drinks the last time they “partied” or “socialized”.
  • 58% of students never used marijuana; 22% used, but not in the last 30 days; 3% used daily.
  • 94% of students never used cocaine (crack, rock, freebase); 4% have used, but not in the last 30 days; <1% are daily users.
  • 99% never used Methamphetamine; 1% have used, but not in the last 30 days; <1% are daily users.
  • 98% never used opioids (heroin, smack); 1.6% have used, but not in the last 30 days; <1% are daily users.
  • 4% of students used a prescription pain killer (OxyContin, Vicodin, codeine) within the last 12 months that was not prescribed to them.
  • 2% of students used a prescription sedative (Xanax, Valium) within the last 12 months that was not prescribed to them.
  • 6% of students used a prescription stimulant (Ritalin, Adderall) within the last 12 months that was not prescribed to them.

Student perception of students’ use:

  • 7% never used alcohol; 2.5% have used but not in the last 30 days; 19.2% use daily
  • 9% of students never used marijuana; 3.5% have used but not in the last 30 days; 22.2% use daily
  • 2% never used cocaine; 16.8% have used but not in the last 30 days; 3% are daily users
  • 1% never used opioids (heroin, smack); 17.5% have used but not in the last 30 days; 2.6% used daily
Frequency of alcohol consumption within the last 30 days National
N=47,821
Montclair State University
N=551
Never Used 22.2% 22.2%
Have used, but not in last 30 days 14.9% 15.8%
1-2 days 17.7% 20.6%
3-5 days 17.7% 16.1%
6-9 days 15.2% 10.3%
10-19 days 10% 7.5%
20-29 days 2.5% 4.7%
Used daily 0.8% 2.7%

 

Frequency of marijuana use within the last 30 days National
N=47,821
Montclair State University
N=551
Never Used 58.6% 58.7%
Have used, but not in last 30 days 19.4% 21.8%
1-2 days 8.1% 6.2%
3-5 days 3.9% 3.9%
6-9 days 2.8% 2.2%
10-19 days 2.6% 2.0%
20-29 days 1.8% 2.7%
Used daily 2.7% 3.2%

 

Students who consumed 5+ drinks within the last 2 weeks National
N=47,821
Montclair State University
N=551
N/A (Don’t Drink) 26% 28.5%
None 40.9% 42.9%
1-2 times 23.4% 22.9%
3-5 times 15.1% 4%
6 or more times 2.9% 1.7%
Number of drinks consumed last time students “partied” or socialized. National Montclair State University
4 or fewer 71% 78.3%
5-6 15.5% 13.9%
7 or more 13.5% 7.7%

The following statistics report both criminal and University policy related alcohol and drug violations.

Alcohol Policy Violations Data

Alcohol Policy Violations Chart from 2008-2018

Chart with the alcohol violations by age group from 2008-2018

Chart with the alcohol policy violations between residential and commuter students between 2008-2018

Chart plotting the medical transports between 2009-2018

Chart plotting the medical transports by semester.

Drug Violations Data

Chart plotting the drug violations between 2008-2018

Chart plotting the drug violations by age.

Chart plotting the drug violations between residential vs commuter students.

Policy, Enforcement of Disciplinary Sanctions & Compliance Inventory

University conduct policy is overseen by the Vice President of Student Development and Campus Life with the Office of the Dean of Students, in consultation with University Counsel.

The Director of Student Conduct, within the Office of the Dean of Students, is charged with monitoring policy as well as overseeing the timely administration of the conduct process, entailing the adjudication of all reported incidents, establishing educational outcomes, including sanctions and stipulations, for violators of policy.

Consistency of Enforcement of Disciplinary Sanctions

Students who are held accountable for policy violations under the University Code of Conduct receive sanctions and educational stipulations that correspond to specific violations. Each University administrator who serves the University in a disciplinary role uses a Sanctioning Outcome Guide to guide the sanction(s) and stipulation(s) portion for each violation. The guide was developed by representatives from the Office of the Dean of Students, Student Conduct, and Counseling and Psychological Services, who in turn determined what outcomes and stipulations would be appropriate for the given situation regarding incidents that involve drugs and/or alcohol.

In addition, annual training is conducted with any member of staff who serves as a hearing officer for violations, including members of the Office of the Dean of Students, Office of Student Conduct and the Office of Residence Life. Analysis of the reasoning is provided in the guide, both from the educational perspective, as well as for consistency expectations. All students are held to this guide, regardless of individual factors such as their engagement activity status, grade point average, etc. at the University.

University Alcohol and Other Drug Policy

As stated in the University Student Handbook, the policy reads as follows:

B. Alcohol Violation

Minimum sanction: Warning; Maximum sanction: Expulsion.

Drinking or being in possession of any alcoholic beverage in public or private areas of University premises not approved for such activity, possession and/or consumption by a minor; public intoxication; soliciting University students and minors to purchase alcohol off-campus, and driving while intoxicated.

  1. Common Sources/Bulk Containers: Possessing, furnishing, or serving from a common source of alcohol (i.e. kegs, mini-kegs, beer balls, punch bowls, or other approximate equivalent number of servings) is prohibited. Bulk containers and/or mass quantities of any alcohol are not permitted in apartments, suites, and/or individual rooms. Sanctions apply to all students (residents and non-residents) present at the time of the infraction and/or for all students (residents and non-residents) who were involved in any way in planning or hosting an event at which a common source or bulk container is provided. In addition, empty kegs, mini-kegs, beer balls, and/or any tapping devices are not permitted in any apartment, suite, or individual room for any purpose, including use as decorations and/or furnishings.
  2. Rapid Consumption: Objects and drinking apparatuses or methods that promote irresponsible binge consumption of alcohol, which include, but are not limited to, funnels, beer bongs, or drinking games, including imitations or non-alcoholic beverages (i.e. root beer pong) are prohibited. All individuals present at the time of the infraction may be charged for a policy violation.
  3. Residence Halls and Hawk Crossings Apartments:The University promotes an alcohol-free residence hall community as part of a strong academic environment. Because the majority of campus residents are under age and due to the challenges of alcohol abuse, alcohol is prohibited in the residence halls and Hawk Crossing Apartments. Possession of alcohol, or empty alcohol cans, bottles, etc., constitutes a violation and may result in strict disciplinary action and/or dismissal from the residence community. Students may be asked to reveal the contents of bags, boxes, etc., if reasonable suspicion of possible alcohol possession exists.
  4. The Village at Little Falls Party Policy: In keeping with NJ laws regarding alcohol, and the University’s own philosophy regarding substance use and abuse, only Village residents 21 years of age or older may possess and consume alcohol inside their apartments and only under the following conditions: 1) no alcohol deliveries are permitted to the apartments, 2) no alcohol is permitted outside the buildings or in hallways/stairwells, or other common areas outside of apartments and 3) no alcohol is given to individuals under 21 years of age.
    a. Quantities. Quantities of alcohol are limited based on the guidelines outlined in the Office of Residence Life handbook, which are as follows: 1 liter of hard liquor per apartment; or 1 case (24 count) of 12 oz. bottles/cans of beer per apartment; or 1 gallon table wine per apartment. Empty containers are subject to these stated alcohol limits.
    b. Roommates. Students under 21 years old sharing an apartment in The Village with students who are 21 years old or older may be in the presence of alcohol within their apartment ONLY; however, the underage individuals are NOT allowed to consume or possess alcohol.
  5. The Village at Little Falls Party Policy. Parties involving alcohol are prohibited at The Village at Little Falls. An alcohol party will be defined as any gathering of residents where alcohol is being served or consumed and one or more of the following conditions exists: 1) there is obvious traffic in and out of the apartment/stairwell/hallway, 2) excessive noise exists, as determined by neighbors and/or staff, and 3) the total number of persons in the apartment reaches or exceeds the maximum occupancy assigned to the apartment which is a maximum total of 12 persons. Residents found hosting parties would be subject to immediate suspension from The Village apartments and face disciplinary action. Guests attending a party will be subject to disciplinary action as appropriate.

