Courses

Below is a list of all graduate courses offered by the Psychology Department for matriculated students. Please note that the descriptions include changes that will be reflected in the graduate course catalog starting in the Spring 2018 semester.

PSYC 504 Cognitive Psychology (3 credits)
This course provides students with in-depth exposure to classic and contemporary theories and research in cognition. Specific topics covered include neuroscience, attention, perception, memory, knowledge representation, language, reasoning and decision-making, and natural and artificial intelligence. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 506 Multicultural Psychology (3 Credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc or School Psychologist programs. This course is designed to expose students to multicultural issues which are central to theory, practice, and research. The course focuses on awareness, knowledge, and skills. Awareness is centered on understanding multiple value systems and worldviews and gaining insight into one's own cultural socialization and inherent biases. Knowledge focuses on acquiring accurate understanding of various cultural groups. Skills relate to specific culturally appropriate and tailored interventions. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 510 Research Methods in Psychology (3 Credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Psychology, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc, Industrial Organizational Psychology, or School Psychologist programs. This course addresses skills needed to read, understand and critically evaluate research reports. Students also learn how to carry out the entire research process, beginning with identifying the research problem and ending with a thesis or research report. Factorial analysis of variance and the major multiple correlational designs are explained. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 520 Human Experimental Psychology (4 Credits)
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 510. Students survey methods and topics in human experimental psychology by conducting, analyzing, and reporting on experiments on topics to be drawn from cognition, memory, language, perception, learning, sensation, and neuropsychology. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab.

