Plants with small white flowers found during CSAM field work.

Biology News

Category: In the Media

hapalosiphon

Harmful algal blooms close swimming area at NJ state park for 2021 summer season

Dr. Meiyin Wu, Biology Professor, spoke with NJ Spotlight News regarding the algal blooms we have seen throughout the state over the past few years

Flu-Like Symptoms This Summer May Not Be Caused By COVID, But Ticks

CBS interviewed Assistant Professor of Biology Matthew Aardema to discuss tick populations in the area

Clinging Jellyfish Return to the Jersey Shore

Dr. Paul Bologna and his research students took John Elliott, CBS Meteorologist, with them during a recent field research outing

sugar kelp

Professor Interviewed on 60 Second Science Podcast

Dr. Colette Feehan provided insight in the episode To Fight Climate Change: Grow a Floating Forest, Then Sink It

Purple urchins consume the remainder of a small giant kelp.

In the Pacific, Global Warming Disrupted The Ecological Dance of Urchins, Sea Stars And Kelp. Otters Help Restore Balance.

When ocean heat waves and a sea star disease devastated kelp forests that are critical to sea life and the California urchin fishing industry, sea otters came to the rescue.

Dr. Adams teaching in the molecular biology lab

WSAV Honoring Black History

The news station’s segment featured Biology professor, Dr. Sandra Daise Adams

Liberty State Park mural

Why start from scratch when Mother Nature has already gone to work on Liberty State Park interior?

An opinion piece by Frank Gallagher, Claus Holzapfel and Jennifer Krumins published on NJ.com

Dr. Vanderklein featured on CBS2 News

Sacrificing 2,000 Trees To Thwart a Troublesome Beetle

Dr. Dirk Vanderklein provided insight regarding ash trees, and the invasive emerald ash borer beetle to CBS2 News as Montclair prepares to remove many of the trees.

Paul Bologna with students visiting Rhode Island for jellyfish research

Cling and Sting: Tiny jellyfish a big hazard in South County ponds, river

Professor Paul Bologna, accompanied by two students, took a trip up to Rhode Island to collect samples and data of the invasive jellyfish now in the area.