H. Drug Violations

Minimum sanction: Probation; Maximum sanction: Expulsion.

  1. The intent of, actual distribution of, sale of or manufacturing of drugs, narcotics, barbiturates, hallucinogens, marijuana, steroids, amphetamines or any other controlled substance is prohibited.
  2. The possession or use of controlled dangerous substances, marijuana, steroids, or narcotics, including, but not limited to, opium (morphine, codeine, heroin), prescription drugs in possession of someone other than the prescribed individual, misuse of prescribed drugs, and every other substance not chemically distinguishable from them (i.e. imitation/synthetic products such as bath salts and/or K2) as well as any drug paraphernalia, on campus or in any University-related premises is prohibited. This includes marijuana prescribed for debilitating medical conditions as it is not allowed on University property.

*Students should be aware that federal law dictates that conviction in criminal court for certain controlled substance offenses including drug possession and/or sale may make them declared ineligible for Federal financial aid for a period of time. See the Financial Aid Office for details.

Medical Amnesty Policy

Providing the Path to help Yourself and Friends

I. Philosophy

  1. The health and safety of members of the Montclair State University community is of paramount concern.
  2. Students need to seek immediate medical attention for themselves or others when someone’s health and/or safety is at risk.
  3. Students may be reluctant to seek assistance for themselves or someone else for fear of facing action from the University conduct process.
  4. Montclair State University seeks to remove barriers that prevent students from seeking the medical attention they need in emergency situations.

II. Policy

  1. Students who seek emergency medical attention for themselves or for whom medical assistance was sought related to consumption of alcohol and/or drug overdose will not be charged with violations of the Montclair State University Code of Conduct associated with that action (specifically: Section II, Letter B and/or Letter. G.), provided they comply with the following conditions:
    1. I. The student subsequently completes an evaluation, ECHO, and any recommended treatment at the University Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) Center.
    2. II. This follow-up must be completed within a time frame determined by the University.
    3. III. Failure to complete this evaluation/treatment may result in discipline charges filed with the Office of Student Conduct.
  2. Students who seek emergency medical attention for someone else will not be charged with violations of the Montclair State University Code of Conduct related to consumption of alcohol, alcohol intoxication, and/or drug use (specifically: Section II, Letter B. and G., respectively), provided that the student subsequently participates in a meeting with and complies with all recommended stipulations established by the University Director of Student Conduct.
  3. Student organizations who wish to employ MAP will be determined on a case-by-case basis.
  4. MAP applies only to those students or organizations who seek emergency medical assistance in connection with alcohol or drug overdose and does not apply to individuals experiencing an alcohol medical emergency who are found by University employees. (I.e. University Police, faculty, administrative staff, community directors, community assistants, etc…)
  5. The Montclair State University MAP is not intended to shield or protect those students or organizations that repeatedly violate the Code of Conduct. In cases where repeated violations of the Montclair State University Code of Conduct occur, the University reserves the right to take disciplinary action on a case by case basis regardless of the manner in which the incident is reported. Additionally, the University reserves the right to adjudicate any case in which the violations are determined by the University in its sole discretion to be egregious.
  6. The Office of Student Conduct reserves the right to contact any student to discuss an incident whether or not the Montclair State University MAP is in effect.
  7. Information concerning students who utilize MAP is confidential, but will be recorded for case management purposes.
  8. MAP does not preclude students from being held responsible for other violations of the Code of Conduct.
  9. Parental Notification will still apply if applicable under the University Parental Notification Policy.

(Note: This Policy only provides amnesty from violations of the Montclair State University Student Code of Conduct. It does not grant forgiveness for criminal, civil, or legal consequences for violations of Federal, State, or Local law. However, the “911 Lifeline Legislation “approved on October 1, 2009, P.L.2009, c.133 does allow for underage individuals to receive amnesty in accordance with the provisions of the law. Individuals must stay on scene and assist responders with information concerning the at-risk individual to comply with the law. Further, Good Samaritan Emergency Response Act, approved on May 2, 2013 (A578/S851), allows for the same regarding drug overdoses.)

Adopted on 11/4/2009; Updated 6/15/2013

On Campus: Call Montclair State University Police –

      • x5222 from any campus phone
      • 973-655-5222 from a cell phone or non-campus phone
      • Blue Light Phone: press the button
      • 911 from any phone if off-campus

Alcohol Emergency Information

How to help a friend who has had too much to drink

Alcohol poisoning can be fatal. If someone has had too much to drink or gets hurt while drinking, call for help immediately and stay with the person until help arrives.

In cases of a potential head injury, even if the person regains consciousness, he or she must be evaluated immediately.

Signs of alcohol poisoning

      • Vomiting, vomiting while passed out, not waking up after vomiting or incoherent while vomiting.
      • Inability to rouse the person with loud shouting or vigorous shaking.
      • Inability of a person who was passed out to stay awake for more than 2-3 minutes.
      • Slow or irregular breathing or lapses in breathing.
      • Weak pulse, very rapid pulse or very slow pulse.
      • Cold, clammy or bluish skin.

What to do

      • Call for help by calling Montclair State Police (see above).
      • Stay with the person until help arrives.
      • Turn the person on his/her side to prevent choking if the person vomits. Do not think that is all you need to do – call for help!
      • Be prepared to give the emergency medical personnel as much information as possible, including any drugs or medications taken.

What NOT to do

      • Don’t just let them “sleep it off.” Get medical help.
      • Do not hesitate to call for help (see above). Drinking to intoxication is a medical issue and the person’s life is in danger. Better to be safe than sorry.
      • Do not leave the person alone. The person may seem to be okay, but the alcohol ingested may take some time to be absorbed before peak levels are reached in the brain.
      • Do not leave the person lying on his/her back.
      • Do not try to give the person anything to eat or drink.
      • Do not put the person in a cold shower. The person could fall or the shock could make him/her pass out.

Adapted from Lehigh University with permission

Parental Notification

Montclair State University is committed to the elimination of alcohol and drug abuse and misuse within the University community. Accordingly, the University has long held policies regarding the use of alcohol and drugs on campus.

In 1998, the Higher Education Reauthorization Act of 1998 (HERA) amended the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) to allow institutions of higher education to notify parents or guardians of students under the age of 21 of the final outcome of an alcohol or drug violation.