PSYC 550 Quantitative and Statistical Methods (3 Credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Psychology, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc ClinicalPsyc, Industrial Organizational Psychology, or School Psychologist programs. This course presents the theory and use of simple and factorial ANOVA, regression, and covariance to analyze representative psychological data. The use of computer packages for analysis is included. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 551 Latina/o Psychology (3 Credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc or School Psychologist programs. This course examines the personal, familial, social, cultural and institutional forces that affect the psychology of Latina/os and explores how these factors impact assessment and treatment. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 552 Social Psychology (3 Credits)
This course surveys and analyzes the theoretical and empirical literature of modern social psychology. Among topics covered are the history of social psychology, attitude development and change, aggression, helping behavior, social perception, stereotyping and prejudice, social influence, and a number of other themes and issues focused on the individual's relationship to the larger social structure. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 559 Personnel Selection: Issues and Procedures (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Industrial Organizational Psychology program. This course addresses statistical, conceptual, and legal issues in organizational selection processes. Students learn about the role of individual differences, job performance, and job analysis in formulating and validating predictive hypotheses of employee success. Other topics include the consideration of applicant attitudes, discrimination, and utility in judging the success of selection systems, as well as methods of employee assessment and how these assessments must be conducted in order to be fair and successful. Students complete applied projects that require statistical analyses and gaining access to an organization to collect information necessary to develop selection procedures for a particular position. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 560 Advanced Educational Psychology (3 credits)
A comprehensive treatment of the cognitive and affective characteristics of the learner and the processes of learning and teaching provide the framework for this course. Behavioral, cognitive, and information-processing theory are presented and their applicability to instructional strategies and classroom dynamics is discussed. Other areas included are the origins of individual differences, including heredity and environment, early childhood education, cultural differences, student motivation, classroom management, measurement and evaluation, exceptional children, and other topics. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 561 Developmental Psychology (3 credits)
Philosophical, conceptual, theoretical, and research issues pertinent to human development from prenatal life to adulthood are presented. Core conceptual issues of development, such as the nature-nurture controversy, the continuity-discontinuity issue, and the issue of stability-instability, are discussed, and their relationships to major theories in developmental psychology are examined. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 563 Theories of Learning (3 credits)
The aim of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of modern learning theory, its historical context, theoretical ideas, research, and applications. To this end, the theoretical ideas of the major schools of learning--behaviorism, gestalt, cognitivism, and information-processing--are reviewed. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 565 Developmental Psychopathology (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Psychology, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc ClinicalPsyc, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc, or School Psychologist programs. This course covers the development and diagnosis of psychological disorders, including mood, anxiety, disruptive behavior, substance use, and autism spectrum disorders. Students learn the developmental psychopathology framework and explore the characteristics, course, and etiology of psychological disorders. Emphasis is placed on examining relationships between cognitive, biological, social, and other factors which influence the developmental origins and consequences of emotional and behavioral problems, particularly in childhood and adolescence. This course also addresses issues associated with assessment, classification, and diagnosis, and students are expected to learn diagnostic categories and criteria from the most recent edition of the DSM. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 566 Interventions for Effective Organizations (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Industrial Organizational Psychology program. This course examines interventions based on psychological principles that are used to enhance individual and organizational effectiveness. Common interventions covered include training and development programs, executive coaching, leader and leadership development, talent management, organizational design, and innovation processes. Knowledge and skills important to developing these interventions and facilitating them in applied settings are developed. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 568 Psychology of Group Dynamics (3 credits)
This course presents theories of group dynamics and illustrative application to understand personal, marital, political, industrial, and professional life. Personal participation by the student in a group interactive process is required. The course is designed especially to help group leaders understand the complex underlying dynamic forces that influence our behavior in groups. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 569 Group Theory and Development in Organizations (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Industrial Organizational Psychology program. This course integrates theory and research on work groups with more practical applications of development and assessment of these groups. Students learn about factors that can facilitate and inhibit the development and effectiveness of successful work groups. Students learn various models of group development and team process, as well as different ways of assessing team effectiveness. Students are engaged in team projects throughout the semester to learn how working in groups and teams differs from working alone and working in a more traditionally hierarchical fashion. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 570 Leadership: Theory and Development (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Industrial Organizational Psychology program. This course integrates theories, research, and practice in leadership and leadership development. Students learn historical and contemporary psychological theories of leadership and how their own (and others) personal views about leadership influence what they perceive as leadership. Students also learn how to develop leaders and leadership in organizations as suggested by various theories. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 571 Organizational Psychology (3 credits)
This course examines the psychological aspects of organizational behavior. Emphasis is placed on the organization effected by individual psychological processes and behavior. Areas covered include social norms, group and team processes, leadership and power, motivation, job attitudes and satisfaction, and organizational change. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 573 Behavioral Neuroscience (3 credits)
This course addresses the physiological bases of normal and abnormal behavior, with emphasis on the anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the human nervous system. Beginning with the nerve cell, the course progresses through the receptors, spinal cord, cortical and subcortical structures, psychosurgery, biofeedback, and other topics. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 574 Cognitive Assessment (3 credits)                                                                              
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/AdolescClinicalPsyc, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc, or School Psychologist programs. Special fee. Students learn how to administer, score, and interpret individual intelligence tests, including the Wechsler Intelligence Scales. Intelligence tests for use with children and adolescents, such as the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, are covered. Theories of intelligence and the appropriateness of the tests to specific populations are discussed. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 575 Clinical Assessment (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/AdolescClinicalPsyc, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc, or School Psychologist programs. Special fee. This course addresses the theory and practice of clinical assessment. Students learn various methods for assessing social, emotional, and behavioral problems, including unstructured and structured interviews, surveys, and rating scales. Students gain knowledge and skills of interviewing and report writing needed to engage clients, with emphasis on strategies for interviewing children, adolescents, and families. Instruments are reviewed from the standpoints of basic research and the mechanics of administration and scoring. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 577 Practicum in Psychoeducational Assessment I (1 credit)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc and School Psychologist programs. This course represents the first in a series of two 1-credit semester supervised practicum experiences in psychoeducational assessment at MSU's on-campus assessment clinic. Students are involved in planning and administration of psychoeducational evaluations of clients, as well as scoring and interpretation. Students also participate in feedback sessions with clients and families.

PSYC 578 Psychometrics (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Psychology, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc ClinicalPsyc, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc, Industrial Organizational Psychology, or School Psychologist programs. This course surveys the theory, construction, and application of psychological tests. Topics include the statistical concepts underlying measurement, reliability and validity, critical analyses of selected tests, and evaluation and interpretation of test data in practical situations. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 579 Practicum in Psychoeducational Assessment II (1 credit)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc and School Psychologist programs. This course is the second in a series of two 1-credit semester supervised practicum experiences in psychoeducational assessment at MSU's on-campus assessment clinic. Students are involved in planning and administration of psychoeducational evaluations of clients, as well as scoring and interpretation. Students also participate in feedback sessions with clients and families.

