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Denizens

Denizens

Mark Chopping, lab director

Chopping, Mark

Degrees
MPhil, University of Cambridge (England)
PhD, University of Nottingham (England)

Mark Chopping is a professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Studies and Director of the PhD program in Environmental Science and Management. He has been working in terrestrial remote sensing since 1993, when he took a position as a research assistant in a University of Cambridge research project. Since December 2003 he has served as principal investigator in a number of projects funded by NASA’s Earth Science programs, with foci on the use of NASA’s Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and high resolution imagery from commercial Earth-observing satellites for mapping vegetation structure in diverse environments. He has been a member of the NASA MISR Science Team since 2004 (co-I since 2008), the NASA Terrestrial Ecology Science Team (2008-), and more recently the NASA ABoVE Science Team (2015-).


Maija Mehmas

Wehmas, Maija

Advisor
Chopping
Degrees
MS in Natural Resources Management, BS Biology w/Ecology
Affiliations
NASA ABoVE Science Team, MSU Remote Sensing Laboratory

Maija Wehmas’ research focuses on the rapidly changing northern high latitude ecosystems. Her Masters thesis investigated the flammability of broadleaf forest patches in the uplands of boreal Alaska from a temporal and spatially explicit perspective, using remote sensing and image analysis. She is currently examining changes in shrubs in Arctic tundra using high resolution imagery, as a participant in NASA’s Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE).


Isamar Cortes

Cortes, Isamar

Advisor
Lorenzo-Trueba
Office
CELS Computational Suite
Degrees
MS Earth and Environmental Science, BS Sustainability Science, BA Geography
Affiliations
Lorenzo-Trueba Lab, CIRES, MSU Remote Sensing Lab

Isamar is studying the effects of climate conditions on mangrove ecosystems, using remote sensing and numerical modeling. Her work explores how average net evaporation affects Caribbean mangrove islands; new research will investigate how seasonal variations affect mangrove ecosystems through zonation and die off, using Landsat imagery to study changes in mangrove islands across the Caribbean. The work will focus on: the role of average net evaporation on the spatial distribution of mangrove ecosystems; trends in the seasonal effects of net evaporation; and the combined effects of tides as sea level rises.


Jesse Kolodin

Kolodin, Jesse

Advisor
Lorenzo-Trueba
Office
CELS 232
Ext
x5423
Degrees
BS in Economics
MS in Geosciences with a concentration in Coastal Geomorphology
Jesse Kolodin’s current research focuses on the geomorphology of barrier island systems of NJ in relation to sea level rise. He has recently embarked on projects leveraging important new survey technologies, including the use of small unmanned aerial vehicles (sUAVs, colloquially, “drones”) that fly multispectral, thermal, and lidar sensors. Jesse has worked on a theoretical analysis for building a dune model, based on artificial dune construction and is working on an hedonic regression analysis for New Jersey beachfront communities and the impact these artificial dunes have on local property values (beachfront properties and extending the analysis to entire townships).

Ex-denizens