While Montclair State University will continue to respond to underage drinking and drug infractions as violations of the law, there may be times where parental notification serves as an additional resource for students. It is, therefore, the intent of Montclair State University to adopt the following parental notification policy, both for incidents that take place on campus and off campus involving students:

      1. Montclair State University will notify, by mail, parents and/or guardians of students under the age of 21 (at the time of adjudication) that their student has been found responsible for violating the University’s alcohol or drug policies. This will occur after a finding of responsibility for the second alcohol or drug offense, except in such cases detailed in # 4.
      2. Students whose parents will be notified of an alcohol or drug violation will be officially informed of such after a finding of responsibility is made and stated in the student’s outcome letter. This will allow the student to make contact with his or her parents or guardians prior to the letter arriving.
      3. Letters will include resources available at the University and the nearby community to assist the student and his/her family should they wish to pursue counseling or other assistance. Letters will not include specifics concerning the incident.
      4. In specific cases, the University will notify the parents or guardians of students under 21 years of age following a first violation. Examples of such cases may be as follows:
        • The incident involved significant property damage.
        • The incident involved a reckless disregard for the safety of the individual and/or others, including but not limited to hospital transports.
        • The incident was accompanied by other serious violations of University policy.
      5. In cases where the student is in the foster care system, letters may be directed to the Dean of Students.

Parental notification will take place only after the appeal process if the student is found responsible.

Sample Parental Notification letter

December 12, 2018

To the Parents/Guardians of:
Student Name
Address
Address 2

Dear Mr. /Mrs. Name:

Montclair State University is committed to the elimination of alcohol and drug abuse and misuse within the University community.  The University has long held policies regarding the use of alcohol and drugs on campus.  The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) makes it possible for us to expand our efforts in this area by involving you as your student’s parent or guardian.  By informing you about the alcohol or other drug violation that has occurred, we hope to broaden and strengthen the network of support and concern for students in their growth and development.

I am writing to inform you that your student, Name, has been held responsible for disciplinary violation of the Montclair State University’s Student Code of Conduct regarding an inappropriate possession and/or use of alcohol/drugs.

The conduct process at Montclair State University is intended not to impose punishment on its students, but to help educate and challenge them to make responsible life choices.  Therefore, your student’s outcome has included an educational component.  Some of these options include computerized educational products, such as:

      • 3rd Millennium – 3rd Millennium courses provide relevant behavioral health information in a fast-paced, interactive format. Personalized feedback and social norms surveys help the student clarify their thinking about alcohol & other drugs. The student can also hear and read opinions and feedback from their peers.
      • The Judicial Educator – an on-line service provided by Reslife.net.  Designed to provide information on specific behaviors. The Judicial Educator allows students to read through an assigned area, followed by a post-test.  Upon their completion of the test (with a passing test score), the conduct officer is notified that the student has satisfactorily completed the assignment.
      • e-CHUG/e-TOKE – a brief interactive online learning tool which allows the self-assessment of the student concerning their use of alcohol (electronic Check-UP to Go) or drugs (electronic THC Online Knowledge Experience).  There are opportunities for students to learn about their own drinking/drug habits and risks, followed by a self-test and report that the student prints and submits to the conduct officer at the completion of the program.
      • ECHO – the Exploring Change and Healthy Options program provides students with the opportunity to explore their alcohol and other drug use in a non-judgmental environment with members from Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS). Students typically meet with the CAPS staff for 3-4 individual meetings.

Additionally, the University has a variety of on-campus resources, such as University Health and Counseling Services for individual counseling, and contacts in the surrounding community for students to use if needed.

We believe that students over age 18 are adults, and we encourage them to assume responsibility for their actions.  However, the legal drinking age of 21 means that even as adults there are still privileges that are not rights and pursuing them is a violation of the law and University policy, as is the case with any illegal controlled substance regardless of age.  The process of parental notification is intended to provide a conduit between the University, the student, and the family to discuss and work through these important issues.  We encourage you to talk with your student about the use of alcohol or drugs and their accompanying effects.  We suggest that you express your concerns and expectations through frank and open discussion to facilitate better health, better relationships, and academic success.

If you have questions about the University’s disciplinary procedures, you may contact me at 973-655-4118.  I will not be able to discuss any other disciplinary issues specific to your student without a Release of Information Form signed by the student, but will be happy to offer our assistance to you on this matter or any general questions or concerns.

Sincerely,

Jerry S. Collins
Director of Student Conduct
Office of the Dean of Students

c: Yolanda Alvarez, Associate Dean of Students
Student Name (electronic copy only)
Student File

Athletic Department AOD Use Policy

Montclair State University Athletic Department Position on Alcohol and Other Drugs:

      1. The Athletic Department of Montclair State University condemns the use of any drug, either recreational or performance enhancing, by staff members, volunteers and student-athletes. Coaches and staff are compelled to emphasize this statement and enforce the sanctions.
      2. The NCAA condemns the use of non-therapeutic drugs of any kind by any of its member institutions or affiliated organizations. In Division III, the NCAA reserves the right to drug test student-athletes competing in NCAA post-season championships. Any athlete who tests positive will follow all NCAA sanctions. Specific drugs, which are banned, include:
        • Cocaine
        • Heroin
        • Marijuana
        • Steroids
        • Non-authorized prescription drugs
        • Alcohol abuse by those over age 21
        • Alcohol use or abuse by those underage

        The NCAA has an extensive list of banned substances. Not only are illegal drugs on the list, but a number of common over-the-counter drugs are also included. The banned list is available from the Athletic Training Staff and may be accessed on the NCAA website. Each student-athlete will be asked to sign and acknowledge that he or she knows and understands the NCAA substance abuse policy. If the student-athlete refuses to sign this statement, he or she will be declared ineligible for competition.

      3. Alcohol may be the biggest problem we deal with on a day to day basis. Alcohol use is not permitted during departmental activities. These activities include:
        • Practice
        • Competition
        • Team Travel
      4. Sanctions: Student-athletes involved in improper use of alcohol or drugs on campus will be subject to university disciplinary action for those offenses. There may be additional athletic department sanctions applied as well. Any or all of the following sanctions may be applied:
        • Letter of apology
        • Game or contest suspension
        • Taking full financial responsibility for any inappropriate behavior
        • Community service activities
        • Required counseling
        • Meeting with the Director of Athletics
        • Indefinite suspension from the team
        • Dismissal from the team
        • Immediate return to campus if the inappropriate behavior occurs during a team sponsored trip)

NJAC Tobacco Policy

The NCAA and NJAC policy “bans the use of tobacco-related products by any of our players, coaches, or other team personnel at practices, meetings or contests.” This includes cigarettes, cigars, snuff and chewing tobacco. The penalties are “First Offense- written warning to coach/player, Second Offense – immediate suspension for one game.”