PSYC 582 Behavior Modification (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc and School Psychologist. This course reviews applications of conditioning principles to changing human behavior in clinical, educational, occupational, and community settings. Selected topics include operant and classical conditioning, social learning theory, token economies, experimental design, cognitive behavior modification, aversive control, cognitive restructuring, biofeedback, and ethical issues in behavior modification. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 583 Sensation and Perception (3 credits)
This course addresses a range of visual processing phenomena, from sensory processing to memory and thinking. Topics covered include psychophysics, the physiological bases of vision, involvement of cognitive processes in perception, perceptual development, and psychoaesthetics. The course also examines hearing, the skin senses, smell, and taste. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 584 Performance Management (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Industrial Organizational Psychology program. This course addresses how we motivate and manage individual and group performance in organizations through performance management systems. Students learn about how performance is managed, methods of collecting performance feedback, using performance management for evaluation and development purposes, and biases and consistency issues in performance appraisals. This course also covers criterion measurement and development, the use of motivational theory in performance management, sources of performance feedback, and communicating performance feedback. Students are responsible for gaining entrance into an organization and collecting the information necessary to develop a performance management system for that organization. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 585 Work Attitudes and Motivation: Theory and Application (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Industrial Organizational Psychology program. This course integrates theory on work attitudes and motivation with more practical applications of developing strategies to help today's diverse population of employees become satisfied and motivated in their work settings. Students learn historical and contemporary theories of job satisfaction, stress, and motivation, assessment of these constructs, and strategies for improving satisfaction and motivation, such as goal setting, job design, incentive systems, and participation in decision making. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 592 Health Psychology (3 credits)
This course explores the theoretical, empirical, and clinical aspects of health psychology. Discussion focuses on the relation of health psychology to other areas of psychology and various scientific disciplines. Students learn about the field’s historical development, research methodologies, theoretical models, and evidence-based interventions. 3 hours seminar.

PSYC 593 Clinical Interviewing (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc or School Psychologist programs. This course integrates the theory and practice of clinical interviewing. The goals of this course are to facilitate the development of the student's listening, diagnostic, and therapeutic interviewing skills. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 594 School-Based Interventions (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc or School Psychologist programs. This course focuses on theory, research, and implementation of school-based psychosocial interventions for children, adolescents, and their families. Students learn interviewing and treatment strategies to address various childhood problems (e.g., depression, anxiety, trauma, bullying) in the context of school and classroom settings. Issues and challenges involved in implementing interventions in schools are discussed. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 601 Behavioral Assessment and Intervention (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc or School Psychologist programs. This course provides training in techniques of behavioral assessment, including direct observation, interviews, checklists, and rating scales. Assessment is considered from an empirically-based, problem-solving model, in which students learn to select assessment tools appropriate to referral questions. Students complete a functional behavioral assessment and develop a behavior intervention plan through a supervised experience in a school setting. 3 hour lecture.

PSYC 602 Introduction to Forensic Psychology (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc program. The objective of this course is to broadly expose students to the discipline of forensic psychology and provide an understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the psychologist working within the justice system. This course introduces students to major topics and issues in forensic psychology and is divided into two sections. The first section examines forensic psychology as it relates to clinical prediction, assessment, and treatment in the civil and criminal justice systems. The second section focuses on experimental forensic psychology, orienting students to non-clinical issues faced by psychologists operating in these arenas. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 611 Internship in Industrial/Organizational Psychology (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Industrial Organizational Psychology program. This course serves as a capstone experience where students work in an applied setting and receive close and ongoing supervision by both a faculty member and a practitioner with a graduate I/O (or related) degree working in industry. Students are expected to review theory and research relevant to the field of I/O, develop individual project proposals for the investigation of a problem in their applied setting, implement their proposals after approval by their faculty member, and report their completed work in both a written and an oral report for the M.A. degree. Must be taken twice in consecutive semesters for a total of 6.0 credits.