Student Organization Summary

The Center for Student Involvement (CSI) serves as a clearinghouse for student clubs and organizations. CSI provides organizations with a handbook of information, guidelines and policies for hosting events on campus. The handbook states:

      • Alcohol Policy
        “On occasion when someone brings alcohol into an area where it is not permitted, the CSI Representative will inform the individual of the University’s alcohol policy and present the alternative. That individual is asked to dispose of the alcohol themselves or give it to the staff member to discard. Should the individual refuse to do so, they will not be permitted to enter the event. If the person is being disruptive and/or appears incoherent or inebriated, assistance from University Police and/or CSI will be sought.”
      • Admission Procedures
        “The sponsoring student organization and Montclair State University Police have the right to be selective in the cases where a student or guest is visibly intoxicated, high or extremely belligerent.”

Employee Assistance Program Referral Policy

The Montclair State University Employee Assistance Program (EAP) is outsourced to a third party provider. The EAP services are administered by CONCERN, an organization that offers assessment, short-term counseling, referrals and follow-ups to employees wanting or requiring assistance with stress and other life or work problems.

CONCERN primarily focuses on the following issues:

      • Family or marital relationships
      • Births/Childrearing
      • Relocation
      • Death
      • Alcohol and drugs
      • Emotional and psychological adjustments
      • Legal issues
      • Financial issues
      • Retirement

When specialized services are required, CONCERN counselors will assist with referrals to specialists (i.e. psychiatric, addiction). CONCERN Counselors will also determine the appropriate level of care prior to the referral and health insurance utilization.

CONCERN is a division of Atlantic Health System’s Behavioral Health Services. Montclair State University employees are able to visit any of the six locations for assessment and/or short-term counseling sessions.

Locations:

      • Hackettstown, NJ
      • Upper Montclair, NJ
      • Morristown, NJ
      • Somerville, NJ
      • Summit, NJ
      • Teaneck, NJ

Appointments are available 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. (Monday through Friday) and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. (Saturdays). A 24-hour hotline is also available. All information shared is confidential. Services are provided to all Montclair State University employees and/or members of their immediate household.

Sale, Service and Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages

Alcohol Procedure and Policy

All alcoholic beverages are to be sourced by Chartwells and remain within the facility. Beverages not consumed will remain the property of Chartwells, in accordance with the laws of New Jersey.  It is the policy of Montclair State University that no alcoholic beverages are brought on the premises without an appropriate Special Events Permit from the state ABC, as this action violates the liquor license.  In addition, Montclair State University requires that a Request for Alcohol Service on Licensed Premises Form be completed for all events serving alcohol no later than two weeks prior to your event.

The below figures represent the alcohol-related events that have been scheduled and worked by Dining Services for Montclair State University. This includes all event on campus: Conference Center, Red Bulls, Homecoming, etc.

      • 2016-2017- 46 events
      • 2017-2018- 59 events

All Montclair State events, where alcoholic beverages are served, are subject to having an officer or officers on scene during the event.  This is to ensure that all state and local laws are adhered too, as well as to ensure that should any violations occur it can be addressed promptly. During Red Bull games there is a minimum of three officers on duty for the match, and an officer is posted in the concessions area where the alcoholic beverages are sold.

The parent company of the New Jersey Jackals operates the venue with its own liquor license independent of the University.  However, the University Police Department is hired to work the games and events.  The staff of the NJ Jackals are trained to distribute alcoholic beverages.  Patrons are unable to purchase more than two beverages per transaction at one time.  Additionally, all sales of alcoholic beverages are closed during the 7th inning of play.  Officer and members of the NJ Jackals pay extra attention to ensure that beverages are not purchased by individuals of age and then given to individuals who may be under the age to consume alcoholic beverages. It is commonplace to have these spot checks.

Alcohol and Other Drug Education and Prevention

Though the Office of Health Promotion is the primary provider of alcohol and other drug prevention education, many departments and campus partners are involved in educating students, staff, faculty and families.  Below is a summary of initiatives:

Advisory Committee on Alcohol and Other Drugs (ACAD): The Advisory Committee on Alcohol and Other Drugs at Montclair State University is a coalition of campus and community members who collaborate on issues relating to substance use and abuse, and educational efforts within the campus. The Advisory Committee is responsible for developing, implementing and evaluating educational and environmental approaches aimed at reducing risk related to alcohol and other drug use. With the use of evidence-based educational programs, policy recommendations and on-going research, the Advisory Committee strives to provide members of the University community with tools for making informed decisions that will foster academic success, personal development and a healthy balanced lifestyle.

List of members 2016-2017, 2017-2018

      • Marie Cascarano co-Chair (Office of Health Promotion)
      • Casey Coleman (Center for Student Involvement)
      • Jerry Collins (Office of Student Conduct)
      • Emily Cordero (Greek Life)
      • Kristine DeJesus co-Chair (Counseling and Psychological Services)
      • John Delate (Residence Life)
      • Thea Dyer (Residence Life)
      • Romayne Eaker-Kelly (Campus Recreation)
      • Brian Edwards (LGBTQ Center)
      • Shannon Gary (Dean of Students)
      • Jaqueline Lawrence (EMS)
      • Virginia Mohr (Campus Recreation)
      • Detective John Nielsen (University Police Department)
      • Kevin Schafer (Residence Life)
      • Alexis Sell (University Health Center)
      • Joel Torres (ADAPT- Community Partner)

Social Marketing Campaigns

      • Red Hawk Safety Tips: This campaign promotes responsible drinking tips and how to reduce risks associated with high-risk drinking.
      • Medical Amnesty Policy (MAP) campaign: A social marketing campaign to promote the Medical Amnesty policy launched in the fall 2010 semester and has continued to date. Materials included posters and magnets. All residential students were provided with a MAP magnet upon move- in.
      • Marijuana Campaign: In the 2016-2018 review period, a multi-part marijuana myth/fact ad campaign was developed and implemented.
      • RX Drug Campaign: In the 2016-2018 review period, a multi-part RX drug prevention campaign was developed and implemented.
      • Safer Spring Break campaign – A campaign to promote responsible drinking and educate students about the signs of alcohol poisoning and promote the Medical Amnesty Policy (NJ 411 Lifeline Legislation) was created and implemented during the spring of 2017 and spring of 2018.

Educational workshops and presentations

  • New Student Seminar classes- facilitated by Health Promotion Staff and Peer Advocates.
    • Responsible Decision Making: Interactive program covering basic facts about alcohol, drugs and safer sex practices, along with a discussion on the implications of high-risk drinking and available resource.
  • Family session for new student orientation- presented by Dr. Marie Cascarano & Dr. Kristine DeJesus.
    • Underage Drinking and Other Drug Use: An Opportunity for Discussion: Talking to your student does make a difference! Although most students behave as if their families don’t understand anything, they actually hear (and value) what you say! This session covers current national and campus trends, what the University is doing to address alcohol and other drugs, and how you can begin a conversation with your student.
  • Family session for new student orientation
    • Community and Conduct Expectations: Find out about campus safety and community standards from our University Police and Director of Student Conduct.
  • Student session for new student orientation which reviews AOD policy and sanctions.
    • Campus Community Expectations– The Director of Student Conduct and the University Police Department will introduce our Student Code of Conduct, which explains our expectations of you as a member of our community.

Educational harm reduction interventions: These initiatives are designed to empower students to make healthier and responsible choices. Among these programs are Alcohol Wise, e-CHUG and e-Toke, which are online intervention programs.