PSYC 613 Research Methods in Forensic Psychology (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc program. This course introduces students to methods and techniques used to generate empirical research within the discipline of forensic psychology. Emphasis is placed on experimental and quasi-experimental designs. Students are introduced to the major data analytic strategies used in psychology research, as well as the ethical and legal challenges inherent in forensic psychology research. This course enables students to be educated consumers of the forensic psychological literature and to evaluate the merits of such research for its integration into forensic practice. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 620 Forensic Psychology in Criminal Proceedings (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc program. An examination of substantive criminal law in the United States, with emphasis on analysis of the justification of punishment, definition of offenses, Constitutional limits, significance of resulting harm, group criminality, and methods of exculpation or defense that impact the practice of clinical forensic psychology. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 622 Forensic Psychology in Family Proceedings (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc program. Children in the last few decades have been given special recognition and increased protection under state, federal, and international law. However, doctrines and beliefs developed in periods when the social value of children was low, as well as when the legal duties of parents and the state were minimal, continue to influence the way the law views children. This course surveys various areas of the law concerning children and examines their sources and influences. Topics covered include responsibilities of the state and family in the care of the child, including education, legal treatment of abused and neglected children, rules concerning the medical treatment of children, adoption, surrogacy and parentage, treatment of children accused of crimes in the juvenile justice system, children's disabilities, and government entitlement programs for children. This course also examines the International Convention on the Rights of the Child, a treaty that seeks to render universal certain rules respecting the treatment of children. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 626 Expert Testimony (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc program. A study of the law and rules (with particular attention given to the Federal Rules of Evidence) governing the proof of disputed issues of fact in criminal and civil trials, including the functions of judge and jury; relevancy; real and demonstrative evidence; authentication and production of writings; the examination, competency, and privileges of witnesses; hearsay; impeachment; and burden of proof, presumptions, and judicial notice in the practice of clinical forensic psychology. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 650 Theories of Interpersonal and Familial Violence (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc program. This course examines the psychological, criminological, and sociobiological theories of interpersonal and familial violence, as well as the psychological disorders commonly encountered in the context of individuals who may be perpetrators or victims of violence. This course spans topics related to both criminal and family court evaluations and involves review, critical evaluation, and integration of current scientific literature regarding diagnoses, phenomenology, and etiology of behavior. Topics include, but are not limited to, sexual violence, homicide, domestic violence, and child abuse and neglect. This course also explores relevant state and federal statute and case law regulating mental health professional practice. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 658 Seminar in Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Industrial Organizational Psychology program. This course covers the most recent advances, issues, and problems in Industrial and Organizational Psychology through relevant professional journals, technical literature, legislation and judicial decisions, advanced research techniques, and consulting practice in order to prepare students for continued education or applied practice of the field. Students critique professional journals and review the development of topics in the field. 3 hours seminar.

PSYC 659 Special Topics Seminar in Psychology (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Psychology, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc ClinicalPsyc, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc, Industrial Organizational Psychology, or School Psychologist programs. This course provides an in-depth view of important theoretical and methodological issues in various areas of psychology. It is designed to permit faculty with particular interests and expertise to provide students with a comprehensive analysis of a selected contemporary issue (or issues) in psychology. May be repeated two times for a maximum of 9 credits as long as each course topic is different. 3 hours seminar.

PSYC 661 Introduction to School Psychology (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc or School Psychologist programs. This course provides an introduction the profession and practice of school psychology. Topics include the history and foundations of school psychology, roles and functions of school psychologists, professional issues and standards, and contemporary issues and anticipated future directions in the field. Students also participate in a practicum experience, in which they learn about the roles, skills, and credentials required of school psychologists by directly observing a school psychologist employed in a K-12 school setting.

PSYC 662 Externship in School Psychology (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc or School Psychologist programs. Students serve as apprentice psychologists in cooperating school districts. A certified school psychologist, employed in the cooperating district, serves as the student's on-site supervisor. Students meet weekly with the faculty instructor for additional supervision.

PSYC 663 Independent Study (1-3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval. The student conducts an individual project under the supervision of a professor in the department. May be taken only once for a maximum of 3.0 credits.