      • Alcohol Wise: All first-year students were required to complete Alcohol-Wise, an online alcohol education prevention program.
      • e-CHUG: The electronic Check-Up to Go, is a brief, self-assessment that provides you with accurate, detailed and personalized feedback on your use of alcohol, and specific information and helpful resources in the Montclair State University community.
      • e-TOKE: The electronic THC Online Knowledge Experience is a brief, self-assessment that provides you with accurate, detailed and personalized feedback on your use of marijuana, and specific information and helpful resources in the Montclair State University community.

These programs are available to the entire campus community on the Health Promotion and CAPS website. High-risk groups, including first-year students, athletes and Greek pledges are targeted specifically to participate in e-CHUG and e-TOKE.

Recovery Room: The Recovery Room began in the spring 2012 semester and is an informal & confidential group of students who want to explore their substance use, self-identify as recovering from alcohol and other drugs, or those seeking recovery resources, to network and to support one another in a safe environment, while in college. Students in need of professional counseling services are referred to CAPS. This group is only open to Montclair State University students who are currently in recovery from alcohol or other drugs, looking to explore their relationship with alcohol and other drugs, make changes in their substance use, or actively seeking recovery resources. This group has had an overwhelming response of support from students, faculty and staff across campus and had regular weekly attendance of between 3-10 students.

Substance-Free Activities: Montclair State University provides a healthy and stable support structure for students in addition to their regular academic routine. There are hundreds of programs offered by various departments and student organizations that promote health and wellness and are substance- free. In the fall of 2014, the University launched HawkSync, an online involvement management system. With the launch of HawkSync the calendar is more centralized and accessible to students.

Intentional and collaborative programming between departments encourages student involvement with activities that are substance- free.  Special emphasis is placed on weekend and Thursday night programming, as these are traditionally times that students may choose to become involved in inappropriate and unhealthy activities.  Intentional and collaborative programming is also done for the first forty days of the fall semester as data shows that this is a time for determining true connections to a college or university, specifically by first-year students.  In addition to weekend trips, special events on the weekend and throughout the week, an event/trip is planned each day for the first forty days of the fall semester.  Events and trips are intentionally varied and diversified in order to appeal to the diverse population of students at Montclair State University.  “Red Hawk Frenzy” is publicized by the Center for Student Involvement, Residence Life and Campus Recreation through a variety of print and social media. Examples of programs offered during “Red Hawk Frenzy” include “RecFest”, spaghetti social, bingo, Yankee’s trip, Broadway show trips, pumpkin painting, “Glow week” activities, and a variety of fitness exercise classes.  Students are instrumental in the planning and execution of these events. A similar program called “Winter Warm-up” and a Day of Wellness are offered when students come back to campus in January to begin the spring semester.  “The Center for Student Involvement, Residence Life, and the Department of Campus Recreation continue to work together throughout the year to provide events, trips and activities for all students.  This is done to encourage participation in activities that foster positive social, emotional, and physical well-being.  The concept is that by offering a variety of healthy outlets for students to be involved in, they will choose these activities over unhealthy or inappropriate ones. This is an on-going process and one that is routinely evaluated for its effectiveness.  This is done by reviewing attendance records and issuing electronic program evaluations to students upon completion of events.

Campus Recreation

The Department of Campus Recreation provides programs, services and facilities that encourage personal development and learning experiences through enjoyable sport and recreational opportunities. The Student Recreation Center at Montclair State University is approximately 78,000 square feet with over 250 pieces of cardio, fitness and strength equipment.  It also supports a 6-lane, 25-yard long indoor pool, full size gym, two racquetball courts, two multi-purpose fitness classrooms, and two lounge areas. Students receive automatic membership through activity fees.  The facility is open Monday-Friday from 6:00 a.m. – 1:00 a.m. and from 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 a.m. on weekends, for students to use in a variety of both active and passive ways.  Approximately 2,000 students use the facility on a daily basis.  350 students are employed in a variety of capacities at the recreation center.

The Student Recreation Center markets the concept of making choices that promote health, wellness, and fun for all students on campus.  The goal of the recreation center and the Department of Campus Recreation is to provide appropriate outlets for student involvement that are substance-free. The facility acts as a safe haven for students to come and be involved in a variety of ways. Opportunities include:

      • Approximately 50 free group exercise classes a week including but not limited to Yoga, Zumba, Mixed Martial Arts, Body Pump, TRX, Body Sculpt and Pilates.
      • Lap swimming, free swim instruction, and aquatic events.
      • Ping pong and racquetball.
      • Open gym.
      • Two floors of free weights and cardio equipment.
      • Lounge areas for free video game rentals, Wii games, 3-D television, game nights, etc.
      • Space for Wi-Fi use and doing homework.
      • Weekly special events designed to meet the needs of a diverse student population, including but not limited to: Zumba-thons, “Is the Price”, Bingo, “Minute to Win It”, Hamster Ball in the Pool, as well as a variety of community service projects that are student driven.

Intramural Sports and Club Sports range from non-competitive to moderately competitive activities that are open to all students on campus.  A variety of sports from table tennis and corn hole to soccer and volleyball provide diverse choices.  Open, male, female, and Greek leagues are provided for most intramural sport activities.  Seasons are relatively short to encourage a larger participation level.  Club Sports are initiated and run by students with the assistance and guidance by campus recreation staff.  These sport activities require little to no previous experience and are positive physical and social outlets for students.

“Outdoor Adventure” is a program that offers monthly hikes and weekend programs including canoeing, horseback riding, rock climbing, and camping.  Attendance for these outdoor experiential activities continues to grow, offering both introductory and intermediate level experiences designed to provide physical challenges, teamwork experiences and an appreciation for nature and the environment.  All of these programs have an emphasis on healthy outlets where students can learn, enjoy and grow.

The Center for Student Involvement (CSI)

The Center for Student Involvement is responsible for co-curricular and extracurricular programming, in which all students at Montclair State University are encouraged to participate. In addition to working with all student organizations on campus, special emphasis is placed on the needs of the commuter student. Activities are designed to develop and refresh the body and mind in the form of entertainment, educational enrichment, cultural diversity and fine arts activities. The organizations listed under the Student Government Association support these objectives.

CSI serves as the “clearinghouse” for programming events on campus. We play an active role in assisting all clubs and organizations as they plan on- or off- campus events. Our office oversees a master calendar of activities, while also serving as advisors and facilitators for student clubs, organizations and the Student Government Association.

“Red Hawk Frenzy” occurs in September and is publicized by the Center for Student Involvement, Residence Life and Campus Recreation throughout orientation. Social media, flyers, and printed calendars are utilized to advertise these events for students. Examples of programs offered during “Red Hawk Frenzy” include movie nights, game nights, ice cream socials, off-campus trips, “RecFest”, spaghetti socials, and Friday night fire pits. Students also participate in the planning and execution of these events. In September 2016 there were 83 Red Hawk Frenzy Events offered. In 2017 there were 74 specific Red Hawk Frenzy Events offered and an additional 18 sporting events, and 7 theatrical performances. On top of these numbers, there are an additional 100+ events offered by student clubs and organizations each year.