PSYC 664 Criminal Forensic Assessment (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc program. This course examines issues related to conducting assessments for the criminal courts. Students review and critique case law and current psycho-legal research as they pertain to forensic assessment and are exposed to current, empirically supported practices in forensic assessment in several domains, including, but not limited to, violence risk, adjudicative competency, mitigation and criminal responsibility, and specific issues related to the assessment of youth charged in criminal court. Emphasis is placed on preparing written reports for the criminal courts and ethical issues often experienced in criminal forensic settings. Students learn how to administer commonly used Forensic Assessment Instruments (FAIs) and how to integrate FAI data and other testing data into assessment reports. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 665 Child and Family Forensic Assessment (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc program. This course examines issues related to conducting assessments concerning children and families for the civil courts. Students review and critique current research in forensic psychology pertaining to child and family forensic assessment, as well as developing case law, such as family law in divorce and dissolution. Current assessment practices, including the use of objective and projective (including actuarial) measures, is taught. Emphasis is placed on constructing written reports and ethical issues often experienced in forensic settings related to children and families. This course also addresses forensic mental health areas involving children and families, such as child abuse and neglect (including medical neglect), risk and safety (including domestic violence), custody and parenting time, and termination of parental rights. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 667 Lifespan Psychopathology (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Psychology, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc ClinicalPsyc, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc, Industrial Organizational, or School Psychologist programs. This course focuses on theoretical models and selected research in psychopathology across the lifespan. Students are expected to learn diagnostic categories and criteria from the most recent edition of the DSM, including anxiety and mood disorders, schizophrenia, substance use disorders, and somatic symptom disorders. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 668 Consultation Methods in Psychoeducational Settings (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc or School Psychologist programs. This course examines the theory and practice of consultation in psychoeducational settings. Students learn a collaborative, problem-solving model of consultation and about intrapersonal, interpersonal, and systemic factors associated with successful consultation. As part of the course, students serve as a consultant to a teacher under direct supervision and monitoring. Cross listed with Curriculum and Teaching, SPED 668. 3 hours lecture, 1 hour other.

PSYC 670 Evidence-Based Psychological Interventions I (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/AdolescClinicalPsyc program. This course provides an overview of the theory, research, and practice of evidence-based psychotherapy. In addition to emphasizing the development of the student’s basic therapeutic and counseling skills, this course focuses largely on psychological interventions for anxiety, mood, and other emotional disorders, including intervention strategies for children and adolescents. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 678 Ethics and Professional Issues in Psychology (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc ClinicalPsyc, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc, or School Psychologist programs. This course provides a survey of ethical and professional issues in psychology practice, teaching, and research. Through readings, discussions, and case analyses, this course aims to provide students familiarity with the Ethics Code of the American Psychological Association (APA) and skills for ethical decision making and resolution of ethical dilemmas in psychology. 3 hours seminar.

PSYC 679 Family Systems and Therapy (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc Clinical Psyc or School Psychologist programs. This course examines theoretical approaches to family systems and therapy. Students learn family-based approaches to common internalizing and externalizing disorders of childhood and adolescence, including anxiety, mood, substance use, and disruptive behavior disorders. This course also covers issues of family functioning that have special relevance for the development of emotional and behavioral problems, including trauma, maltreatment, domestic violence, divorce, and parental psychopathology. 3 hours lecture.

PSYC 680 Externship in Clinical Psychology (3 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Clinical Psyc w/conc:Child/Adolesc ClinicalPsyc, Clinical Psyc w/conc:Forensic Psyc, or School Psychologist programs. Students complete a supervised clinical experience in a mental health setting, such as a hospital, community mental health center, or school. Depending on their placements, students may provide supervised intake interviews, psychological assessments, and individual, group, and family therapy. On-site supervision takes place under the direction of a licensed mental health professional, in cooperation with the Director of Clinical Training and program directors at Montclair State. Students also meet with a Montclair State faculty supervisor on a weekly basis. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

PSYC 698 Master's Thesis (4 credits)
Prerequisite(s): Departmental approval. Independent research project done under faculty advisement. Students must follow the MSU Thesis Guidelines, which may be obtained from the Graduate School. Students should take PSYC 699 if they do not complete PSYC 698 within the semester. 

PSYC 699 Master's Thesis Extension (1 Credit)
Prerequisite(s): PSYC 698. Continuation of Master's Thesis Project. Thesis Extension will be graded as IP (in Progress) until thesis is completed, at which time a grade of Pass or Fail will be given.