Individual Based Programs and Interventions

In order to assess, prevent, and manage University challenges related to the use of alcohol and other drugs (AOD), CAPS has developed and participates in numerous campus-based initiatives directed toward reducing high-risk alcohol and other drug (AOD) use among students.  Utilizing a multi-disciplinary approach, individuals from across the campus (including, faculty, staff, and students) are working collaboratively to identify and support students who are at risk for alcohol and other drug abuse.  CAPS provides a number of services to students who are either at risk for AOD related difficulties or who present with on-going substance-related concerns.  These are summarized as follows:

Individual counseling:  All clients seen at CAPS for counseling are assessed through the initial clinical interview process and complete the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and the Cannabis Use Dependence Scale-Revised (CUDIT-R).  Students scoring “8” or higher on the AUDIT or an “8” or higher on the CUDIT-R are recommended to take part in the ECHO program.  Individual treatment plans are modified to incorporate AOD issues, where appropriate.  Typically, clinical interventions are included to address AOD issues as a component of therapy.  Students who present for the treatment of AOD issues generally present to CAPS with co-occurring mental health diagnosis.  Counseling is focused on treating the student holistically, thus working on the substance use and other presenting problems concurrently.  Additionally, students with ongoing AOD concerns are provided with off-site referrals to community providers who specialize in treating addictions or more intensive treatment programs geared towards treating people with addictions. These referrals are indicated for students with a significant AOD addiction that requires long-term, intensive, or multi-disciplinary treatment and/or detoxification.  During the 2016/2017 academic year, 480 students were screened for substance abuse issues using the AUDIT and CUDIT-R at the time of intake.  Of the 480 students assessed at CAPS, 16% scored “8” or higher on the AUDIT, 16% scored “8” or higher on the CUDIT-R, and 39% of students endorsed using a drug (including prescription medication) for recreational purposes.   In the 2017/2018 academic year, 557 students were screened for substance abuse issues using the AUDIT and CUDIT-R at the time of intake.  Of the 557 students assessed at CAPS, 13% scored “8” or higher on the AUDIT, 20% scored “8” or higher on the CUDIT-R, and 43% of students endorsed using a drug (including prescription medication) for recreational purposes.

Group AOD counseling: A collaborative support group called Recovery Room is co-facilitated by the CAPS Coordinator of Alcohol and Other Drugs program, Kristine De Jesus, PsyD, and the Director of Health Promotion, Marie Cascarano, EdD. Recovery rooms offered a supportive space for students to connect, and support one another is understanding how their life has been impacted by alcohol and/or drugs and find new ways of coping.

Community Referrals:  Clients presenting with AOD issues who require referral to an off-campus facility or service provider are interviewed for information regarding their geographic and insurance-related requirements.  In this way, an appropriate referral can be provided that best meets the needs of the client.  CAPS maintains a database of local and national resources for individuals requiring off-campus treatment or intervention.  In 2016/2017 10% of students seen at CAPS for short-term therapy were provided a referral off campus for additional treatment (not specifically for AOD treatment).  In 2017/2018 14% of students seen at CAPS for short-term therapy were provided a referral off campus for additional treatment (not specifically for AOD treatment).  Community Referrals for students with AOD concerns are facilitated by the clinician meeting with the student, the AOD Program Coordinator, or CAPS Referral Coordinator.  Statistics for AOD specific referrals are not available.

Exploring Change and Healthy Options (ECHO):  The cornerstone of the alcohol and other drug treatment services at CAPS is the Exploring Change and Healthy Options (ECHO) program. The ECHO program provides students with the opportunity to explore their alcohol and/or other drug use in a supportive, non-judgmental environment. Personal exploration helps students make informed decisions about their use of substances and increase their awareness of the role that alcohol and drugs may play in their lives. The principal idea behind ECHO is that students are provided with personalized information related to their alcohol and drug use that is presented in a non-judgmental format.   Students then have the opportunity to make their own informed decisions about their AOD use and are supported in the decision they choose.  The non-judgmental clinical approach used in harm-reduction programming such as ECHO incorporates Motivational Interviewing (MI).  CAPS counselors are provided with basic MI training that will assist them in competently administering the ECHO intervention.

  1. The ECHO intervention is a 2 to 3 session intervention that provides education, information, and an opportunity to reflect on the impact of alcohol and other drugs on the individual’s life. With increased consciousness about AOD use, students are provided an opportunity to determine what, if any, changes she/he wants to make in her/his AOD use.  With the help of the CAPS clinicians, students learn options for reducing harm, and assistance with creating a plan for change if available and if students are interested in making a change.
  2. ECHO is based on the Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students (BASICS), a program that incorporates a harm-reduction approach toward prevention and is designed for college students ages 18 to 24. BASICS is a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Model Program and is employed by universities throughout the United States.
  3. The heart of the BASICS model is personalized feedback for the student. Accordingly, the ECHO intervention employs the use of electronic Check Up To Go (e-CHUG) or electronic THC Online Knowledge Experience (e-T),), online assessments that generate personalized feedback based on responses the student provides on his/her use of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana.   In addition, students are provided their scores from the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), Cannabis Use Disorders Identification Test-Revised (CUDIT-R) as well as their score from the substance abuse scale on the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms-62.   These scores and comparative data are used to promote self-awareness and reflection about one’s alcohol or drug use.

The ECHO program includes three primary components:

      • Initial assessment (including a clinical interview) and review of alcohol and other drug (AOD) use
      • Personalized assessment and feedback of current AOD use patterns
      • Group designed to assist the student in making educated decisions about future use of alcohol and illicit substances *

The utilization of an individual and a group session allowed staff to provide individual feedback to the students as well as provide psycho-education in an interactive group thus allowing students to connect with peers and learn from one another’s experiences.

*Not all students who present for an ECHO intake Assessment are appropriate for group.  Students that are not appropriate for group meet with a CAPS clinician individually to complete the components of the ECHO program.

People may also participate in ECHO for one of the following reasons:

      1. Self-Assessment – Those students who are interested in learning about how their alcohol and other drug use impacts their lives are encouraged to complete the ECHO program. Students are not required to stop using alcohol or other drugs; rather, they are asked to share honestly in a confidential and non-judgmental environment so that they can learn more about the role that alcohol and other drugs play in their lives.
      2. Referral from Coordinator of Student Conduct – ECHO is offered as a program to students who have been found responsible for violating Montclair State University’s alcohol and other drug policy. It is used to capitalize on the “teachable moments” that present themselves when students are in violation of Montclair State University’s alcohol and other drug policy.

In the 2016/2017 academic year 40 students were referred to ECHO and completed the initial intake, and 25 students participated in the ECHO groups.  In 2017/2018 academic year 52 students were referred to ECHO and completed the initial intake and 39 students participated in the ECHO groups.

Substance Abuse Screening Days:  CAPS hosts a University-wide alcohol and marijuana screening event during the fall and spring semesters.   In the 2016/2017 CAPS screened 245 students using the AUDIT and CUDIT-R.  In 2017/2018, 100 students were screened using both the AUDIT and CUDIT-R.

Chart mapping the participation in the ECHO program

Effectiveness of the Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Program

Changes Implemented Based Upon 2014-2016 Biennial Review Evaluation

Recommendation:  Collaborate with faculty to improve response rate on NCHA II.

Action: Partnering with Public Health faculty for the spring 2017 survey administration.

Recommendation:  Facilitate an alcohol and other drug informational session for various departments and offices across campus to raise awareness about current trends on campus, dispel common myths related to alcohol and other drug use, identify students in need of assistance, and understand campus resources.

Action: Session facilitated for instructor of New Student Seminar courses.

Recommendation: Identify and develop a strategic plan to address the new and emerging drug trends.

Action: Recommendation not fulfilled. Efforts and resources were allotted to develop support and programs for students in recovery.

Recommendation: Further explore healthy living and/or substance free living learning communities.

Action:  Wellness Floor developed and piloted.

Recommendation: Look at data for alcohol transports and use of MAP as it relates to the MAP social marketing campaign to understand campus trends.

Action:  Use of MAP policy remained consistent for each semester.  New MAP policy marketing campaign developed each academic year.

2016-2018 SWOT Analysis of the Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Project

Strengths related to policies:

      • Policies at Montclair State University are progressive, proactive and education focused.  Polices are created as a collaborative work with key stakeholders including Residence Life, the Office of Student Conduct, Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS), the Office of Health Promotion, and the Center for Student Involvement (CSI). Policies are not stagnant, and reviewed and updated if necessary on an annual basis.  Senior-level administration has not only been supportive, but instrumental in the adaptation, implementation, and promotion of new and updated policies.
      • Introduction to policies at Family and Student Orientation.
      • The Advisory Committee on Alcohol and Other Drug (ACAD) leadership has an active role in the NJ Higher Education Consortium on Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention and Education (NJHEC) and NJ Student Conduct Officers meeting. During these meetings, they often provide leadership on a state level in enacting policies and practices.
      • Dining Services has established policies and procedures to request a permit to serve alcohol at an event that is hosted on campus.

Weakness related to policies:

      • Lack of staffing to fully create, implement and enforce in a timely manner.

Opportunities related to policies:

      • Collaborate with Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Team (ADAPT) to work with other colleges and universities on policies.

Threats/Challenges to policies:

      • Inconsistent follow-through by the Municipal Courts when a student is in violation of policies. This sends a mixed message to the student and threatens the educational purpose of the University policies.

Strengths related to programs/interventions:

      • Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Project (AODPP) is theory based, evidence informed and utilizes best practices including environmental management.
      • We do not have an “Alcohol Awareness Week” since education and intervention programs are ongoing throughout the year.
      • AODPP is collaborative and student driven.
      • Collaboration allows pulling together limited resources and developing and implementing evidence-based programming.
      • Intentional programming and events are offered as alternatives during high-risk drinking times such as the first six weeks of the semester, Thursday evenings and weekends. Outreach is provided to student groups and organizations that typically do not utilize services such as Campus Recreation and making a connection to support those students.
      • Division-wide collaborations for big events including Move- In Days, Red Hawk Days, Homecoming etc. to engage students as soon they enter the University.
      • “Recovery Room” is offered weekly and is an informal & confidential group for students who want to explore their substance use, self-identify as recovering from alcohol and other drugs, or those seeking recovery resources, to network and to support one another in a safe environment, while in college.
      • The role of ACAD leadership during orientation.
      • Data collected utilized the NCHA II and is conducted every two years.
      • Monthly meetings are scheduled with a specific agenda and have a consistent representation from many key offices on campus.
      • All incoming first year and transfer students must complete an online secondary prevention program.
      • The introduction of HawkSync enables University staff to better gauge attendance at events and view a centralized calendar of all the upcoming events/programs being hosted by clubs and organizations.
      • ACAD hosted a Narcan training open to members of the committee and invited campus partners. Additionally, EMS and University Policy are trained.

Weakness related to programs/interventions

      • Lack of resources including staff and funding. State-wide and federal funding are not available to support these initiatives.   Clinically, we could use another staff person to specialize in Alcohol and Other Drug issues.  Support staff for student conduct is needed to enable to focus on prevention and education efforts instead of just being reactionary, and to have a better presence on campus.
      • Though data is collected every two years using the ACHA-NCHA II, the response rate has been less than satisfactory.
      • Currently, descriptive data analysis of the NCHA II is conducted. We do not have the resources to conduct a more robust analysis of the raw data.
      • The trends in drug use and abuse, along with “new” drug of choice, can vary greatly from year to year.

Opportunities related to programs/interventions

      • Continue to identify high-risk times and then provide intentional alcohol free events for identified high-risk days of use.
      • Increased demand for program utilization allows for engagement in health enhancing substance free activities.
      • Expand services for the Wellness Community, a healthy living and substance free living learning communities.
      • Collaborate with campus departments to better allocate and utilize limited resources.
      • Present Alcohol and Other Drug informational sessions to various departments and offices across campus.
      • Create a visible recovery community and network of support for students.
      • Expand and promote Red Hawk Recovery Program.

Threats/Challenges related to programs/interventions

      • Offices and departments who also offer alcohol programming are well intentioned, however often the information is not necessarily evidence based or consistent with best practices.
      • Faculty and staff will at times provide information that is not accurate regarding the perceived harm of substance use.

Recommended Changes to Implement for the 2018-2020 Biennial Review Period

      • Determine the feasibility of establishing a RX Drop Box on campus.
      • Expand recovery services to better meet the needs of students.
      • Build upon the healthy living and/or substance free living learning communities.
      • Work with key campus stakeholders to develop a marketing timeline for recovery housing.

Appendix

Alcohol or Other Drug Conduct Sanction Guide

Violation Sanction Level Recommended Sanction Rationale for Sanction Circumstances to Consider
Being in the Presence of Alcohol, but not consuming
(first offense)
Level 1 Warning
E-Chug & JE 5
-Self Assessment
-Intro to MSU’s social norms data
-Guidance on improving decision making skills
Was the student not consuming or could it not be proved that student was not consuming?
Being in the Presence of Alcohol, but not consuming
(second offense )
Level 2 2 month probation
3rd millennium & JE 8 & 15
-Self Assessment
-Intro to MSU’s social norms data
-Guidance on improving decision making skills
-Alcohol and other drugs education
Was the student not consuming or could it not be proved that student was not consuming?
What did the student miss in the first judicial experience?
Being in the presence of marijuana
(first offense)
Level 2 2 months probation
E-Toke & JE 5
-Self Assessment
-Intro to MSU’s social norms data
-Guidance on improving decision making skills
– Drugs education
Was the student not using or could it not be proved that student was not using?
Underage possession of alcohol
(first offense)
Level 2 2 months probation
UTI; JE 5 & 8
-Self Assessment
-Intro to MSU’s social norms data
-Guidance on improving decision making skills
-Alcohol and other drugs education
This is a common developmental experience.
What type of alcohol was involved and how much?
Underage consumption of alcohol
(first offense)
Level 2 2 months probation
UTI; JE 5 & 8
-Self Assessment
-Intro to MSU’s social norms data
-Guidance on improving decision making skills
-Alcohol and other drugs education
This is a common developmental experience.
What type of alcohol was involved & were they using responsibly?
Alcohol intoxication
(first offense)
**If transported, student will see DOSC.
Level 2 3 months probation
UTI; JE 5 & 8
-Self Assessment
-Intro to MSU’s social norms data
-Guidance on improving decision making skills
-Alcohol and other drugs education
This is a common developmental experience.
What type of alcohol was involved, how much was consumed, were they in any danger?
Creating a disturbance relating to alcohol use Level 2 3 months probation
UTI; JE 3, 5 & 8
Self Assessment
-Intro to MSU’s social norms data
-Guidance on improving decision making skills
-Alcohol and other drugs education
What type of disturbance?
Was anyone in danger?
How did staff become aware of disturbance?
Hosting an underage party Level 2 Probation- Consult with DOSC
UTI; JE 3, 5 & 8
Self Assessment
-Intro to MSU’s social norms data
-Guidance on improving decision making skills
-Alcohol and other drugs education
Parties are a normal part of college life.
Was the host providing alcohol, or just providing a place to drink?
How much alcohol was involved?
Hospital transport due to alcohol/drug use Level 3 6 months probation
UTI/MAR 101; JE 5 & 8/9, PN, and ASP
All transports will be seen by DOSC.
Self Assessment
-Intro to MSU’s social norms data
-Guidance on improving decision making skills
-Alcohol and other drugs education
-One on one personalized intervention & feedback
While drinking is a common experience for college age students, drinking until the point of alcohol poisoning is not common or safe.
How can the CD/CA provide basic support for further education and intervention in a non-judgmental way?
Underage possession of alcohol
(second offense)
Level 3 4 months probation
UTI; JE 15; PN, and AE
Self Assessment
-Intro to MSU’s social norms data
-Guidance on improving decision making skills
-Alcohol and other drugs education
-One on one personalized intervention & feedback
This is a common developmental experience.
What type of alcohol was involved and how much? What did the student miss in the first judicial experience?
How can the CD/CA provide basic support for further education and intervention in a non-judgmental way?
Underage consumption of alcohol
(second offense)
Level 3 4 months probation
UTI; JE 15; PN, and ADE
Self Assessment
-Intro to MSU’s social norms data
-Guidance on improving decision making skills
-Alcohol and other drugs education
-One on one personalized intervention & feedback
While it is common for college students to drink it is rare that they have more than one interaction with the conduct process.
What did the student miss in the first judicial experience?
How can the CD/CA provide basic support for further education and intervention in a non-judgmental way?
Alcohol intoxication
(second offense)
Level 3 6 months probation
E-chug, UTI; JE 15, PN, and ADE
Self Assessment
-Intro to MSU’s social norms data
-Guidance on improving decision making skills
-Alcohol and other drugs education
-One on one personalized intervention & feedback
While it is common for college students to drink it is rare that they have more than one interaction with the conduct process.
What type of alcohol was involved and how much?
What did the student miss in the first experience?
How can the CD/CA provide basic support for further education and intervention in a non-judgmental way?
Possession of marijuana
(first offense)
Level 3 5 months probation minimum-consult with DOSC
MAR 101, JE 5 & 9, and ADE
Loss of Housing-Consult with DOSC
Self Assessment
-Intro to MSU’s social norms data
-Guidance on improving decision making skills
– Drug related education
-One on one personalized intervention & feedback
This is a common developmental experience (although much less common than alcohol use).
How much marijuana was involved?
How can the CD/CA provide basic support for further education and intervention in a non-judgmental way?
Marijuana related offense
(first offense)
Level 3 5 months probation minimum-consult with DOSC
MAR 101, JE 5 & 9, and ADE
Loss of Housing-Consult with DOSC
Self Assessment
-Intro to MSU’s social norms data
-Guidance on improving decision making skills
-Alcohol and other drugs education -One on one personalized intervention & feedback
While it is common for college students to drink it is rare that they have more than one interaction with the conduct process.
What did the student miss in the first judicial experience?
How can the CD/CA provide basic support for further education and intervention in a non-judgmental way?
Alcohol/Drug related vandalism Level 3 4-8 months probation-consult with DOSC
3rd Millennium, JE 5, 8/9, & 20; and ADE
Self Assessment
-Intro to MSU’s social norms data
-Guidance on improving decision making skills
-Alcohol and other drugs education
-One on one personalized intervention & feedback
What were the circumstances that led up to the destruction of property?
How serious was the offense?
How can the CD/CA provide basic support for further education and intervention in a non-judgmental way?
Alcohol/Drug related violence Level 3 4-8 months probation-consult with DOSC
3rd Millennium, JE 5, 8/9 & 18, and ADE
Self Assessment
-Intro to MSU’s social norms data
-Guidance on improving decision making skills
-Alcohol and other drugs education
-One on one personalized intervention & feedback
What were the circumstances that led up to the violent incident?
How serious was the offense?
How can the CD/CA provide basic support for further education and intervention in a non-judgmental way?
Marijuana related Offense
(second offense+)
Level 4 Refer to DOSC
-Likely suspension or expulsion from University
Self Assessment
-Intro to MSU’s social norms data
-Guidance on improving decision making skills
-Drugs related education
-One on one personalized intervention & feedback
While college students do occasionally use marijuana, it is rare that they are caught using and even rarer that they have more than one interaction with the conduct process.
How much marijuana was involved?
How can the CD/CA provide basic support for further education and intervention in a non-judgmental way?
Drug related offense (other than marijuana) Level 4 Refer to DOSC
-Likely suspension or expulsion from University
Self Assessment
-Intro to MSU’s social norms data
-Guidance on improving decision making skills
-Drug related education
-One on one personalized intervention & feedback
Most college students do not use drugs; however experimentation with drugs is developmentally appropriate.
How can the CD/CA provide basic support for further education and intervention in a non-judgmental way?
Alcohol related offense
(three or more offenses)
Level 4 Refer to DOSC
-Likely suspension from University
Self Assessment
-Intro to MSU’s social norms data
-Guidance on improving decision making skills
-Alcohol and other drugs education
-One on one personalized intervention & feedback
It is extremely rare for a student to have more than two interactions with the conduct process.
Are there indicators that the student is abusing alcohol?
What type of alcohol was involved and how much?
What did the student miss in the previous two experiences?
How can the CD/CA provide basic support for further education and intervention in a non-judgmental way?
Drug Dealing/Growing on Campus Level 5 Refer to DOSC
-Expulsion from University
-Student requires treatment for benefit of their health and safety. And to ensure health and safety of MSU community How can this experience provide a positive learning experience for the student?
What positive effects can this experience have on the community?

 

Loss of Housing is to be discussed on a case-by-case basis with Director of Student Conduct/University Conduct Officer.


UTI- 3rd Millennium’s Under the Influence
MAR 101- 3rd Millennium’s Marijuana 101
3rd Millennium- Either UTI or MAR 101; depending on if alcohol or drug-related
JE— Judicial Educator
ADE— Alcohol and/or Drug Education
PN- Parental Notification